Pohang-class corvette

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PCC-783.jpg
Pohang-class corvette
Class overview
Name: Pohang-class corvette
Builders:  Republic of Korea
Operators: Naval Jack of South Korea.svg Republic of Korea Navy
Preceded by: Donghae-class corvette
Succeeded by: Incheon-class frigate
In commission: 18 December 1984 - present
Completed: 24
Active: 21
Lost: 1
Retired: 2
Preserved: 1
General characteristics
Displacement: 1,200 tonnes (1,200 long tons; 1,300 short tons)
Length: 88.3 m (289 ft 8 in)[1]
Beam: 10 m (32 ft 10 in)[2]
Draft: 2.9 m (9 ft 6 in)[1]
Propulsion: CODOG unit[2]
Speed: Maximum: 32 knots (59 km/h)
Cruising: 15 knots (28 km/h)[2]
Range: 4,000 nautical miles (7,400 km)[2]
Crew: 95
Sensors and
processing systems:

ASUW Version:
[3] - AN/SPS-64 Surface Search Radar
- Signaal WM 28 Fire Control System
- Signaal LIOD (Lightweight Optronic Director)

ASW Version:
- Marconi ST-1810 Surface Search Radar
- ST-1802 Fire Control System
- Radamec 2400 Optronic System

- Signaal PHS-32 Hull Mounted Sonar
Electronic warfare
& decoys:

ASUW Version:

- 4 x Mel Protean Chaff Launchers
Armament:

ASUW Version:
[3] - 2 x MM-38 Exocet
- 1 x OTO Melara 76 mm/62 compact cannon
- 2 x Emerlec 30 mm cannons

ASW Version:
- 2 x OTO Melara 76 mm/62 compact cannon
- 4 x Harpoon missiles
- 2 x Breda 40mm/70 twin cannons
- 2 x Mark 32 triple torpedo tubes (with 6× Mark 46 torpedoes)

- 12 x Mark 9 depth charges

The Pohang class corvette (Korean: 포항급 초계함, Hanja: 浦項級哨戒艦) is a class of general purpose vessels operated by the Republic of Korea Navy. They have served in a coastal defense role during the late Cold War and post Cold War period. A total of 24 Pohang-class vessels were built, all constructed in South Korea. 21 vessels remain in service.

Ships in the class[edit]

 Name   Number   Builder   Launched   Commissioned   Decommissioned   Status 
Flight II
Pohang PCC-756 Korea Shipbuilding Corporation
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
30 June 1984 18 December 1984 30 June 2009 Used as a museum ship in Pohang city
Gunsan PCC-757 Korea Takoma Shipyard
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
30 November 1984 29 September 2011 Offered to the Colombian Navy, rejected in favor of a Donghae-class corvette
Gyeongju PCC-758 Hyundai Heavy Industries 1986 Scheduled for deactivation and for transfer to the Philippine Navy
Mokpo PCC-759 Daewoo S&M Engineering 1986 Active
Flight III
Gimcheon PCC-761 Korea Shipbuilding Corporation
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
1987 Active
Chungju PCC-762 Korea Takoma Shipyard
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
1987 Active
Jinju PCC-763 Hyundai Heavy Industries 1988 Active
Yeosu PCC-765 Daewoo S&M Engineering 14 June 1986 30 November 1986 Active
Flight IV
Jinhae PCC-766 Korea Shipbuilding Corporation
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
18 March 1987 1990 Active
Suncheon PCC-767 Korea Takoma Shipyard
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
1989 Active
Iksan PCC-768 Hyundai Heavy Industries 1989 Active
Name was changed from Iri since 1 February 1999
Wonju PCC-769 Daewoo S&M Engineering 1989 Active
Andong PCC-771 Korea Shipbuilding Corporation
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
30 April 1987 7 November 1988 Active
Cheonan PCC-772 Korea Shipbuilding Corporation
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
1989 1989 26 March 2010 Sunk, allegedly by torpedo attack from DPRK
Bucheon PCC-773 Hyundai Heavy Industries 1990 Active
Seongnam PCC-775 Daewoo S&M Engineering 1990 Active
Jecheon PCC-776 Korea Takoma Shipyard
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
1990 Active
Daecheon PCC-777 Hyundai Heavy Industries 1991 Active
Flight V
Sokcho PCC-778 Hyundai Heavy Industries 1991 Active
Yeongju PCC-779 Hyundai Heavy Industries 1991 Active
Namwon PCC-781 Daewoo S&M Engineering 1991 Active
Gwangmyeong PCC-782 Korea Takoma Shipyard
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
1991 Active
Sinseong PCC-783 Korea Shipbuilding Corporation
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
1992 Active
Gongju PCC-785 Korea Takoma Shipyard
(now Hanjin Heavy Industries)
21 September 1992 31 July 1993 Active


Sinking of ROKS Cheonan[edit]

Main article: ROKS Cheonan sinking

At 21:21:57 (12:21:57 UTC) of 26 March 2010, an explosion (or two explosions) occurred for 1~2 seconds at the stern of ROKS Cheonan, causing a power stoppage and inflow of oil and seawater, and the ship heeled 90 degrees to starboard very quickly. When the crew went out to the deck, they found the stern already submerged. At 22:40, the Navy and the Coast Guard rescued 58 sailors, including the captain, from the crew of 104; 46 were killed.[4] The ship sank around 01:00 on 27 March 2010.

The bow floated 6.4 kilometres (3.5 nmi) to the southeast from the explosion site, then submerged completely at 22:30 on 27 March 2010.

On May 20, 2010, a South Korean-led investigation group announced that all evidence pointed to a North Korean torpedo being responsible for the sinking of the Cheonan.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b John E. Pike (January 9, 2010). "Pohang (PCC Patrol Combat Corvette): Specifications". GlobalSecurity.org. Alexandria, Virginia. Retrieved May 25, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Patrol Combat Covtte (PCC)". Republic of Korea Navy. Retrieved March 26, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Pohang Class Patrol Combat Corvettes"
  4. ^ "軍 "사고시각 26일 21시22분" 재확인". 2010-04-07.