Political party strength in Illinois

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The following table indicates the party of elected officials in the U.S. state of Illinois:

The table also indicates the historical party composition in the:

Political party strength in Illinois is highly dependent upon the county. Cook County, the most populous county in Illinois and encompasses most of Chicago, is a Democratic stronghold. However, Illinois' reputation as a blue state rests upon the fact that the majority of its population and political power is concentrated in Chicago. Outside of Chicago, Illinois is a purple state. DuPage County, including the western suburbs of Chicago, on the other hand, has traditionally been a Republican stronghold, although Democrats have gained some ground in the 2012 congressional elections there. The majority of the state is mostly Republican, although the state atmosphere tends to be moderate.

Illinois' electoral college votes have gone towards the Democratic presidential candidate for the past six elections, although its congressional makeup tends to remain evenly balanced between Republicans and Democrats. For years in which a presidential election was held, the table indicates which party's nominees received the state's electoral votes.

Table[edit]

The parties are as follows:       Democratic (D),       Democratic-Republican (DR),       Republican (R), and       a tie or coalition within a group of elected officials.

Year Executive offices General Assembly United States Congress Electoral College votes
Governor Lieutenant Governor Sec. of State Attorney General Comptroller/Auditor Treasurer State Senate State House U.S. Senator (Class 2) U.S. Senator (Class 3) U.S. House
1809 Ninian Edwards (DR)[1] vacant
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
Shadrach Bond (DR) Pierre Menard (DR)
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823 Edward Coles (DR) Adolphus Hubbard (DR)
1824
1825
1826
1827 Ninian Edwards (DR) William Kinney (DR)
1828
1829
1830
1831 John Reynolds (D[2] Zadok Casey (D)[2]
1832
1833
William Lee D. Ewing (D)
1834
William Lee D. Ewing (D)[3] vacant
1835 Joseph Duncan (D) Alexander Jenkins (D)[4]
1836
1837 William H. Davidson (D)
1838
1839 Thomas Carlin (D) Stinson Anderson
1840
1841
1842
1843 Thomas Ford (D) John Moore (D)
1844
1845
1846
1847 Augustus C. French (D) Joseph Wells (D)
1848
1849 William McMurtry (D)
1850
1851
1852
1853 Joel Aldrich Matteson (D) Gustavus Koerner (D)
1854
1855
1856
1857 William Henry Bissell (R)[5] John Wood (R)
1858
1859
1860
John Wood (R)[3] Thomas Marshall (D)
1861 Richard Yates (R) Francis Hoffmann (R)
1862
1863
1864
1865 Richard James Oglesby (R) William Bross (R)
1866
1867
1868
1869 John M. Palmer (R) John Dougherty (R)
1870
1871
1872
1873 Richard James Oglesby (R)[6] John Lourie Beveridge (R)
John Lourie Beveridge (R)[3] John Early (R)
1874
1875 Archibald A. Glenn (D)
1876
1877 Shelby Moore Cullom (R)[7] Andrew Shuman (R)
1878
1879
1880
1881 John Marshall Hamilton (R)
1882
1883
John Marshall Hamilton (R)[3] William Campbell (R)
1884
1885 Richard James Oglesby (R) John Smith (R)
1886
1887
1888
1889 Joseph W. Fifer (R) Lyman Ray (R)
1890
1891
1892
1893 John Peter Altgeld (D) Joseph B. Gill (D) Maurice Moloney (D)
1894
1895
1896
1897 John Riley Tanner (R) William Northcott (R) Edward Akin (R)
1898
1899
1900
1901 Richard Yates (R) Howland Hamlin (R)
1902
1903
1904
1905 Charles S. Deneen (R) Lawrence Sherman (R) William H. Stead (R)
1906
1907
1908
1909 John G. Oglesby (R)
1910
1911
1912
1913 Edward Fitzsimmons Dunne (D) Barratt O'Hara (D) Patrick Lucy (D)
1914 Lewis G. Stevenson (D)
1915
1916
1917 Frank O. Lowden (R) John G. Oglesby (R) Louis L. Emmerson (R) Edward Brundage (R) Len Small (R)
1918
1919
1920
1921 Len Small (R) Fred Sterling (R)
1922
1923
1924
1925 Oscar Carlstrom (R)
1926 Oscar Nelson (R)
1927
1928
1929 Louis Lincoln Emmerson (R) William J. Stratton (R)
1930
1931
1932
1933 Henry Horner (D)[5] Thomas Donovan (D) Otto Kerner, Sr. (D)[8] John Cunningham Martin (D)
1934
1935
1936
1937 John Henry Stelle (D) John Cunningham Martin(D)
1938
1939 John E. Cassidy (D)[9]
1940
John Henry Stelle (D)[3] vacant
1941 Dwight H. Green (R) Hugh W. Cross (R) George F. Barrett (R)
1942
1943
1944
1945 William Stratton (R)
1946
1947
1948
1949 Adlai Stevenson (D) Sherwood Dixon (D) Ivan Elliot (D) Paul Douglas (D)
1950
1951 Everett Dirksen (R) William Stratton (R)
1952
1953 William Stratton (R) John William Chapman (R) Latham Castle (R)[8] Orville E. Hodge (R) Elmer J. Hoffman (R)
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959 Grenville Beardsley (R)[5]
1960 William Guild (R)[9]
1961 Otto Kerner, Jr. (D)[8] Samuel H. Shapiro (D) William G. Clark (D) Michael J. Howlett (D)
1962
1963
1964 Paul Powell (D)
1965
1966
1967 Adlai E. Stevenson III (D) Charles H. Percy (R)
1968
Samuel H. Shapiro (D)[3] vacant
1969 Richard B. Ogilvie (R) Paul Simon (D) William J. Scott (R)[10] Ralph Tyler Smith (R)
1970
1971 Alan J. Dixon (D) Adlai E. Stevenson III (D)
1972
1973 Dan Walker (D) Neil Hartigan (D) Michael J. Howlett (D) George Lindberg(R)
1974
1975
1976
1977 James R. Thompson (R) Dave O'Neal (R)[4] Alan J. Dixon (D) Michael J. Bakalis (D)
1978
1979 Roland Burris (D) Jerome Cosentino (D)
1980 Tyrone C. Fahner (R)[11] Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush (R)
1981 Alan J. Dixon (D)
vacant Jim Edgar (R)[12]
1982
1983 George Ryan (R) Neil Hartigan (D) James Donnewald (D)
1984
1985 Paul Simon (D) 13D, 9R
1986
1987 Jerome Cosentino (D)
1988 George H. W. Bush and Dan Quayle (R)
1989 14D, 8R
1990
1991 Jim Edgar (R) Robert W. Kustra (R)[4] George Ryan (R) Roland Burris (D) Dawn Clark Netsch (D) Pat Quinn (D) 15D, 7R
1992 Bill Clinton and Al Gore (D)
1993 Carol Mosley Braun (D) 12D, 8R
1994
1995 Jim Ryan (R) Loleta Didrickson (R) Judy Baar Topinka (R) 10D, 10R
1996
1997 Richard Durbin (D)
1998
vacant
1999 George Ryan (R) Corinne Wood (R) Jesse White (D) Daniel Hynes (D) Peter Fitzgerald (R)
2000 Al Gore and Joe Lieberman (D)
2001
2002
2003 Rod Blagojevich (D)[13] Pat Quinn (D) Lisa Madigan (D) 10R, 9D
2004 John Kerry and John Edwards (D)
2005 Barack Obama (D)[14] 10D, 9R
2006
2007 Alexi Giannoulias (D) 37D, 22R 66D, 52R
10D, 8R
2008 67D, 51R Barack Obama and Joe Biden (D)
11D, 8R
2009 Pat Quinn (D)[3] vacant 70D, 48R Roland Burris (D)[9] 12D, 7R
2010
2011 Sheila Simon (D) Judy Baar Topinka (R) Dan Rutherford (R) 35D, 24R 64D, 54R Mark Kirk (R) 11R, 8D
2012
2013 40D, 19R 71D, 47R 12D, 6R
Year Governor Lieutenant Governor Sec. of State Attorney General Comptroller/Auditor Treasurer State Senate State House U.S. Senator (Class II) U.S. Senator (Class III) U.S. House Electoral College votes
Executive offices General Assembly United States Congress

Gallery[edit]

Gallery of Illinois election results
Illinois in the 2004 Presidential election. Kerry v. Bush
Illinois in the 2008 Presidential Election. Obama v. McCain
Illinois' gubernatorial race in 2010. Notice Pat Quinn's win despite the rest of the state's overwhelming support for Republican candidate Bill Brady. Notice that Quinn and Giannoulias won the same counties. 
2010 US Senate election results in Illinois. The Republicans gain a seat in the Senate with Mark Kirk's victory. Notice Giannoulias won the same counties as Quinn. 
2004 US Senate election results in Illinois. Obama was elected Senator. 

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Territorial governor.
  2. ^ a b Resigned following election to United States House of Representatives.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g As acting lieutenant governor, filled unexpired term.
  4. ^ a b c Resigned.
  5. ^ a b c Died in office.
  6. ^ Resigned so that Lieutenant Governor John Lourie Beveridge, acting as governor, would appoint him to the United States Senate.
  7. ^ Resigned to take elected seat in the United States Senate.
  8. ^ a b c Resigned to take seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.
  9. ^ a b c Appointed to fill vacancy.
  10. ^ Removed from Office upon tax fraud conviction: "Ex-Illinois Attorney General Loses Tax Conviction Plea". New York Times. 20 September 1980. Retrieved on 11 Feb. 2009.
  11. ^ Appointed to fill Attorney General William J. Scott's term upon Scott's removal from office.
  12. ^ Initially appointed to fill vacancy; later elected in his own right.
  13. ^ Impeached and removed from office by the state legislature on corruption charges.
  14. ^ Resigned following election as president of the United States.
  • Regarding resignations and appointments; the person who held the office for the majority of the year is listed as the office holder for that year.

References[edit]