Platte County, Missouri

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Platte County, Missouri
Platte-courthouse.jpg
Platte County Courthouse
Map of Missouri highlighting Platte County
Location in the state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
Founded December 31, 1838
Named for Platte River or Platte Purchase
Seat Platte City
Largest city Kansas City
Area
 • Total 427.22 sq mi (1,106 km2)
 • Land 420.33 sq mi (1,089 km2)
 • Water 6.89 sq mi (18 km2), 1.61%
Population
 • (2010) 89,322
 • Density 198.8/sq mi (76.7/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.platte.mo.us

Platte County is a county located in the northwestern portion of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 89,322.[1] Its county seat is Platte City.[2] The county was organized December 31, 1838 from the Platte Purchase,[citation needed] named for the Platte River. (Platte is derived from the French word for a low, shallow, or intermittent stream.)

Platte County is part of the Kansas City, MO-KS Metropolitan Statistical Area and contains some of the city's western suburbs. Kansas City International Airport is located in the county, approximately one mile west of Interstate 29 between mile markers 12 and 15. The land for the airport was originally in an unincorporated portion of Platte County before being annexed by Platte City, and eventually Kansas City.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 U.S. Census, the county has a total area of 427.22 square miles (1,106.5 km2), of which 420.33 square miles (1,088.6 km2) (or 98.39%) is land and 6.89 square miles (17.8 km2) (or 1.61%) is water.[3]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Platte County Courthouse in Platte City was built after the original courthouse was burned with the rest of Platte City during the American Civil War. Blanche Barrow was held at the adjoining jail following a Bonnie & Clyde shootout just south of Platte City.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 8,913
1850 16,845 89.0%
1860 18,350 8.9%
1870 17,352 −5.4%
1880 17,366 0.1%
1890 16,278 −6.3%
1900 16,193 −0.5%
1910 14,429 −10.9%
1920 13,996 −3.0%
1930 13,819 −1.3%
1940 13,862 0.3%
1950 14,973 8.0%
1960 23,350 55.9%
1970 32,081 37.4%
1980 46,341 44.4%
1990 57,867 24.9%
2000 73,781 27.5%
2010 89,322 21.1%
Est. 2012 92,054 3.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 73,781 people, 29,278 households, and 20,231 families residing in the county. The population density was 176 people per square mile (68/km²). There were 30,902 housing units at an average density of 74 per square mile (28/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.45% White, 3.49% Black or African American, 0.46% Native American, 1.48% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 1.05% from other races, and 1.87% from two or more races. Approximately 3.00% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.4% were of German, 12.5% Irish, 12.2% American and 11.4% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 29,278 households out of which 34.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.00% were married couples living together, 8.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.90% were non-families. 24.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.80% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 32.60% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 8.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $55,849, and the median income for a family was $65,236. Males had a median income of $44,310 versus $31,005 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,356. About 3.30% of families and 4.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.70% of those under age 18 and 5.70% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns[edit]

Education[edit]

Public Schools[edit]

  • North Platte County R-I School DistrictDearborn
    • North Platte County Elementary School (PK-03)
    • North Platte County Intermediate School (04-06)
    • North Platte County Junior High School (07-08)
    • North Platte County High School (09-12)
  • Park Hill School DistrictKansas City
    • Park Hill Day School (K-12) – (Special Education)
    • Alfred L. Renner Elementary School (K-05)
    • Thomas B. Chinn Elementary School (K-05)
    • English Landing Elementary School (K-05)
    • Graden Elementary School (K-05)
    • Hawthorn Elementary School (K-05)
    • Line Creek Elementary School (K-05)
    • Park Hill Early Childhood Education Center (PK)
    • Prairie Point Elementary School (K-05)
    • Southeast Elementary School (K-05)
    • Tiffany Ridge Elementary School (K-05)
    • Union Chapel Elementary School (K-05)
    • Congress Middle School (07-08)
    • Lakeview Middle School (07-08)
    • Plaza Middle School (06)
    • Park Hill High School (09-12) -- within Kansas City city limits
    • Park Hill South High School (09-12) – Riverside
  • Platte County R-III School DistrictPlatte City
    • Donald D. Siegrist Elementary School (PK-03)
    • Pathfinder Elementary School (PK-02)
    • Rising Star Elementary School (K)
    • Barry Elementary School (03-08)
    • Paxton Elementary School (04-05)
    • Platte City Middle School (06-08)
    • Platte County High School (09-12)
  • West Platte County R-II School DistrictWeston
    • Central Elementary School (PK-06)
    • West Platte County High School (07-12)

Private Schools[edit]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

The Republican Party controls politics at the local level in Platte County. Republicans hold all of the elected positions in the county. However, Governor Jay Nixon carried the county in his two successful elections, and in 2004, Claire McCaskill of Jackson County narrowly won a majority of the county's votes over Republican victor Matt Blunt.

Platte County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor David Cox Republican
County Clerk Joan Harms Republican
Collector Sheila Palmer Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Jason Brown Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Beverlee Roper Republican
Commissioner
(District 2)
Duane Soper Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Eric Zahnd Republican
Public Administrator Toni Clemens Republican
Recorder Gloria Boyer Republican
Sheriff Mark Owen Republican
Treasurer Rob Willard Republican

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2008 42.51% 19,417 55.23% 25,228 2.26% 1,032
2004 48.31% 20,137 50.31% 20,970 1.32% 577
2000 50.23% 16,971 47.69% 16,115 2.08% 703
1996 36.40% 10,581 61.37% 17,840 2.23% 647

Platte County is divided into three legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives, all of which are held by Republicans.

Missouri House of Representatives - District 29 – Platte County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Galen Wayne Higdon, Jr. 710 54.32
Democratic Bill Caldwell 597 45.68
  • District 30 – Nick Marshall (R-Parkville). Consists of the communities of Camden Point, Dearborn, Edgerton, Farley, Ferrelview, Platte City, Ridgely, Tracy, Weatherby Lake, and a small portion of the city of Kansas City.
Missouri House of Representatives - District 30 – Platte County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Nick Marshall 8,888 59.52
Democratic Lexi Norris 6,044 40.48
  • District 32 – Ron Schieber (R-Kansas City). Consists of the communities of Houston Lake, Lake Waukomis, Northmoor, Parkville, Platte Woods, Riverside, and less than a tenth of the city of Kansas City.
Missouri House of Representatives - District 32 – Platte County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Ron Schieber 7,441 50.59
Democratic Jason Grill 7,267 49.41

All of Platte County is a part of Missouri’s 34th District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Rob Schaaf (R-St. Joseph).

Missouri Senate - District 34 – Platte County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rob Schaaf 18,885 61.53
Democratic Martin T. Rucker 11,805 38.47

Federal[edit]

All of Platte County is included in Missouri’s 6th Congressional District and is currently represented by Sam Graves (R-Tarkio) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. House of Representatives – Missouri’s 6th Congressional District – Platte County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sam Graves 21,087 68.16
Democratic Clint Hylton 9,843 31.82
Past Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2008 52.44% 24,460 46.01% 21,459 1.55% 721
2004 55.52% 23,302 43.87% 18,412 0.61% 256
2000 52.23% 17,785 45.00% 15,325 2.77% 944
1996 45.37% 13,332 43.23% 12,705 11.40% 3,351

Missouri Presidential Preference Primary (2008)[edit]

Platte County, Missouri
2008 Republican primary in Missouri
John McCain 2,793 (33.49%)
Mike Huckabee 1,825 (21.88%)
Mitt Romney 3,109 (37.27%)
Ron Paul 472 (5.66%)
Platte County, Missouri
2008 Democratic primary in Missouri
Hillary Rodham Clinton 5,434 (50.07%)
Barack Obama 5,158 (47.53%)
John Edwards (withdrawn) 192 (1.77%)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 12, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Census 2010 Gazetteer Files". Retrieved July 2, 2013. 
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved September 12, 2013. 
  5. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°23′N 94°46′W / 39.38°N 94.77°W / 39.38; -94.77