Plushophilia

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Plushophilia (from "plushie" and "-philia") is a paraphilia involving stuffed animals. Plushophiles are sometimes called plushies, although this term (plushies) can also refer to non-sexual stuffed animal enthusiasts, and to stuffed animals in general.[1][2]

Plushophilia is sometimes assumed to be a practice common within furry fandom, due in part to a 2001 article by Vanity Fair that linked various members of the furry community with plushophilia.[3][4][5][6][7] A 1998 survey of 360 members of the furry community suggested less than one percent (that is, fewer than four people) attested to being plushophiles.[8]

Pornography and sexual activity involving animal anthropomorphism (including plushophilia and paraphilias involving fursuits and cartoon animals) is known in the furry fandom community as "yiff" (and sexual acts as "yiffing").[6][9]

Anne Lawrence has proposed that sexual arousal that depends upon imagining one's self as plush or "representations of anthropomorphic animal characters in animated cartoons" be termed autoplushophilia.[10] Paraphilic interests that involve being in another form have been referred to as erotic target location errors.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Hill, Dave (2000-06-19), Cuddle Time, Salon.com 
  2. ^ Kelleher, Kathleen (2001-06-04). "Once Seen as Taboos, Sexual Fetishes Are Gaining Acceptance". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-05-22. 
  3. ^ Craig Malisow (2003-12-18). "Wild Kingdom". Houston Press. Retrieved 2013-04-01. 
  4. ^ http://www.montrealmirror.com/ARCHIVES/2001/041201/cover.html
  5. ^ Kates, Tasha. "Animal Magnetism". Citypaper.net. Retrieved 2013-04-01. 
  6. ^ a b Meinzer, Melissa (2006-06-29), Animal Passions, Pittsburgh City Paper 
  7. ^ Gurley, George (March 2001), Pleasures of the Fur, Vanity Fair 
  8. ^ "The Darken Hollow - Thoughts - Furry Sociology". Visi.com. 2002-08-01. Retrieved 2013-04-01. 
  9. ^ "Who are the furries?". BBC News. 2009-11-13. Retrieved 2010-05-22. 
  10. ^ Lawrence, A. A. (2009). Erotic target location errors: An under appreciated paraphilic dimension. The Journal of Sex Research, 46, 194-215.

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