Piper chaba

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Piper chaba
Piper chaba BotGardBln1105Z.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Magnoliids
Order: Piperales
Family: Piperaceae
Genus: Piper
Species: P. chaba
Binomial name
Piper chaba
Trel. & Yunck.

Piper chaba is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae that is native to South and Southeast Asia. P. chaba is called Chui Jhal or Choi Jhal in the south-western districts of Bangladesh. P. chaba is found throughout India, and other warmer regions of Asia including Malayasia, Indonesia, Singapore and Sri Lanka.

It is a creeper plant that spreads on the ground. It may also grow around large trees. The leaves are oval-shaped and about 2 to 3 inches long. The flowers are monoceous and blossom during the monsoon. The fruit looks similar to other varieties of long pepper, with an elongated shape that can grow up to 3 inches long. The fruit is red when ripe, which turns dark brown or black when dry.

Culinary use[edit]

People in Bangladesh's south-western districts like Khulna, Jessore, Bagerhat and Shatkhira cut down the stem, roots, peel the skin and chop it into small pieces - and cook them with meat and fish, especially with mutton. They love the spicy pungent flavor of Choi Jhal year round. In Thailand, P. chaba is known commonly as "Dee Plee" and also referred to as "Thai long pepper" and it is consumed both in fresh and dried forms. Ground by mortar and pestle, P. chaba is an ingredient in a variety of Thai sauces and pastes, and it is added to soups to mute excessively strong fish flavors.

In Bangladesh, the stems of the plant are used as a spice in meat and fish dishes. In most countries of South and South-East Asia, the fruit of the Piperaceae vines is well known as a spice and is called the "long pepper". However, in Bangladesh the use of Choi Jhal is unique, because the twigs, stems or roots of P. chaba – not the fruit – are used as a spice. It is a relatively expensive spice in Bangladesh, and the roots are usually more expensive than the stems because of their stronger aroma. The taste is similar to horseradish.


External links[edit]

To learn its medicinal properties, this link can be helpful: http://www.ewubd.edu/~faiz/piper_paper.pdf

Media related to Piper chaba at Wikimedia Commons