Places of interest in Buckinghamshire

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Buckinghamshire is most notable for its open countryside and natural features, including the Chiltern Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the River Thames.[1] The county is also home to a large quantity of historic houses, some of which are open to the public through the National Trust such as Waddesdon Manor, West Wycombe Park and Cliveden[2] and others which still act as private houses such as the Prime Minister's country retreat Chequers.[3]

Buckinghamshire is also famous as the home of various notable people from history in whose honour tourist attractions have been established. The most notable of these is the author Roald Dahl who included many local features and characters in his works.[4][5]

There are various notable sports facilities in Buckinghamshire from Adams Park in the south to the National Hockey Stadium and stadium:mk in the north, and the county is also home to the world famous Pinewood Studios.

This is a list of places of interest in the county. See List of places in Buckinghamshire for a list of settlements.

Places of interest[edit]

Key
AP Icon.svg Abbey/Priory/Cathedral
Accessible open space Accessible open space
Themepark uk icon.png Amusement/Theme Park
CL icon.svg Castle
Country Park Country Park
EH icon.svg English Heritage
Forestry commission logo.svg Forestry Commission
Heritage railway Heritage railway
Historic house Historic House
Museum (free)
Museum
Museum (free/not free)
National Trust National Trust
Drama-icon.svg Theatre
Zoo icon.jpg Zoo

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Welcome to Buckinghamshire!". Visit Buckinghamshire. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  2. ^ "The National Trust". Visit Buckinghamshire. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  3. ^ Savage, Mike (12 March 2010). "View from the new 250mph rail route". The Independent. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  4. ^ ""Roald Dahl Trail"". Visit Buckinghamshire. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  5. ^ Dale, Louise (14 August 2010). "The best family days out". The Guardian. Retrieved 2010-08-19.