Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse

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Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse
PlymouthMeetinghouseMontgomeryCountyPennsylvania.jpg
Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse, HABS Photograph
Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse is located in Pennsylvania
Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse
Location Corner of Germantown and Butler Pikes, Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°6′8″N 75°16′48″W / 40.10222°N 75.28000°W / 40.10222; -75.28000Coordinates: 40°6′8″N 75°16′48″W / 40.10222°N 75.28000°W / 40.10222; -75.28000
Area 5 acres (2.0 ha)
Built 1708
Architectural style Colonial
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 71000714[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP February 18, 1971
Designated PHMC May 15, 1955[2]

Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse is a historic Quaker meeting house at the corner of Germantown and Butler Pikes in Plymouth Meeting, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1708, and is constructed of native limestone. A wing was added in 1780, and the interior was rebuilt in 1867 after a fire. The porch was also added in 1867, and a rear wing added in 1945. During the American Revolutionary War, the building was used as a hospital for George Washington's troops and known as the "Camp at Plymouth Meeting House." The meeting house was a hub of activity on the Underground Railroad and Lucretia Mott is known to have attended a meeting here. Noted artist Thomas Hovenden (1840-1895) is buried in the adjacent cemetery.[3] Plymouth Meeting Friend School is under the care of the meeting and is located on site.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.[1] It is located in the Plymouth Meeting Historic District.

William Jeanes Memorial Library (1935), built on the grounds of the meetinghouse.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  2. ^ "PHMC Historical Markers". Historical Marker Database. Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission. Retrieved December 30, 2013. 
  3. ^ "National Historic Landmarks & National Register of Historic Places in Pennsylvania" (Searchable database). CRGIS: Cultural Resources Geographic Information System.  Note: This includes Helen Reichart Mirras (December 1969). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-05-24.