Platinum sterling

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Platinum Sterling is a registered trademark name of ABI Precious Metals, Inc. The trademark covers a range of alloys whose primary constituents are platinum and silver, primarily used in jewellery.[1] The range of Platinum Sterling alloys was developed in 2003 by Marc Robinson, and its solder was created by Chuck Bennett.

Properties[edit]

The platinum is used to replace at least some of the copper present in a typical sterling silver alloy, which provides a greater light reflectivity (by refining the grain structure) and resistance to tarnish (thought to be caused by oxidation of copper) than standard sterling silver.

Platinum Sterling is a cheaper alternative to white gold.[citation needed] It is also allegedly hard wearing and very white and so does not require rhodium plating like white gold.[2]

Composition[edit]

The composition of Platinum Sterling is published; three alloys are commercially available, all containing standard 92.5% sterling silver and 1%, 3.5% or 5% platinum.[3] A small amount of gallium can also be added to the alloy to ease manufacturing.

The patent application for Platinum Sterling claims:

A metal alloy having a composition consisting essentially of 90.5–95.5% silver by weight, about 0.5–6% platinum by weight, about 0.7–4% copper by weight, about 0.1–2% gallium by weight, about 1–3% tin by weight, about 1–2.5% germanium by weight, about 0.5–4% zinc by weight, and about 0.1–0.2% silicon by weight.

[4]

The claim also states:

...the preferred embodiments of the present invention provide a metal alloy comprising about 90.5–95.5% silver, about 0.5–6% platinum, about 0.7–4% copper, and about 0.1–2% gallium. In some embodiments, the alloy further comprises about 0.5–4% zinc, about 0–0.2% silicon, about 0–0.3% boron and about 0–1.5% indium. In other embodiments, the alloy further comprises about 0–3% tin and about 0–2.5% germanium.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] ABI Precious metals marketing information for Platinum Sterling
  2. ^ [2] Spotlight on innovative metals.
  3. ^ http://www.abipreciousmetals.com/Sterling%20with%20Platinum/Sterling.htm
  4. ^ [3] Details of patent for Platinum Sterling