Pitcheswara Rao Atluri

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Pitcheswara Rao Atluri (1925 – 1966) was an Indian writer, and a prominent writer in the Telugu language.

Personal life[edit]

He was born in the small village of Choutapalli in Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh on April 12, 1925. Later, his family migrated to the nearby village, Pulaparru. He studied in Choutapally village and Kaikaluru schools. He was first in the Hindi 'Visharada' exams. He completed his Inter in the Hindu College.[1] He joined the Indian Navy after completing his studies in 1945. In 1948 he passed his B R W, K C G exams. He resigned from the Indian Navy in 1953.

His wife, Chouda Rani, was the youngest daughter of Tripuraneni Ramaswamy, a great Telugu poet and social reformer. Chouda Rani herself was a short story writer, and novelist.[citation needed] She started an exclusive Telugu bookstore in Madras. She died in 1996.[citation needed]

Writing career[edit]

He worked at a daily Telugu newspaper, Vishalandhra, for some time. In 1962, he moved to Madras, the present Chennai, and worked as a film screenwriter, for which he became famous.[citation needed] He translated famous works of literature from the Hindi language into Telugu-Godaan, Prathidwani, Pekamukkalu, and Gaadida Athma Kadha. Apart from translation, he wrote many stories, radio plays, sketches, and others. "Manasulo Manishi' is notable.[citation needed]

The scripts for the Gowthama Budha and Veeresalingam documentaries are examples of his unparalleled talent as a writer. They are considered[by whom?] to be rare works of art in Telugu language. Just as he was blossoming into a great film screenwriter, he died on September 26, 1966 from a heart attack.[citation needed]

Works[edit]

Some of his published works:

  • Jeevachhavaalu
  • Nethuru kadha
  • Chiranjeevulu
  • Gadavani Ninna
  • Korina varam
  • August 15na
  • Verrikaadu Vedaantham
  • Donkala vankala Manasulu
  • Sastry
  • Sabadham
  • Kadhakudu
  • Vimukti
  • Gadachina dinnalu
  • Brathakadam Theliyanivaadu
  • Oka Anubhavam

References[edit]

  1. ^ Unattributed (2011). "History of Machilipatnam". About Machilipatnam. Manakrishanazilla.com. Retrieved 4 January 2012.