Pitkeathly Wells

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Coordinates: 56°20′39″N 3°26′00″W / 56.3442°N 3.4333°W / 56.3442; -3.4333

Pitkeathly Wells
Cross Tower - geograph.org.uk - 69151.jpg
Pitkeathly Wells
Pitkeathly Wells is located in Perth and Kinross
Pitkeathly Wells
Pitkeathly Wells
 Pitkeathly Wells shown within Perth and Kinross
OS grid reference NO115178
    - Edinburgh 40 mi (64 km)  S
    - London 440 mi (710 km)  SSE
Council area Perth and Kinross
Lieutenancy area Perth and Kinross
Country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Perth
Postcode district PH2
Dialling code 01738
Police Scottish
Fire Scottish
Ambulance Scottish
EU Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament Ochil and South Perthshire
Scottish Parliament Perthshire South and Kinross-shire
List of places
UK
Scotland

Pitkeathly Wells (spelling variants: Pitcaithly, Pitceathly, Pitkethley, etc.) is a hamlet in the Perth and Kinross area of Scotland. It is north of the Ochil Hills, 2 miles south-west of Bridge of Earn. Wells in the area produced the Pitkeathly mineral waters, which were drunk and used as baths from 1785 to 1949. A Dr. Horsley once recommended their use in curing hiccups, cancer, cholera, and epilepsy. The mineral spa flourished all through the Victorian era, with baths, tea rooms, and lawns for tennis, bowls and croquet. During this time, the nearby Bridge of Earn served as a spa town for the wells. The water, which was sold in jars, could be purchased from as far away as London.

Schweppes eventually took over the springs in 1910 and subsequently bottled the water in a plant employing thirty people. In 1927, a disastrous fire ended the bottling operation. The mineral spa was closed in 1949.[1][2]

A kind of bannock is named for the town.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Overview of Pitkeathly Wells". The Gazetteer for Scotland. The Editors of the Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved 2008-10-21. 
  2. ^ Wilson, John L. "Pitkeathly Wells". Perthshire Diary. Retrieved 2008-10-24. 
  3. ^ "Pitcaithly Bannock". Practically Edible: The Web's Biggest Food Encyclopaedia. Retrieved 2008-10-18.