Pilish

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Pilish is a style of writing in which the lengths of consecutive words match the digits of the number π (pi).

Examples[edit]

The following sentence is an example which matches the first fifteen digits of π:

How I need a drink, alcoholic in nature, after the heavy lectures involving quantum mechanics!

The following Pilish poem (written by Joseph Shipley) matches the first 31 digits of π:

But a time I spent wandering in bloomy night;
Yon tower, tinkling chimewise, loftily opportune.
Out, up, and together came sudden to Sunday rite,
The one solemnly off to correct plenilune.

A full-length Pilish novel has been published,[1] which currently holds the record of the longest Pilish text with 10,000 digits.

Rule sets[edit]

In order to deal with occurrences of the digit zero, the following rule set was introduced (referred to as Basic Pilish):

In Basic Pilish, each word of n letters represents
(1) The digit n if n < 10
(2) The digit 0 if n = 10

Since long runs of small non-zero digits are difficult to deal with naturally (such as 1121 or 1111211), another rule set called Standard Pilish was introduced:

In Standard Pilish, each word of n letters represents
(1) The digit n if n < 10
(2) The digit 0 if n = 10
(3) Two consecutive digits if n > 10
(for example, a 12-letter word represents the digits 1,2)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Keith, Michael (2010). Not A Wake. Vinculum Press. ISBN 0-9630097-1-0. 

External links[edit]