Pimenta racemosa

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Pimenta racemosa
Myrcia acris.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Pimenta
Species: P. racemosa
Binomial name
Pimenta racemosa
(Mill.) J.W.Moore
Synonyms[1]
  • Amomis acris (Sw.) O.Berg
  • Amomis anisomera Urb. & Ekman
  • Amomis caryophyllata Krug & Urb.
  • Amomis grisea (Kiaersk.) Britton
  • Amomis hispaniolensis Urb.
  • Amomis oblongata O.Berg
  • Amomis ozua Urb. & Ekman
  • Amomis pauciflora Urb.
  • Amomis pimento O.Berg
  • Amomis pimentoides O.Berg
  • Eugenia tabasco (Willd. ex Schltdl. & Cham.) G.Don
  • Myrcia acris (Sw.) DC.
  • Myrcia pimentoides DC.
  • Myrtus acris Sw.
  • Myrtus caryophyllata Jacq. nom. illeg.
  • Myrtus citrifolia Poir.
  • Myrtus pimentoides (DC.) T.Nees
  • Pimenta acris (Sw.) Kostel.
  • Pimenta acuminata Bello
  • Pimenta anisomera (Urb. & Ekman) Burret
  • Pimenta citrifolia (Poir.) Kostel.
  • Pimenta crenulata Alain
  • Pimenta hispaniolensis (Urb.) Burret
  • Pimenta officinalis var. cumanensis O. Berg
  • Pimenta ozua (Urb. & Ekman) Burret
  • Pimenta pauciflora (Urb.) Burret
  • Pimenta pimento Griseb.
  • Pimenta tabasco (Willd. ex Schltdl. & Cham.) Lundell
  • Pimenta terebinthina Burret
  • Pimentus cotinifolia Raf.

Pimenta racemosa is a species of plant in the myrtle family (Myrtaceae) that is native to the Caribbean region. Common names include West Indian bay tree,[2] bay rum tree,[2] and ciliment. It is used in cooking and an essential oil is distilled to produce a fragrant cologne called bay rum; although bay rum is essentially rum, the concentrated essential oil is toxic and renders the product undrinkable.[3] The tree is 4-12 m tall and the white flowers, about 10mm wide, become black, oval fruits measuring 7-12 mm.[4] The plants are now grown widely in other tropical areas, including Oceania. The ideal conditions for P. racemosa are regular irrigation and bright sunshine.

Ecology[edit]

Pimenta racemosa is widely introduced, and can become an invasive weed.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Plant List: A Working List of all Plant Species". 
  2. ^ a b "Taxon: Pimenta racemosa (Mill.) J. W. Moore". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 1997-05-22. Retrieved 2012-08-23. 
  3. ^ desert-tropicals.com: West Indian Bay Tree, Bay Rum Tree
  4. ^ a b Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER): Myrtaceae: Pimenta racemosa (by J.W.Moore)
  5. ^ "USDA PLANTS Profile". 

External links[edit]

Data related to Pimenta racemosa at Wikispecies Media related to Pimenta racemosa at Wikimedia Commons