Philip McBride

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The Right Honourable
Sir Philip McBride
KCMG
Philip McBride.jpg
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Grey
In office
19 December 1931 – 21 September 1937
Preceded by Andrew Lacey
Succeeded by Oliver Badman
Senator for South Australia
In office
21 October 1937 – 30 June 1944
Preceded by Oliver Badman
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Wakefield
In office
28 September 1946 – 14 October 1958
Preceded by Albert Smith
Succeeded by Bert Kelly
Personal details
Born (1892-06-18)18 June 1892
Died 14 July 1982(1982-07-14) (aged 90)
Nationality Australian
Political party UAP (1931–44)
Liberal (1944–58)

Sir Philip Albert Martin McBride KCMG (18 June 1892 – 14 July 1982) was an Australian politician.

McBride was born into a well-known pastoral family[1] and educated at Burra Public School and Prince Alfred College in Adelaide. In 1931, he was elected as the member for Grey in the Australian House of Representatives, representing the United Australia Party. Before the 1937 general election, he struck a deal with fellow grazier and Country Party senator, A. O. Badman, who resigned from the Senate and contested Grey, which he won. McBride was elected by a joint sitting of both Houses of the South Australian parliament to fill the resulting casual Senate vacancy.[2]

McBride was Assistant Minister for Commerce from April 1939 to August 1940. He was Minister for the Army and Minister for Repatriation from March to October 1940 in Robert Menzies ministry. In the third Menzies Ministry, he was Minister for Supply and Development from October 1940 to June 1941 and Minister for Munitions from October 1940 to the defeat of the Menzies government in August 1941. He was defeated in the 1943 general election.[3]

In the 1946 general election, he was elected as the member for Wakefield for the Liberal Party of Australia and held it to his retirement in 1958, as a member of the Liberal and Country League from 1951. Following the election of the Manzies government in 1949, he became Minister for the Interior from 1949 to 1950. In 1950, he was appointed Minister for Defence, a position he retained to his retirement.[3]

After McBride's retirement, he was Federal President of the Liberal Party from 1960 to 1965. He was survived by his widow and two of his sons.[3]

Honours[edit]

McBride was made a Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George in 1953 and made a Privy counsellor in 1959.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Laurie, Wallis (17 August 1982). "Death of Right Honourable Sir Philip McBride, P.C., K.C.M.G.". Hansard. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 17 October 2007. 
  2. ^ Lee, David. "McBride, Sir Philip Albert (1892–1982)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Retrieved 24 September 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d Fraser, Malcolm (17 August 1982). "Death of Right Honourable Sir Philip McBride, P.C., K.C.M.G.". Hansard. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 17 October 2007. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Geoffrey Street
Minister for the Army
1940
Succeeded by
Percy Spender
Minister for Repatriation
1940
Succeeded by
George McLeay
Preceded by
Robert Menzies
Minister for Munitions
1940–41
Succeeded by
Norman Makin
Preceded by
Frederick Stewart
Minister for Supply and Development
1940–41
Succeeded by
George McLeay
Preceded by
Herbert Johnson
Minister for the Interior
1950
Succeeded by
Eric Harrison
Preceded by
Eric Harrison
Minister for Defence
1950–58
Succeeded by
Athol Townley
Preceded by
Thomas White
Minister for Air
1951
Succeeded by
William McMahon
Preceded by
Josiah Francis
Minister for the Navy
1951
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Andrew Lacey
Member for Grey
1931–37
Succeeded by
Oliver Badman
Preceded by
Albert Smith
Member for Wakefield
1946–58
Succeeded by
Bert Kelly