Phil McNeely

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Phil McNeely
Ontario MPP
In office
2003–2014
Preceded by Brian Coburn
Succeeded by Marie-France Lalonde
Constituency Ottawa—Orléans
Ottawa City Councillor for Cumberland Ward
In office
2000–2003
Preceded by Robert van den Ham
Succeeded by Rob Jellett
Personal details
Born 1938 (age 75–76)
Cumberland, Ontario
Political party Liberal
Residence Ottawa, Ontario
Occupation Business owner, engineer

Philip McNeely is a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, representing the riding of Ottawa—Orléans for the Ontario Liberal Party.

Background[edit]

McNeely was born in Cumberland, Ontario and is bilingual. He was educated at Lisgar Collegiate and McGill University, earning a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the latter. He later earned the equivalent of a Master's Degree in engineering from the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in London. Before entering politics, he was the CEO of McNeely Engineering, a firm which operated in the Ottawa region. He sold this firm in 1997, claiming it had suffered under provincial cutbacks to infrastructure spending.

Municipal politics[edit]

In 2000, McNeely was elected as a municipal councillor for the Cumberland Ward of the amalgamated City of Ottawa, defeating incumbent Robert van den Ham.[1] In 2002, he played a key role in the hugely successful Hay West project, in which hay from eastern Canada was shipped to the drought-stricken west.[2] He was also active in opposing the creation of a hog farm in the village of Sarsfield part of the Cumberland Ward of Ottawa.[3]

Provincial politics[edit]

In the provincial election of 2003, he defeated incumbent Progressive Conservative Brian Coburn in Ottawa—Orleans by about 4500 votes.[4] He was named a government whip on October 23, 2003.[5]

In July 2006, McNeely described Israel as a "rogue state", arguing that Israel's military campaign in Lebanon was resulting in collective punishment for the Lebanese people. Dalton McGuinty expressed "serious dismay and disappointment" for these remarks, and McNeely later offered an apology for the language of his comments.[6]

He was re-elected to the provincial legislature in 2007, beating Conservative candidate Graham Fox by almost 9,000 votes.[7] In the 2011 election he was re-elected with a margin of 2,854 votes.[8]

In 2005, McNeely proposed an amendment to a no smoking bill that would ban power wall cigarette advertising from convenience stores and retail businesses. The "McNeely Amendment", which came into effect on May 31, 2008, has helped keep cigarettes out of the sight of children.[9]

During his time in office, McNeely has served as Parliamentary Assistant to a number of ministers including Minister of Transportation, Minister of Health and Long Term Care and most recently as PA to the Minister of the Environment.

In 2014, McNeely announced that he would not seek re-election in the 2014 contest.[10]

Electoral record[edit]

Ontario general election, 2011 : Ottawa—Orleans
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Phil McNeely 21,857 46.44 -6.42 $ 86,835.18
Progressive Conservative Andrew Lister 19,003 40.38 +5.97 57,251.00
New Democratic Doug McKercher 4,979 10.58 +4.22 1,389.28
Green Tanya Gutmanis 886 1.88 -2.68 0.00
Freedom David McGruer 183 0.39 +0.01 0.00
Libertarian David Paul 154 0.33   82.01
Total valid votes / Expense Limit 47,062 100.00 -3.01 $ 106,791.79
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 179 0.38 -0.05
Turnout 47,241 52.65 -5.21
Eligible voters 89,726   +6.53
Liberal hold Swing -6.20
Ontario general election, 2007 : Ottawa—Orleans
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Phil McNeely 25,649 52.86 +2.50 $ 67,961.00
Progressive Conservative Graham Fox 16,695 34.41 -6.91 81,527.51
New Democratic Andrée Germain 3,088 6.36 +0.83 1,922.66
Green Akbar Manoussi 2,214 4.56 +1.77 4,719.58
Family Coalition Jeremy Atkinson 692 1.43   3,538.98
Freedom David McGruer 183 0.38   0.00
Total valid votes/Expense Limit 48,521 100.0   -3.43 $ 90,965.16
Total rejected ballots 209 0.43 +0.04
Turnout 48,730 57.86 -5.53
Eligible voters 84,227   +5.85
Ontario general election, 2003 : Ottawa—Orleans
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Phil McNeely 25,300 50.36 +9.92 $ 66,785.00
Progressive Conservative Brian Coburn 20,762 41.32 -13.24 73,997.09
New Democratic Ric Dagenais 2,778 5.53 +2.85 11,889.14
Green Melanie Ransom 1,402 2.79 +1.41 1,069.07
Total valid votes/Expense Limit 50,242 100.0   +2.23 $ 76,391.04
Total rejected ballots 197 0.39 -0.17
Turnout 50,439 63.39 -4.70
Eligible voters 79,574   +11.69

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quan, Douglas (November 14, 2000). "Ward 19: Cumberland: Political neophyte McNeely stuns two incumbents". The Ottawa Citizen. p. B7. 
  2. ^ Farrell, Jim (August 21, 2002). "Shipping hay west too costly: Government's $2.2M would be better spent on southern Alberta hay". The Ottawa Citizen. p. A5. 
  3. ^ Anderson, Elliott (May–Jun 2002). "The big stink: Canadian hog farmers are finding that, more and more, they have to go big or go out of business" 35 (6). This. pp. 16–19. 
  4. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. October 2, 2003. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  5. ^ Lindgren, April (October 24, 2003). "McGuinty freezes auto premiums: Newly sworn-in premier quickly keeps election promise". The Ottawa Citizen. p. A1. 
  6. ^ "MPP calls Israel 'rogue' state". Ottawa Citizen. July 20, 2006. 
  7. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for Each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. October 10, 2007. p. 11 (xx). Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  8. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for Each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. October 6, 2011. p. 12. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  9. ^ "McNeely amendment strengthens Smoke-Free Ontario Act". Canada NewsWire. May 3, 2005. p. 1. 
  10. ^ "Two veteran Ontario politicians say they won't run in next election". The Canadian Press. February 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]