Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey

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Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Point Pleasant Beach
Jenkinson's Boardwalk
Jenkinson's Boardwalk
Map of Point Pleasant Beach in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Point Pleasant Beach in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°05′33″N 74°02′43″W / 40.092566°N 74.045173°W / 40.092566; -74.045173Coordinates: 40°05′33″N 74°02′43″W / 40.092566°N 74.045173°W / 40.092566; -74.045173[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Ocean
Incorporated May 18, 1886
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Vincent Barrella (I, term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Administrator Christine Riehl[5]
 • Clerk Maryann Ellsworth[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.744 sq mi (4.516 km2)
 • Land 1.427 sq mi (3.695 km2)
 • Water 0.317 sq mi (0.821 km2)  18.18%
Area rank 427th of 566 in state
19th of 33 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11][12]
 • Total 4,665
 • Estimate (2013)[13] 4,642
 • Rank 388th of 566 in state
15th of 33 in county[14]
 • Density 3,270.1/sq mi (1,262.6/km2)
 • Density rank 202nd of 566 in state
7th of 33 in county[14]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08742[15][16]
Area code(s) 732[17]
FIPS code 3402959910[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID 885358[1][20]
Website www.pointpleasantbeach.org

Point Pleasant Beach is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,665,[10][11][12] reflecting a decline of 649 (-12.2%) from the 5,314 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 202 (+4.0%) from the 5,112 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Point Pleasant Beach was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on May 18, 1886, from portions of Brick Township, subject to the results of a referendum passed the previous day.[22]

The borough is a Jersey Shore community situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that divides the Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. The Point Pleasant Beach boardwalk is approximately one mile long, spanning the coastline from the Manasquan Inlet at the north to New Jersey Avenue in the south. The central third of the boardwalk is largely amusement rides, the Jenkinsons Arcades, pizza joints, ice cream parlors, games-of-chance and miniature golf courses. Point Pleasant Beach is also the northern terminus of the East Coast's Intracoastal Waterway. It is near Point Pleasant borough, a municipality independent of Point Pleasant Beach.

It was ranked the eighth-best beach in New Jersey in the 2008 Top 10 Beaches Contest sponsored by the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium.[23]

Geography[edit]

Point Pleasant Beach is located at 40°05′33″N 74°02′43″W / 40.092566°N 74.045173°W / 40.092566; -74.045173 (40.092566,-74.045173). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.744 square miles (4.516 km2), of which, 1.427 square miles (3.695 km2) of it was land and 0.317 square miles (0.821 km2) of it (18.18%) was water.[1][2]

History[edit]

The area that includes Point Pleasant Beach was first used by the Lenape Native Americans. On September 2, 1609, Henry Hudson and the crew of his ship, Half Moon, noticed the area on their way north to explore the Hudson River. Crew member Robert Juet noted in his journal, "This is a very good Land to fall with and a pleasant Land to see." The first European settlers were fisherman and farmers who first arrived in the 18th century. Summer tourism began in the early 19th century when Quaker Thomas Cook, Jr. opened his farmhouse on the site of the current Antrim Elementary School to boarders, which began the trend that transformed the area into an oceanfront haven for visitors, a trend further established in the 1870 by Captain John Arnold, who built a roadway to the ocean, now known as Arnold Avenue. In 1875, he built the first bridge over the Manasquan River, linking the town to Brielle. He later convinced the Central Jersey Railroad to extend its service to Point Pleasant Beach, which it did beginning on July 3, 1880.[24]

The Borough of Point Pleasant Beach was established on June 2, 1886.[22][24]

County of Edinburgh stranded on the beach, February 12–14, 1900.

The 1870s was an era of major tourism expansion, driven by developers who subdivided old farms for vacation home lots. Captain Arnold devised Arnold City between Central and what was to become Arnold Avenue. In 1877, the Point Pleasant Land Company bought the old Forman Farm, 250 acres (1.0 km2) on what is now Route 35 South, between Forman and Elizabeth Avenues and began selling lots. In 1878, it built the four-story, 200-guest Resort House, the largest building in town. It also began a horse-drawn trolley service to attract tourists. Other hotels were built before the turn-of-the-20th century, including the largest, the Leighton, as well as the Beacon, and Zimmerman's, though many of these, including the Resort House, burnt down, succumbed to changing tastes, or were dismantled for wood during World War II. Initially, visitors focused their attention on the Manasquan River, cedar groves and farmhouses, but their interest in the ocean led to development on the waterfront, beginning with the first beachfront pavilion on Atlantic Avenue in 1880. Ten years later, the first flimsy, portable boardwalk was built, but it washed away within two years.[24]

The original amusement area was Clark's Landing, which opened on the Manasquan River in 1892. In 1897, the decision for privately owned beaches in Point Pleasant Beach was made when, as noted in the Council minutes of August 16, "Ownership of the Beach turned down by the Council because of the extreme cost to the Borough for maintenance." In 1915, the first permanent boardwalk was built between Philadelphia and Central Avenues, and eventually expanded along the entire length of Point Pleasant Beach, but shortened to its present length by a September 1938 hurricane that destroyed its southern portion. It evolved from a mere promenade for strolling to a more active amusement area, beginning with Charles Jenkinson's construction in the 1920s of Jenkinson’s Pavilion and Swimming Pool. The boardwalk pavilion became the center of nightlife, featuring sophisticated dancing, well-known big bands, and occasional live nationally broadcast radio. Today it features a number of amusement rides, video arcades, and diverse cuisine, ranging from the traditional sausage sandwich to sushi.[24] Point Pleasant Beach hosts an annual Seafood Festival in September.[24]

On February 12, 1900, the steel-hulled, Scottish barque, County of Edinburgh was blown ashore at high tide and became stranded. The event became national news when it was extensively reported in The New York Times, illustrated by a high quality photograph that became the resource for a famous painting by Antonio Jacobsen.[25] The undamaged vessel was successfully re-floated on the spring tide of February 14 and continued on her voyage from Cape Town to New York.

In October 2012, Point Pleasant Beach and numerous other Jersey Shore communities, such as Seaside Heights and Long Beach Island, were devastated by Hurricane Sandy. Nearly 2,800 feet (850 m) of the borough's boardwalk was destroyed, with the cost of repairs estimated as up to $2 million.[26]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 746
1910 1,003 34.5%
1920 1,575 57.0%
1930 1,844 17.1%
1940 2,059 11.7%
1950 2,900 40.8%
1960 3,873 33.6%
1970 4,882 26.1%
1980 5,415 10.9%
1990 5,112 −5.6%
2000 5,314 4.0%
2010 4,665 −12.2%
Est. 2013 4,642 [13][27] −0.5%
Population sources:
1900-2000[28] 1900-1920[29]
1900-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32] 2000[33][34] 2010[9][10][11][12]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,665 people, 1,985 households, and 1,122 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,270.1 per square mile (1,262.6 /km2). There were 3,373 housing units at an average density of 2,364.4 per square mile (912.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.35% (4,308) White, 0.84% (39) Black or African American, 0.15% (7) Native American, 0.84% (39) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 4.52% (211) from other races, and 1.29% (60) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.02% (421) of the population.[10]

There were 1,985 households, of which 22.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.5% were non-families. 36.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.04.[10]

In the borough, 18.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 22.7% from 25 to 44, 33.6% from 45 to 64, and 17.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.7 years. For every 100 females there were 103.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.6 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $57,792 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,541) and the median family income was $65,402 (+/- $16,995). Males had a median income of $54,327 (+/- $12,359) versus $39,076 (+/- $6,800) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $39,250 (+/- $5,121). About 5.8% of families and 8.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.0% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 5,314 people, 2,317 households, and 1,316 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,696.0 people per square mile (1,424.8/km2). There were 3,558 housing units at an average density of 2,474.7 per square mile (954.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.94% White, 0.53% African American, 0.34% Native American, 1.02% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.47% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.40% of the population.[33][34]

There were 2,317 households out of which 22.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.2% were non-families. 36.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.96.[33][34]

In the borough the population was spread out with 19.2% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 26.6% from 45 to 64, and 19.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 101.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.9 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,105, and the median income for a family was $61,250. Males had a median income of $40,507 versus $37,500 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,853. About 5.0% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Point Pleasant Beach is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Point Pleasant Beach, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[36]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Point Pleasant Beach is Vincent Barrella (I, term ends December 31, 2015). Members of the Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee chairmanships listed in parentheses) are Council President William R. Mayer (R, 2014; Finance, Insurance and Advertising), George "Andy" Cortes (R, 2015; Public Property, Buildings and Grounds), Bret Gordon (I, 2014; Fire and Street Lighting), Stephen Reid (R, 2015; Streets and Water-Sewer Utility / Legislation, Litigation and Legal), Thomas Toohey (R, 2016; Inspections, Licenses and Building Codes) and Thomas Vogel (R, 2016; Police and Emergency Management / Personnel and Human Resources).[4][37][38]

In the November 2011 general election incumbent Vincent Barrella won re-election running as an independent after losing the endorsement of the Point Pleasant Beach Republican Party which went to Stephen Reid, while Republican William R. Mayer and Independent Bret Gordon won three-year terms on the Borough Council.[39] In December 2011, the council selected Stephen Reid to fill the vacant seat of Jeff Dyer who had resigned in November.[40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Point Pleasant Beach is located in the 4th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 10th state legislative district.[11][42][43]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[45][46] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[47][48]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 10th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River Township) and in the General Assembly by Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River Township) and David W. Wolfe (R, Brick Township).[49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[52] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; R, Toms River, term ends December 31, 2014),[53] Freeholder Deputy Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[54] John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, 2016),[55] James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2016)[56] and Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[60][61] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[62][63][64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,385 registered voters in Point Pleasant Beach, of which 623 (18.4%) were registered as Democrats, 1,295 (38.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,465 (43.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[65] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 72.6% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 89.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[65][66]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 58.1% of the vote here (1,486 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 40.1% (1,026 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (34 votes), among the 2,557 ballots cast by the borough's 3,533 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.4%.[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 59.2% of the vote here (1,561 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 39.2% (1,035 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (32 votes), among the 2,639 ballots cast by the borough's 3,647 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.4.[68]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 65.1% of the vote here (1,280 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 27.8% (546 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.3% (105 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (10 votes), among the 1,966 ballots cast by the borough's 3,425 registered voters, yielding a 57.4% turnout.[69]

Education[edit]

The Point Pleasant Beach School District serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are G. Harold Antrim Elementary School[71] for grades PreK-8 (485 students) and Point Pleasant Beach High School[72] for grades 9-12 (509 students).[73]

In addition to the students of Point Pleasant Beach the district serves the students of Bay Head and Lavallette for grades 9-12 and those from Mantoloking for K-12, as part of sending/receiving relationships. Some outside tuition students attend both schools.[74]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 29.66 miles (47.73 km) of roadways, of which 18.50 miles (29.77 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.86 miles (12.65 km) by Ocean County and 3.30 miles (5.31 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[75]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit trains stop at the Point Pleasant Beach station on Arnold Avenue[76] with service on the North Jersey Coast Line north to Penn Station Newark, Hoboken Terminal, and Penn Station New York in Midtown Manhattan.[77]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between the borough and Philadelphia on the 317 route along with local service on the 830 route.[78]

Pop culture references[edit]

Composer Edward Manukyan, who lived in Point Pleasant Beach briefly in 2002, wrote the song "Point Pleasant Beach" about the city.[79]

Notable residents[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Point Pleasant Beach include:

References[edit]

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  4. ^ a b 2014 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. pp. 9-10. Accessed February 12, 2104.
  5. ^ Borough Staff, Borough of Point Pleasant Beach. Accessed April 29, 2011.
  6. ^ Office of the Municipal Clerk, Borough of Point Pleasant Beach. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 53.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Point Pleasant Beach, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ a b "DataUniverse - 2010 Census Populations: Ocean County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Point Pleasant Beach borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Point Pleasant Beach borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 31, 2012.
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  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Point Pleasant Beach, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
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  25. ^ County of Edinburgh Ashore at Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey, circa 1902, Mariners' Museum. Accessed February 12, 2014. "Although most of Antonio Jacobsen's paintings were commissioned ship portraits, he occasionally depicted actual events. County of Edinburgh ran aground on February 12, 1900."
  26. ^ "Point Pleasant Beach boardwalk repair could cost $2M.". NJ.com, November 30, 2012. Accessed September 17, 2013. "As borough officials work to restore the area boardwalk in time for summer, they are faced with the daunting price tag of as much as $2 million, APP.com reports. According to the report, roughly half of the boardwalk — about 2,800 feet — was damaged by Hurricane Sandy and borough engineer Raymond Savacool said he will have to examine the entire boardwalk before placing bids for its restoration."
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  40. ^ DiStephan, Denise. Reid Appointed to Point Beach Council; Rizzo was one of three voting for Stephen Reid", PointPleasantPatch, December 7, 2011. Accessed December 7, 2011. "Stephen Reid, who narrowly lost Republican mayoral bids in the last two years, was picked 3 to 2 by Point Beach Borough Council to replace Jeff Dyer at the council meeting at Borough Hall on Tuesday night.Reid will serve the last year of Dyer's three-year term."
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  55. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
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  70. ^ Point Pleasant Beach School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  71. ^ G. Harold Antrim Elementary School, Point Pleasant Beach School District. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  72. ^ Point Pleasant Beach High School, Point Pleasant Beach School District. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  73. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Point Pleasant Beach School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  74. ^ Point Pleasant Beach School District 2013 School Report Card, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed February 12, 2014. "The Point Pleasant Beach School District is one of the oldest and finest at the Shore.... In addition to serving the students of Point Pleasant Beach and Mantoloking the district serves the high school age students of Bay Head and Lavallette."
  75. ^ Ocean County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  76. ^ Point Pleasant Beach station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 23, 2014.
  77. ^ North Jersey Coast Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 23, 2014.
  78. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  79. ^ LIST OF SONGS BY EDWARD MANUKYAN, accessed April 29, 2007.
  80. ^ McKeon, Therese. "Flying High", BelowEmpty.com, August 21, 2000. Accessed September 4, 2008. "Robert DeLeo: 98! Actually we were born in Montclair but we grew up down in Point Pleasant Beach – down at the shore (Robert pronounces it "shaw" in his best New Jersey accent)."
  81. ^ Nomination of Lieutenant General Alfred M. Gray, Jr., To Be Commandant of the Marine Corps, Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, dated June 16, 1987. Accessed December 13, 2007. "Lt. Gen. Gray was born on June 22, 1928, in Point Pleasant Beach, NJ."
  82. ^ Assemblyman James W. Holzapfel, New Jersey Senate Republicans. Accessed August 2, 2011. "Assemblyman James W. Holzapfel was born and raised in Point Pleasant Beach, where he graduated from high school in 1962."
  83. ^ Adelizzi, Joe. "Outbreak of ill will continues to fester", Asbury Park Press, June 13, 1999. Accessed December 31, 2012. "'Meridian has not responded to the community,' continued Holzapfel, who grew up in Point Pleasant Beach."
  84. ^ Spoto, MaryAnn. "Leonard Lomell, World War II hero from Toms River, dies at 91", The Star-Ledger, March 2, 2011. Accessed August 2, 2011. "Born in Brooklyn, he moved with his parents to Point Pleasant Borough on the Jersey Shore, where he graduated from Point Pleasant Beach High School."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Manasquan
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Bay Head