Pinoleville Pomo Nation

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Pinoleville Pomo Nation
Pinoleville Rancheria Pomo girl.jpg
Pat, a young Pomo girl at the grape harvest at Pinolville Rancheria, 1938
Total population
280[1]
Regions with significant populations
United States (California)
Languages
English, Pomoan languages
Religion
Roundhouse religion, Christianity, Kuksu
Related ethnic groups
Pomo tribes

The Pinoleville Pomo Nation is a federally recognized tribe of Pomo people in Mendocino County, California.[2] Leona Williams currently serves as Tribal Chairperson.[3]

Reservation[edit]

The Pinoleville Pomo Nation's reservation is the Pinoleville Rancheria. The primary parcel of land occupies 99 acres (400,000 m2) in Mendocino County, and approximately 70 tribal members reside there.[2] A second parcel, located in Lake County, is 6.7 acres (27,000 m2) large. The tribe is trying to place this second parcel into trust and develop it with housing.[4] The Rancheria was terminated by the US Federal Government but it was restored in the 1980s.[5]

History[edit]

The Pomo who became the Pinoleville Band lived in northern Ukiah Valley, but their ancestral lands were overrun by non-native settlers in the mid-19th century. Their reservation was established in 1911 by the US Federal Government but was terminated in 1966 under the California Rancheria Act. They quickly lost 50% of their land base. In 1979 the Pinoleville Band joined Tillie Hardwick v. the United States, a class action suit that was decided in favor of the tribes. The Pinoleville Pomo were able to regain federal recognition and restore their original reservation to trust status.[1]

The tribe conducts business from Ukiah, California.[6]

Tribal services and projects[edit]

Pinoleville Pomo Nation operated a housing program, an environmental department, Head Start, vocational training, and an historic preservation office.[3]

In order to improve diets and the local environment the Pinoleville Pomo Nation created a horticultural program, which focuses on tribal youth — educating them about plants, to improve self-esteem and provide skills. Pinole Nation Gardens include a greenhouse, orchards, two gardens, and native plant restoration areas and are located in Ukiah.[7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b History of the Pinoleville Band. Pinoleville.org. (retrieved 2 August 2009)
  2. ^ a b California Indians and Their Reservations. San Diego State University Library and Information Access. 2009 (retrieved 2 August 2009)
  3. ^ a b Pinoleville Pomo Nation Contact Page. Pinoleville Tribal Government. (retrieved 2 August 2009)
  4. ^ Pinoleville: A Geographical Orientation. Pinoleville Tribal Government. (retrieved 2 August 2009)
  5. ^ Pritzker, 140
  6. ^ California Tribes and Organizations. 500 Nations. (retrieved 2 August 2009)
  7. ^ Pinoleville Pomo Nation: Horticultural Initiative. Gardens Project: The Real Dirt. (retrieved 2 Aug 2009)

References[edit]

  • Pritzker, Barry M. A Native American Encyclopedia: History, Culture, and Peoples. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. ISBN 978-0-19-513877-1

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°10′49″N 123°13′04″W / 39.18028°N 123.21778°W / 39.18028; -123.21778