Pietenpol Sky Scout

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Air Scout
Role amateur-built airplane
National origin United States
Manufacturer Pietenpol
Designer Bernard Pietenpol
First flight 1933
Developed from Pietenpol Air Camper

The Pietenpol Sky Scout is a parasol wing homebuilt aircraft designed by Bernard H. Pietenpol.[1]

Development[edit]

The Sky Scout was a lower cost follow-on to the Pietenpol's first homebuilt design, the Pietenpol Air Camper. Using a lower cost Ford Model T engine, rather than the more current Ford Model A engine of the time. The aircraft was redesigned for the heavier, lower power engine by reducing it to a single person aircraft. The new pilot location required a section called a "flop" to be installed, essentially a section of the wing that was hinged up to allow the pilot to stand up when getting into and out of the aircraft.[2]

The aircraft was designed to be built of spruce and plywood. The drawings were published in the 1933 Mechanix Illustrated magazine.

On display[edit]

Variants[edit]

  • Claude Sessions developed a finned head modification on his Sky Scout for lighter weight air-cooling. The engine was featured in Modern Mechanics magazine in 1931 and formed the basis for the American Flea Corporation Universal 50-60 engine.[4]
  • Pietenpol Air Camper

Specifications (Pietenpol Sky Scout)[edit]

Data from Sport Aviation

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Length: 16 ft 3 in (4.95 m)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 3 in (8.31 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 5 in (2.57 m)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Ford Model T engine Inline four cylnder piston
  • Propellers: 2-bladed

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 54 kn; 100 km/h (62 mph)
  • Cruise speed: 48 kn; 89 km/h (55 mph)
  • Stall speed: 30 kn; 56 km/h (35 mph)
  • Rate of climb: 200 ft/min (1.0 m/s)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mechanix Illustrated magazine. 1933. 
  2. ^ Sport Aviation. March 1958. 
  3. ^ "Pietenpol Air Scout". Retrieved 16 April 2011. 
  4. ^ Sport Aviation. February 1960. 

External links[edit]