Philip Bloom (filmmaker)

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Philip Bloom
Philipbloomfilmmaker2.jpg
Philip Bloom at the London Meet-up in 2010
Born (1971-05-20) May 20, 1971 (age 43)
Occupation Filmmaker, Cinematographer
Known for DSLR Filmmaking, Digital Cinematography
Website
http://www.philipbloom.net/

Philip Bloom is a British filmmaker known for his DSLR filmmaking, blog and workshops. He has worked as a cinematographer for Lucasfilm,[1] Sky and the BBC.

Career[edit]

He began his filmmaking career at Sky, travelling the world as a cameraman. His recent credits include work with Lucasfilm,[2] Discovery HD, Five, Living, Sky One, and more.[3]

In 2009 he was called up by Rick McCallum to help shoot with Canon DSLRs on the set of Lucasfilm's Red Tails.[4]

Bloom's 2011 documentary film How to Start a Revolution about Nobel Peace Prize nominee Gene Sharp premiered at the 27th annual Boston Film Festival and won Best Documentary, as well as the Mass Impact Award. It also won Best Documentary at the Raindance Film Festival.[5]

In 2012 he was the first cameraman using the novel Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 of the Micro Four Thirds system creating the film Genesis.[6]

In 2013, Bloom created a short film for the "Pro Photographer, Cheap Camera Challenge" (created by website DigitalRev TV) in which photographers and filmmakers, who are used to working with advanced and expensive gear, are given cheap, often very low quality equipment to create an original work. Bloom was instructed to create a short film using the Video Girl Barbie, a Barbie doll released in 2010 which features an embedded video camera in its chest, boasting a 1.2MP camera and 240p recorded video.[7]

References[edit]