Piscaethces

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Piscaethces
Game background
Title(s) The Blood Queen
Home plane Baator (or wanders)
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful evil
Portfolio Domination, oppression
Domains 2nd edition spheres: All, Charm, Divination, Elemental (Air, Earth, Water), Guardian, Law, Protection, Summoning, Sun (reversed, minor access only), and Weather.
Superior None
Design details

Piscaethces the Blood Queen is the aboleth deity of domination and oppression, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Her symbol is a sphere of mucus surrounded by droplets of the same substance.

Creative origins[edit]

Piscaethces was first introduced in Night Below by Carl Sargent, where she was called simply the Blood Queen.[1] She was given the name "Pisaethces" in Drizzt Do'Urden's Guide to the Underdark by Eric L. Boyd.[2] Lords of Madness named her Piscaethces and interpreted her as a Lovecraftian elder rather than a traditional god.[3]

Description[edit]

Piscaethces is portrayed as a gigantic, bloated aboleth with no tentacles, surrounded by mucus the color of blood.

Relationships[edit]

The Blood Queen is allied with Kiaransalee and opposed by Callarduran Smoothhands, Laduguer, Lolth, and Vhaeraun. Ilxendren, lesser god of the ixzan, both respects and fears Piscaethces and her creations. Juiblex and Tharizdun are occasional rivals for aboleth devotion, but Piscaethces cares nothing for this.

Other Elder Evils honored by the aboleths include Bolothamogg, Holashner, Shothotugg, and Y'chak.

Realm[edit]

Piscaethces is said to have a realm in Minauros on the plane of Baator, where the mucus that bleeds from her body becomes a vast bog. The aboleths themselves believe that she "travels the currents of probability between infinite realities, spreading her seed almost as an afterthought as she moves from one world to another."

Dogma[edit]

Piscaethces seeks to dominate all existence, though her interests are primarily directed in realities other than the Prime Material Plane. The aboleths teach that the Blood Queen is uncaring and unfeeling, caring nothing for her creations. She created them by accident as a by-product of the interaction between her body and the physical world; the aboleths accept and even appreciate this. They see the disinterest of their creator as a liberating condition, enabling to make their lives as they desire it, not as some extradimensional being demands.

Worshippers[edit]

Piscaethces is not worshipped, but aboleths pay her their respects.

Clergy[edit]

The closest thing to clerics of the Blood Queen among the aboleths are the savants, who cast spells both as clerics and wizards. They are the leaders of their kind, dominating it from within their great cities. They are very few in number, and it may be true that Piscaethces selects them individually.

In Lords of Madness, savant aboleths are portrayed as casters of arcane spells only, and Piscaethces is portrayed as a being too uncaring even to grant spells to her followers.

Temples[edit]

Piscaethces is honored in aboleth architecture by the inclusion of large domed windows of red crystal, and by stone murals depicting aboleths sacrificing sentient beings to the goddess as a sign of respect. Great stone altars with statues of the Blood Queen on either side are used for sacrificial rites.

Rituals[edit]

Aboleths sacrifice humans, derro, drow and other beings to honor their goddess.

Myths and legends[edit]

The Once and Future Queen[edit]

Piscaetheces left the Prime Material Plane long ago, and the aboleths do not expect her to return from her wanderings. However, they believe that if she does return, this is a sign that all of existence is circular, and therefore can be completely dominated.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sargent, Carl. Night Below: An Underdark Campaign. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1995
  2. ^ Boyd, Eric L Drizzt Do'Urden's Guide to the Underdark. Renton, WA: TSR, 1999
  3. ^ Baker, Rich, James Jacobs, and Steve Winter. Lords of Madness. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005

Additional reading[edit]