Piaggio P.148

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Piaggio P.148
Italian Air Force Piaggio P.148.jpg
Role two-seat primary/aerobatic trainer
National origin Italy
Manufacturer Piaggio Aero
First flight 1951
Primary users Italian Air Force
Somali Air Corps
Number built 100+
Variants Piaggio P.149

The Piaggio P.148 was an 1950s Italian two-seat primary or aerobatic training monoplane designed and built by Piaggio Aero.

Design and development[edit]

The P.148 is an all-metal low-wing cantilever monoplane with fixed tailwheel landing gear. It offers room for two occupants in side-by-side seating as well as an optional third seat. The prototype first flew on the 12 February 1951 and after testing by the Italian Air Force was ordered into production for the air force primary training schools. A four-seat variant was developed as the P.149.

Operational history[edit]

Although successfully introduced into the Italian Air Force service, the P.148 was withdrawn from use with the introduction of an all-jet training programme. In 1970, the aircraft was re-introduced into the Italian Air Force Service, when the basic piston-engine aircraft regained a role in the selection of pilots. Some aircraft were sold by the Air Force to the Somali Air Corps as trainers.

Operators[edit]

 Italy
 Somalia

Specifications (P.148)[edit]

Data from The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985), 1985, Orbis Publishing, Page 2714

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 8.44 m (27 ft 8¼ in)
  • Wingspan: 11.12 m (36 ft 5¾ in)
  • Height: 2.40 m (7 ft 10½ in)
  • Wing area: 18.85 m2 (202.91 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 876 kg (1,931 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,280 kg (2,822 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-435-A flat-six piston engine, 142 kW (190 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 234 km/h (145 mph)
  • Range: 925 km (575 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 5,000 m (16,404 ft)

See also[edit]

Related development

References[edit]

  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985), 1985, Orbis Publishing, Page 2714

External links[edit]