Pleasantville, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pleasantville, New Jersey
City
City of Pleasantville
Map of Pleasantville in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Pleasantville in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pleasantville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pleasantville, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°23′20″N 74°30′51″W / 39.3888°N 74.514263°W / 39.3888; -74.514263Coordinates: 39°23′20″N 74°30′51″W / 39.3888°N 74.514263°W / 39.3888; -74.514263[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated January 10, 1889
Government[6]
 • Type City
 • Mayor Jesse L. Tweedle, Sr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Linda D. Peyton[4]
 • Clerk Gloria V. Griffin[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 7.298 sq mi (18.901 km2)
 • Land 5.694 sq mi (14.746 km2)
 • Water 1.604 sq mi (4.154 km2)  21.98%
Area rank 238th of 566 in state
16th of 23 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 20,249
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 20,750
 • Rank 128th of 566 in state
5th of 23 in county[12]
 • Density 3,556.5/sq mi (1,373.2/km2)
 • Density rank 182nd of 566 in state
4th of 23 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08232[13][14]
Area code 609[15]
FIPS code 3400159640[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885356[18][2]
Website pleasantville-nj.org

Pleasantville is a city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 20,249,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,237 (+6.5%) from the 19,012 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,985 (+18.6%) from the 16,027 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Pleasantville was originally incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 10, 1889, from portions of Egg Harbor Township, based on the results of a referendum held on December 15, 1888. Pleasantville was incorporated as a city on April 14, 1914, replacing Pleasantville borough, based on the results of a referendum held that same day.[20]

Geography[edit]

Pleasantville is located at 39°23′20″N 74°30′51″W / 39.3888°N 74.514263°W / 39.3888; -74.514263 (39.3888,-74.514263). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 7.298 square miles (18.901 km2), of which, 5.694 square miles (14.746 km2) of it was land and 1.604 square miles (4.154 km2) of it (21.98%) was water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 2,182
1910 4,390 101.2%
1920 5,887 34.1%
1930 11,580 96.7%
1940 11,050 −4.6%
1950 11,938 8.0%
1960 15,172 27.1%
1970 14,007 −7.7%
1980 13,435 −4.1%
1990 16,027 19.3%
2000 19,012 18.6%
2010 20,249 6.5%
Est. 2012 20,750 [11] 2.5%
Population sources: 1900-2000[21]
1900-1920[22] 1900-1910
[23]
1900-1930[24] 1930-1990[25]
2000[26][27] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 20,249 people, 6,661 households, and 4,569 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,556.5 per square mile (1,373.2 /km2). There were 7,219 housing units at an average density of 1,267.9 per square mile (489.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 24.33% (4,926) White, 45.94% (9,303) Black or African American, 0.83% (168) Native American, 2.42% (490) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 22.00% (4,454) from other races, and 4.45% (902) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 41.06% (8,314) of the population.[8]

There were 6,661 households, of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.3% were married couples living together, 26.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.53.[8]

In the city, 27.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 11.1% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 23.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.0 years. For every 100 females there were 92.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.2 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $39,560 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,092) and the median family income was $48,873 (+/- $5,405). Males had a median income of $32,494 (+/- $4,209) versus $29,961 (+/- $2,187) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,527 (+/- $1,356). About 12.2% of families and 18.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.7% of those under age 18 and 32.3% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 19,012 people, 6,402 households, and 4,366 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,291.3 people per square mile (1,270.0/km2). There were 7,042 housing units at an average density of 1,219.1 per square mile (470.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 25.01% White, 57.70% African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.95% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 10.96% from other races, and 4.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 21.87% of the population.[26][27]

There were 6,402 households out of which 36.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.0% were married couples living together, 24.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.8% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.44.[26][27]

In the city the age distribution of the population shows 30.4% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 88.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.8 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the city was $36,913, and the median income for a family was $40,016. Males had a median income of $26,909 versus $25,886 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,668. About 12.2% of families and 15.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.2% of those under age 18 and 13.5% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Pleasantville operates under the City form of New Jersey municipal government, led by a Mayor and a seven-member City Council, all of whom are elected in partisan elections as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected to a four-year term of office. The City Council consists of one member elected at large and six members elected from each of two wards to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two seats up for election each year.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of the City of Pleasantville is Democrat Jesse L. Tweedle, Sr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2016. Members of the City Council are William Christmas (D, 2015; At Large), Ricky Cistrunk (D, 2014; Ward 1), Lincoln Green, Sr. (D, 2015; Ward 1), Augustus C. Harmon (D, 2014; Ward 2 - serving the unexpired term of Johnson W. Harmon), Lockland V. Scott (D, 2015; Ward 2), Stanley C. Swan, Jr. (D, 2013; Ward 1) and Judy M. Ward (D, 2013; Ward 2).[29][30][31][32][33]

Augustus Harmon was appointed in November 2011 to fill the seat of his brother Johnson Harmon, who died before the election in which he won a fifth term of office.[34]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Pleasantville is located in the 2nd Congressional District[35] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[9][36][37]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[41][42]

The 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City) and in the General Assembly by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and John F. Amodeo (D, Northfield).[43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Atlantic County is governed by a County Executive directly chosen by voters, with the county's legislature, the Board of Chosen Freeholders, consisting of nine members elected to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with three seats coming up for election each year; four of its members are elected at-large and there are five election districts, each of which elect a single member.[46][47] The County Executive is Dennis Levinson (Linwood, term ends December 31, 2015.[48] As of 2013, Atlantic County's Freeholders are the four at-large members; Colin G. Bell (Northfield, 2015)[49], Alexander C. Marino (Linwood, 2014)[50], Vice Chairman Joseph J. McDevitt (Ventnor City, 2013)[51] and John W. Risley (Northfield, 2014)[52]; and five district members elected from District 1 (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville) Charles T. Garrett (Atlantic City, 2013)[53], District 2 - (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Longport, Margate City, Somers Point and Ventnor City), Chairman Frank D. Formica (Atlantic City, 2015)[54], District 3 (Egg Harbor Township (part), Hamilton Township (part), Linwood and Northfield) - Frank Sutton (Egg Harbor Township, 2014)[55], District 4 (Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic - Richard Dase (Galloway Township, 2013)[56] and District 5 (Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth Township) - James A. Bertino (Hammonton, 2015).[57][46]

Education[edit]

Students in Kindergarten through 12th grade are educated by the Pleasantville Public Schools. The district is one of 31 Abbott districts statewide,[58] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[59][60]

Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[61]) (115 students in PreK), four elementary schools — Leeds Avenue School[62] (529; PreK-5), North Main Street School[63] (279; PreK-5), South Main Street School[64] (464; K-5), Washington Avenue School[65] (397; K-5) — Pleasantville Middle School[66] with 611 students in grades 6 - 8, Pleasantville High School[67] with 796 students in grades 9 through 12 and Greyhound Academy.[68][69] Students from Absecon attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[70]

On September 6, 2007, The FBI arrested five members of the Pleasantville school board as part of a federal corruption case that included several state lawmakers and other public officials. Included in the sweep were the arrests of Assemblymen Mims Hackett and Alfred E. Steele, and Passaic Mayor Samuel Rivera.[71] Indictments were filed against four sitting members of the Board of Education charging that they had accepted bribes to steer insurance or roofing business from the district. Charged were Jayson Adams (accused of accepting $15,000 in bribes), James McCormick ($3,500), James Pressley ($32,200) and Rafael Velez ($4,000). Former board member Maurice 'Pete' Callaway, a member of the Pleasantville City Council, was accused of accepting $13,000 in bribes as part of the scheme.[72]

Students from Pleasantville, and all of Atlantic County, have the option to attend the career technical programs and full-time career academies offered by the Atlantic County Institute of Technology located in the Mays Landing section of Hamilton Township[73] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[74]

Commerce[edit]

Portions of Pleasantville are part of an Urban Enterprise Zone. In addition to other benefits to encourage employment within the Zone, shoppers can take advantage of a reduced 3½% sales tax rate at eligible merchants (versus the 7% rate charged statewide).[75]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The city had a total of 68.28 miles (109.89 km) of roadways, of which 53.12 miles (85.49 km) are maintained by the municipality, 7.70 miles (12.39 km) by Atlantic County and 4.26 miles (6.86 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.20 miles (5.15 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.[76]

U.S. Route 9, U.S. Route 40, U.S. Route 322 and the Atlantic City Expressway pass through Pleasantville.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers bus service to Atlantic City, New Jersey and other intermediate stations on routes 502 (from Atlantic Cape Community College), 507 (from Ocean City), 508 (from Hamilton Mall), 509 (from Ocean City), 553 (limited; from Upper Deerfield Township), 554 (from Lindenwold station) and 559 (from Lakewood Township).[77][78]

Sports[edit]

In 1945, the Boston Red Sox held their spring training in Pleasantville.[79]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Pleasantville include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ City Administrator, City of Pleasantville. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  5. ^ City Clerk, City of Pleasantville. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Pleasantville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pleasantville city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Pleasantville city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pleasantville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 16, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Pleasantville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 70. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  21. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 2000, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  23. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 712. Accessed January 16, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930–1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed January 16, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Pleasantville city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Pleasantville city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Pleasantville city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  29. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, City of Pleasantville. Accessed July 17, 2013.
  30. ^ Municipal Governments in Atlantic County, Atlantic County, New Jersey, last updated October 31, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  31. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 6, 2012, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  32. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 8, 2011, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  33. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 2, 2010, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  34. ^ Stetser, Laura. "Augustus Harmon takes over brother’s council seat", Shore News Today, November 8, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2013. "City Council appointed Augustus Harmon Monday, Nov. 7 to fill the unexpired term of his late brother Johnson Harmon, who died amid a re-election campaign for a fifth term and won the election by 96 percent of the vote."
  35. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  39. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  42. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 15, 2014.
  44. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ a b Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Atlantic County District Map 2013, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  48. ^ County Executive Dennis Levinson, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Colin G. Bell, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  50. ^ Alexander C. Marino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Joseph C. McDevitt, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  52. ^ John W. Risley, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  53. ^ Charles T. Garrett, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Frank D. Formica, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  55. ^ Frank Sutton, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  56. ^ Richard Dase, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  57. ^ James A. Bertino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  58. ^ Abbott Districts, New Jersey Department of Education, backed up by the Internet Archiveas of May 15, 2009. Accessed August 14, 2012.
  59. ^ What are SDA Districts?, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 14, 2012. "SDA Districts are 31 special-needs school districts throughout New Jersey. They were formerly known as Abbott Districts, based on the Abbott v. Burke case in which the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the State must provide 100 percent funding for all school renovation and construction projects in special-needs school districts.... The districts were renamed after the elimination of the Abbott designation through passage of the state’s new School Funding Formula in January 2008."
  60. ^ SDA Districts, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 14, 2012.
  61. ^ School Data for the Pleasantville Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  62. ^ Leeds Avenue School, Pleasantville Public Schools. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  63. ^ North Main Street School, Pleasantville Public Schools. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  64. ^ South Main Street School, Pleasantville Public Schools. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  65. ^ Washington Avenue School, Pleasantville Public Schools. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  66. ^ Pleasantville Middle School, Pleasantville Public Schools. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  67. ^ Pleasantville High School, Pleasantville Public Schools. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  68. ^ Greyhound Academy, Pleasantville Public Schools. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  69. ^ New Jersey School Directory, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  70. ^ Cohen, Lynda. "New issues draw new interest in Absecon school vote", The Press of Atlantic City, April 12, 2008. Accessed May 1, 2008. "Few Absecon students currently attend Pleasantville High School, where the district has a sending relationship."
  71. ^ Baldwin, Tom. "11 arrested in N.J. corruption probe", USA Today, September 6, 2007. Accessed September 6, 2007. "Among the arrested were state Assemblymen Mims Hackett Jr. and Rev. Alfred Steele aides in their legislative offices acknowledged. Also reportedly arrested was Samuel Rivera, the mayor of Passaic, and Keith Reid, the chief of staff to Newark City Council President Mildred Crump."
  72. ^ Staff. "Who's who: Overview of the politicians charged in bribery scandal", The Record (Bergen County), September 7, 2007. Accessed September 7, 2007.
  73. ^ About Us, Atlantic County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  74. ^ Profile, Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  75. ^ Geographic & Urban Redevelopment Tax Credit Programs: Urban Enterprise Zone Employee Tax Credit, State of New Jersey, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 3, 2010. Accessed January 16, 2012.
  76. ^ Atlantic County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  77. ^ Atlantic County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of June 26, 2010. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  78. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  79. ^ The ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia. Sterling Publishing. 2007. p. 1789. ISBN 1-4027-4771-3. 
  80. ^ Omowale, J. Nadir. "Uniquely Blue Raspberry; This New Jersey native moved to Detroit to launch her solo career", BLAC Detroit, September 23, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2013. "Born to a musical family in Pleasantville, N.J., near Atlantic City, she came of age listening to the sounds of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, James Brown and Terrell."
  81. ^ Sims, Gayle Ronan. "Horse-diver Sonora Webster Carver, 99", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 24, 2003. Accessed December 3, 2007. "Sonora Webster Carver, 99, the first woman to dive off Atlantic City's Steel Pier while riding a horse - a stunt she continued for 11 years after she was blinded during a performance - died Sunday at Our Lady's Residence in Pleasantville, N.J."
  82. ^ New Jersey Governor Walter Evans Edge, National Governors Association. Accessed August 2, 2007.
  83. ^ Panaccio, Tim. "Gene Hart, Longtime Voice Of Flyers, Dies", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 15, 1999. Accessed November 19, 2013. "Mr. Hart went to Pleasantville High School in South Jersey, where he was all-state in baseball and also lettered in football."
  84. ^ Ty Helfrich, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed May 6, 2008.
  85. ^ Norment, Lynn. "Rodney Jerkins: music maestro on a mission.", Ebony (magazine), June 1, 2002. Accessed December 19, 2007. "Jerkins is pop music's newest and youngest hit-making wiz. At age 24, the Pleasantville, N.J., native is a fascinating coming-of-age success story and stands out among hundreds of rags-to-riches tales."
  86. ^ Famous People in Atlantic County History, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 31, 2008.
  87. ^ Schwachter, Jeff. "A Musical Homecoming for Ralph PetersonFrom Pleasantville to Blakey to Berklee and beyond, Ralph Peterson’s life in jazz comes full circle with new album and Father’s Day concert in Atlantic City.", Atlantic City Weekly, June 13, 2012. Accessed November 19, 2013. "Peterson grew up in Pleasantville and graduated from Pleasantville High School. He then went to Rutgers University in New Brunswick, graduating in 1984, and 'studying with a lot of big [music] people there,' including Kenny Barron and Michael Carvin."
  88. ^ Post, Michelle Brunetti. "Comic book fan and Pleasantville High School graduate helps make action figures at Hasbro", The Press of Atlantic City, January 29, 2011. Accessed August 30, 2011. "David Vonner, 38, grew up in Atlantic City's Pitney Village and graduated in 1990 from Pleasantville High School, where he was a talented artist, comic book fan and a bit of a class clown."

External links[edit]