Photo-essay

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Main article: Essay

A photo-essay (or photographic essay) is a set or series of photographs that are intended to tell a story or evoke a series of emotions in the viewer. A photo essay will often show pictures in deep emotional stages. Photo essays range from purely photographic works to photographs with captions or small notes to full text essays with a few or many accompanying photographs. Photo essays can be sequential in nature, intended to be viewed in a particular order, or they may consist of non-ordered photographs which may be viewed all at once or in an order chosen by the viewer.[citation needed] People who have undertaken photo essays include Bruce Davidson, W. Eugene Smith, Walker Evans, James Agee, David Alan Harvey, and André Kertész.[original research?]

"After School Play Interrupted by the Catch and Release of a Stingray" is a simple time-sequence photo essay
  • An article in a publication, sometimes a full page or a two-page spread. Newspapers and news magazines often have multi-page photo essays about significant events, both good and bad, such as a sports championship or a national disaster.
  • A book or other complete publication.
  • A web page or portion of a web site.
  • A single montage or collage of photographic images, with text or other additions, intended to be viewed both as a whole and as individual photographs. Such a work may also fall in the category of mixed media.
  • An art show which is staged at a particular time and location. Some such shows also fall in the category of installation art.
  • A slide show or similar presentation, possibly with spoken text, which could be delivered on slides, on DVD, or on a web site.
  • In fashion publishing especially, a photo-editorial – an editorial-style article dominated by or entirely consisting of a series of thematic photographs

See also[edit]