Piperoxan

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Piperoxan
Piperoxan.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-ylmethyl)piperidine
Clinical data
Legal status
  • Uncontrolled
Routes Oral
Identifiers
CAS number 59-39-2
135-87-5 (hydrochloride)
ATC code None
PubChem CID 6040
ChemSpider 5817
UNII 9ZCS27634Y YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL31836
Chemical data
Formula C14H19NO2 
Mol. mass 233.31 g/mol

Piperoxan, also known as benodaine, is a drug which was the very first antihistamine to be discovered.[1][2] This compound, derived from benzodioxan, was prepared in the early 1930s by Daniel Bovet and Ernest Fourneau at the Pasteur Institute in France.[1][2] Formerly investigated by Fourneau as an α-adrenergic-blocking agent, they demonstrated that it also antagonized histamine-induced bronchospasm in guinea pigs, and published their findings in 1933.[1][2][3] Bovet went on to win the 1957 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his contribution,[4] and one of their students, Anne-Marie Staub, published the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of antihistamines in 1939.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Scriabine, Alexander; Landau, Ralph; Achilladelis, Basil (1999). Pharmaceutical innovation: revolutionizing human health. Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Press. ISBN 0-941901-21-1. 
  2. ^ a b c Williams, David H.; Lemke, Thomas L.; Foye, William O. (2008). Foye's principles of medicinal chemistry. Hagerstwon, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-6879-9. 
  3. ^ Fourneau, Ernest; Bovet, Daniel (1933). "Recherches sur l'action sympathicolytique d'un nouveau dérivé du dioxane". Archives Internationales de Pharmacodynamie et de Thérapie 46: 178–91. ISSN 0003-9780. 
  4. ^ "Daniel Bovet - Biography".