Pico de gallo

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Pico de gallo

In Mexican cuisine, pico de gallo (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈpiko ðe ˈɣaʎo], literally rooster's beak), also called salsa fresca, is a fresh, uncooked salad made from chopped tomato, onion, coriander leaves, fresh serranos (but jalapeños or habaneros too), salt, and key lime juice. Other ingredients may also be added, such as shrimp, vienna sausage or squid, avocado, lime juice or apple cider vinegar, cucumber, radish or firm fruit such as mango.

It´s a basic for many dishes as tacos and grills, is considered a perfect filling to corn tortillas but fried tortilla chips is an option, can be transformed easily into guacamole but is not replaced by this.

Pico de gallo can be used in much the same way as other Mexican liquid salsas, Kenyan kachumbari, or Indian chutneys, but since it contains less liquid, it can also be used as a main ingredient in dishes such as tacos and fajitas. Paradoxically the softness and humidity in vegetables used in pico de gallo pairs perfectly with dryness in rind tacos.

The tomato-based variety is widely known as salsa picada (minced/chopped sauce). In Mexico it is sometimes called salsa mexicana (Mexican sauce). Because the colors of the red tomato, white onion, coriander and green chili are reminiscent of the colors of the Mexican flag, it is also sometimes called salsa bandera (flag sauce).

In many regions of Mexico the term refers to any of a variety of salads (including fruit salads), salsa, or fillings made with tomato, tomatillo, avocado, melon, orange, jícama, cucumber, papaya, or mild chilis. The ingredients are tossed in lime juice and either hot sauce or chamoy, then sprinkled with a salty chili powder.

Etymology[edit]

According to food writer Sharon Tyler Herbst,[1] pico de gallo ("rooster's beak") is named thus because originally people ate it by pinching pieces between the thumb and forefinger.

In their book Authentic Mexican: Regional Cooking from the Heart of Mexico, Rick Bayless and Deann Groen speculate that the name might allude to the bird feed-like texture and appearance of the mince.[2]

Despite these interpretations name seems to be a metaphor to the fact it bite your mouth because of chilli content, or the preparations involves just finely cutting and chopped (picar) infinitely ingredients, is thus a quick recipe. Some people use the expression pico de gallo meaning that something is not an easy task: It`s not pico de gallo.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sharon Tyler Herbst, "Food Lover's Companion", 2nd ed., as quoted in Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995: www.Epicurious.com, retrieved 10/3/2007 [1]
  2. ^ Bayless, Rick; Groen, Deann. Authentic Mexican: Regional Cooking from the Heart of Mexico.

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