Pocahontas, Iowa

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Pocahontas, Iowa
City
Motto: "The princess city"
Location of Pocahontas, Iowa
Location of Pocahontas, Iowa
Coordinates: 42°44′4″N 94°40′23″W / 42.73444°N 94.67306°W / 42.73444; -94.67306Coordinates: 42°44′4″N 94°40′23″W / 42.73444°N 94.67306°W / 42.73444; -94.67306
Country  United States
State  Iowa
County Pocahontas
Incorporated May 16, 1892 [1]
Government
 • Mayor Dick Gruber
Area[2]
 • Total 2.02 sq mi (5.23 km2)
 • Land 2.02 sq mi (5.23 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,220 ft (372 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 1,789
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 1,744
 • Density 885.6/sq mi (341.9/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 50574
Area code(s) 712
FIPS code 19-63975
GNIS feature ID 0460342
Website http://www.pocahontasiowa.com

Pocahontas is a city in and the county seat of Pocahontas County, Iowa, United States.[5] The population was 1,789 in the 2010 census, a decline from the 1,970 population in the 2000 census.[6][7]

History[edit]

This city was named after the Native American princess from Jamestown, Virginia. Other geographical names in the county related to the colony at Jamestown are Rolfe, Powhatan Township and Varina.[8]

Pocahontas was incorporated as a city on May 16, 1892.[1]

April 9, 2011 Tornado[edit]

During the April 2011 Iowa-Wisconsin tornado outbreak, an extremely large rated EF4 tornado tore through Pocahontas and the surrounding area. No one was injured and there were no fatalities. It was reported that the tornado was possibly up to three miles wide.[citation needed]

Geography[edit]

Pocahontas's longitude and latitude coordinates
in decimal form are 42.734476, -94.673017.[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.02 square miles (5.23 km2), all of it land.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Pocahontas
population history
Census Pop.
1900 625
1910 987 57.9%
1920 1,302 31.9%
1930 1,308 0.5%
1940 1,730 32.3%
1950 1,949 12.7%
1960 2,011 3.2%
1970 2,338 16.3%
1980 2,352 0.6%
1990 2,085 −11.4%
2000 1,970 −5.5%
2010 1,789 −9.2%
Iowa Data Center [7]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 1,789 people, 852 households, and 493 families residing in the city. The population density was 885.6 inhabitants per square mile (341.9 /km2). There were 953 housing units at an average density of 471.8 per square mile (182.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.3% White, 0.3% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.1% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population.

There were 852 households of which 21.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.0% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.1% were non-families. 39.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 22.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.04 and the average family size was 2.70.

The median age in the city was 51.1 years. 19.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 16.6% were from 25 to 44; 29.5% were from 45 to 64; and 29.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.6% male and 53.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 1,970 people, 883 households, and 549 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,059.8 people per square mile (408.9/km²). There were 946 housing units at an average density of 508.9 per square mile (196.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.68% White, 0.25% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.51% of the population.

There were 883 households out of which 25.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.8% were non-families. 36.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 24.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.79.

Age spread: 23.1% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 22.1% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 24.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 84.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,865, and the median income for a family was $42,690. Males had a median income of $29,806 versus $19,886 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,556. About 6.7% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.9% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Air transportation for Pocahontas is provided by Pocahontas Municipal Airport (FAA Identifier POH), located approximately 1 mile northeast of the city. The airport has 2 runways, the first is designated 11/29, with a concrete surface 4100 x 60 ft (1250 x 18 m) and runway edge lights, the second is designated 18/36 with a turf surface 1998 x 135 ft (609 x 41 m) and is unlighted.[11]

Notable people[edit]

Romaine H. "Ro" Foege (born September 1, 1938) was the Iowa State Representative from the 29th District. He was in the Iowa House of Representatives 1996–2008. He received his BA from Wartburg College and his MSW from the University of Iowa.


Aaron Wernimont, (Oct 20, 1985-March 13, 2012) Graduated from Pocahontas Area High School, quarterback and state champion wrestler; three-time Collegiate All-American wrestler and an Academic All-American from Wartburg College, Waverly, Iowa, winning his last 80 matches and NCAA Division III national titles in 2008 and 2009

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "LIST OF INCORPORATED CITIES". Iowa Secretary of State - Matt Schultz. Retrieved 2011-08-09. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-23. 
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  6. ^ "Population & Housing Occupancy Status 2010". United States Census Bureau American FactFinder. Retrieved 2011-08-08. 
  7. ^ a b "Data from the 2010 Census". State Data Center of Iowa. Retrieved 2011-08-08. 
  8. ^ "Pocahontas County Economic Development – History page". Northwest Web Solutions. Retrieved 2011-01-13. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ "Individual Airport Report - Pocahontas Municipal Airport". Iowa Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2011-08-09. 
  12. ^ "BASEBALL Reference". Larry Biittner. Retrieved 2010-12-16. 
  13. ^ Martin, Douglas (October 5, 2009). "Peg Mullen, 92, Who Fanned Her Anger Over Son’s Death Into Antiwar Drive, Dies". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-01-13. 
  14. ^ "Georgetown University". CURRICULUM VITAE -- James V. Schall. Retrieved 2011-01-12. 

External links[edit]