Philip Anthony-Rodriguez

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Philip Anthony-Rodriguez
Born March 10, 1968
Brooklyn, New York, United States[1]
Occupation Actor

Philip Anthony-Rodriguez is an American actor and voice actor known for his roles on Jake 2.0 as Kyle Duarte and the voice of disc jockey Maurice Chavez in the 2002 video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City.

In November of 1990, Philip originated the role of Ritchie Valens in the Broadway Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story.[2] He provided the voice of the male version of protagonist SPARTAN-B312 in the 2010 video game Halo: Reach. He is the voice of Jetstream Sam in Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance. He also played Dr. Evans in Madea's Big Happy Family. He recurred for Six Seasons as Ruben Enriquez in the ABC Family television series The Secret Life of the American Teenager. He played Nelson in film The Ode and had a guest role on the Disney Channel show Hannah Montana in 2009 and played a lawyer on Castle in 2010. In 2011, he guest-starred on the Disney Channel show Shake It Up (season 1, episode 18: "Model It Up") as designer Napoleon Fontaine and in 2013 on Modern Family in the episode "The Big Game", and in 2014 as Mr. Eloquence on The Real Husbands of Hollywood. Anthony-Rodriguez voices the role of Nick Mendozain in video game Battlefield Hardline.

Early Life: Anthony-Rodriguez was born to parents Maximo and Veronica (née Burgos) on March 10, 1968. The youngest of five children, he began acting, singing and doing voices when he was very little. At age 11, he started working with Acting by Children, a young people's performing group in New York City founded by Jeanne Niederlitz. As a result of his talent and look, the management group Niederlitz and Steele signed him and began representing him in talent auditions. Philip began working almost immediately and has been a busy working actor for over four decades. Raised in a bilingual household has enabled Philip to work in the business in both English and Spanish.

References[edit]

http://www.nytimes.com/1981/03/13/theater/for-children-for-children-st-patrick-s-day.html

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