Pisa–Livorno–Rome railway

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The Pisa–Rome railway is one of the trunk lines of the Italian railway network. It connects Italy’s northwest with its south, running along the Tyrrhenian coast between the Italian regions of Tuscany and Lazio, through the provinces of Pisa, Livorno, Grosseto, Viterbo and Rome. The line is double track and is fully electrified at 3,000 V DC. Passenger traffic is managed by Trenitalia.

History[edit]

The southernmost section of the line between Rome and Civitavecchia was opened on 24 April 1859 by the Società Pio Central (Italian for Central Pius Company).[1] The northernmost section between Pisa and Livorno was opened on 13 March 1844 as part of the Leopolda railway between Florence and Pisa.[2] In 1862 work started on a line south from Livorno, which initially ran east to Collesalvetti before turning south and joining the path of the current Pisa–Rome line at Vada (now 27 km south of Livorno). This route is now known as the Maremmana railway. The line continued south from Vada and was opened to Nunziatella, near Capalbio, on the border with the Papal States on the Chiarone river in 1864. In 1865 the Leopolda railway was taken over by the owner of the Rome–Civitavecchia railway, now called the Società per le Strade Ferrate Romane (Roman Railways). It opened the connecting section between Civitavecchia and Capalbio in 1867.[3] In 1910 a direct line was opened along the coast from Vada to the new central station at Livorno.

From Genoa and Lucca
From Florence
80+848 Pisa Centrale
To Vada (goods)
To Pisa Airport
86+942 Mortellini junction
Autostrada A12E80
90+452 Tombolo
From Collesalvetti
96+094
31+459
Livorno Calambrone
To Livorno San Marco
27+766 Livorno Centrale
Ardenza
21+055 Antignano
14+425 Quercianella–Sonnino
7+651 Castiglioncello
4+722 Rosignano
From Collesalvetti
0+000
287+519
Vada
Linea per Volterra
281+592 Cecina
Bibbona - Casale
273+718 Bolgheri
265+128 Castagneto Carducci
257+353 San Vincenzo
Linea per Piombino
246+752 Campiglia Marittima
Highway SS398 Via AureliaPiombino
238+149 Vignale–Riotorto
From Massa Marittima (dismantled)
229+555 Follonica
222+683 Scarlino
214+659 Gavorrano
Ribolla mining railway
206+600 Giuncarico
From Siena
199+410 Montepescali
187+644 Grosseto
Rispescia
173+141 Alberese
164+347 Talamone
156+421 Albinia
149+923 Orbetello–Monte Argentario
To Porto Santo Stefano (dismantled)
137+645 Capalbio
131+057 Chiarone
115+941 Montalto di Castro
100+575 Tarquinia
From Orte (dismantled)
From Civitavecchia port
80+678 Civitavecchia
71+779 Santa Marinella
62+312 Santa Severa
54+287 Marina di Cerveteri
50+297 Cerveteri–Ladispoli
From Ladispoli
47+944 Palo Laziale
40+975 Torre in Pietra - Palidoro
34+175
31+070
MaccareseFregene
Old route via Ponte Galeria
Autostrada A12 - E80
Grande Raccordo Anulare
17+041 Roma Aurelia
From Viterbo
From Vatican City
11+542 Roma San Pietro
From Fiumicino
8+221 Roma Trastevere
Tiber River
Rome–Lido line
Metro line B
6+692 Roma Ostiense
3+082 Roma Tuscolana
To Naples (via Formia and Cassino), Velletri, Albano and Frascati
To Florence and Florence (high-speed)
From Naples (via Formia and Cassino), Velletri, Albano and Frascati
From Florence, Florence (high-speed), Pescara and Naples (high-speed)
0+000 Roma Termini

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Kalla-Bishop, P. M. (1971). Italian Railways. Newton Abbott, Devon, England: David & Charles. 

See also[edit]