Political journalism

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Political journalism is a broad branch of journalism that includes coverage of all aspects of politics and political science, although the term usually refers specifically to coverage of civil governments and political power.

Political journalism is a frequent subject of opinion journalism, as current political events are analyzed, interpreted, and discussed by news media pundits and editorialists.

Subsets[edit]

  • Election journalism or electoral journalism is a subgenre of political journalism which focuses upon and analyzes developments related to an approximate election and political campaigns.[1] This subgenre makes use of statistics, polls and historic data in regards to a candidate's chance of success for office, or a party's change in size in a legislature.
  • Defense journalism or military journalism is a subgenre which focuses upon the current status of a nation's military, intelligence and other defense-related faculties. Interest in defense journalism tends to increase during times of violent conflict, with military leaders being the primary actors.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jorge Bravo (Year 3 No. 8 May 2010). "Towards an electoral journalism". Mundo Electoral/Electoral World.