Polly Horvath

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Polly Horvath (born 30 January 1957) is an American-Canadian author of novels for children and young adults. She won the 2003 U.S. National Book Award for Young People's Literature for The Canning Season, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.[1]

Horvath was born and raised in Kalamazoo, Michigan. She's been writing since the age of eight. She attended college in Toronto as well as the Canadian College of Dance. She lived in New York City and Montreal before settling on southern Vancouver Island in British Columbia.[2]

She was a finalist for the U.S. National Book Award for Young People's Literature in 1999 (The Trolls)[3] and a runner-up for the Newbery Medal in 2002 (Everything on a Waffle)[4] before winning the National Book Award. She won the TD Canadian Children's Literature Award in 2013 for One Year in Coal Harbor.

Horvath once declared: "I don't have that much fun writing them. I have the most fun when I'm on the last page."

She is married to Arnie Keller. They have two daughters, Emily and Rebecca.

Books[edit]

  • An Occasional Cow (1989)
  • No More Cornflakes (1990)
  • The Happy Yellow Car (1994)
  • When the Circus Came to Town (1996)
  • The Trolls (1999) — finalist, U.S. National Book Award;[3] honor book, Boston Globe-Horn Book Award
  • Everything on a Waffle (2001) — Newbery Honor;[4] Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor; International White Ravens 2002; Sheila A. Egoff Children's Literature Prize (British Columbia Book Prize for Children's Literature)
  • The Canning Season (2003) — Young Adult Canadian Book of the Year; U.S. National Book Award[1]
  • The Pepins and their Problems (2004)
  • The Vacation (2005)
  • The Corps of the Bare-Boned Plane (2007) — Sheila A. Egoff Children's Literature Prize; finalist, Canadian Library Association's Young Adult Book of the Year
  • My One Hundred Adventures (2008): Sheila A. Egoff Children's Literature Prize; NAPPA Gold Award; Parent's Choice Gold Award
  • Northward to the Moon (2010)
  • Mr. and Mrs. Bunny—Detectives Extraordinaire! (2012)
  • One Year in Coal Harbor (2012)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Book Awards – 2003". National Book Foundation (NBF). Retrieved 2012-01-26.
    (With acceptance speech by Horvath an introduction by jury chair Susan Campbell Bartoletti: this year's entries "reveal that there are few or no subject boundaries left between books for young people and books for adults.")
  2. ^ "About Polly Horvath". Polly Horvath. Retrieved 2012-03-26.
  3. ^ a b "National Book Awards – 1999". NBF. Retrieved 2012-01-26.
  4. ^ a b "Newbery Medal and Honor Books, 1922–Present". Association for Library Service to Children. (ALSC). American Library Association (ALA).
      "The John Newbery Medal". ALSC. ALA. Retrieved 2012-04-15.

External links[edit]