Poço das Antas Biological Reserve

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Poço das Antas Biological Reserve
Reserva Biológica de Poço das Antas
REBIO Poço das antas.jpg
Aerial view of Poço das Antas Biological Reserve
Map showing the location of Poço das Antas Biological Reserve
Map showing the location of Poço das Antas Biological Reserve
Map of Brazil
Location Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil
Coordinates 22°33′11″S 42°16′55″W / 22.553°S 42.282°W / -22.553; -42.282Coordinates: 22°33′11″S 42°16′55″W / 22.553°S 42.282°W / -22.553; -42.282[1]
Area 50 km2 (19 sq mi)
Established 1974

Poço das Antas Biological Reserve is a biological reserve located in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. The reserve has parts in the municipalities of Silva Jardim and Casimiro de Abreu, about 120 km (75 miles) from the state's capital of Rio de Janeiro.

Fauna[edit]

Golden Lion Tamarin[edit]

The Poço das Antas Biological Reserve is famous for its golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia), which represent most part of the few remaining wild golden lion tamarins in the world. There is estimated to be 1000 tamarins in the reserve and surrounding areas. Currently the Golden Lion Tamarin Conservation Project (GLTCP) is attempting to save the golden lion tamarins from extinction.[2]

Mammals[edit]

The Poço das Antas Biological Reserve is home to 77 known species of mammals. Currently the mammal population is threatened due to many reasons such as wildfires and poaching.[3]

Conservation[edit]

Due to rampant deforestation and cattle grazing, the Poço das Antas Biological Reserve is slowly shrinking in size, though many efforts are underway to try and save it.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Poço das Antas Biological Reserve". protectedplanet.net. 
  2. ^ "Golden Lion Tamarin Conservation Project". Brazil Ecotravel. 
  3. ^ Brito, Daniel; Oliveira, Leonardo C.; Mello, Marco Aurélio R. (2004). "An overview of mammalian conservation at Poço das Antas Biological Reserve, southeastern Brazil". Journal for Nature Conservation 12 (4): 219–228.