Political thriller

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A political thriller is a thriller that is set against the backdrop of a political power struggle. They usually involve various extra-legal plots, designed to give political power to someone, while his opponents try to stop him. They can involve national or international political scenarios. Political corruption, terrorism, and warfare are common themes. Normally the political party in power has ulterior motives and often will wish for total Fascist control and will work alone or with a shadow cabinet. Political thrillers can be based on true facts such as the assassination of John F Kennedy or the Watergate Scandal. There is a strong overlap with the conspiracy thriller.

When reviewing the film The Interpreter, Erik Lundegaard attempted a definition:

The basic plot is an ordinary man pulling an innocent thread which leads to a mess of corruption. The corruption should be political or governmental in nature.[1]

Literature[edit]

Before 1950 there were spy novels with political elements. The actual political thriller came to life in the early days of the Cold War. Graham Greene's The Quiet American (1955) tells about the American involvement in Vietnam during the First Indochina War. Richard Condon's The Manchurian Candidate (1962) is set in the aftermath of the Korean War and the days of McCarthyism. In Frederick Forsyth's The Day of the Jackal an assault on Charles de Gaulle has to be prevented.

Other authors of political thrillers include Jeffrey Archer and Daniel Silva.

Film[edit]

Several Alfred Hitchcock films already contain elements of the political thriller. In The Man Who Knew Too Much a political assault has to be prevented. In 1962 John Frankenheimer made a film adaptation of The Manchurian Candidate. All the President's Men is based on the Watergate Scandal. Other examples of political thrillers are Z, Three Days of the Condor, JFK, V For Vendetta and City Hall. Several post-9/11 political thriller films refer to the September 11 attacks or terrorism in general.

Producer Kevin Feige described the film Captain America: The Winter Soldier as a political thriller masquerading as a superhero movie, in terms of tone and style.

Theater[edit]

A playwright who has embraced the genre is Gary Mitchell, who in the 2000s became "one of the most talked about voices in European theatre ... whose political thrillers have arguably made him Northern Ireland's greatest playwright".[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lundegaard, Erik (1 August 2006). "The Manchurian movie - Who took the politics out of the political thriller?". MSNBC Movie Options. Retrieved 2007-05-03. 
  2. ^ Loyalist paramilitaries drive playwright from his homeThe Guardian news article, 21 December 2005.