Pompton Lakes, New Jersey

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Pompton Lakes, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Pompton Lakes
Map of Pompton Lakes in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Pompton Lakes in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pompton Lakes, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pompton Lakes, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°00′11″N 74°17′08″W / 41.003095°N 74.285455°W / 41.003095; -74.285455Coordinates: 41°00′11″N 74°17′08″W / 41.003095°N 74.285455°W / 41.003095; -74.285455[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Passaic
Founded 1682[3]
Incorporated February 26, 1895
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Kathleen M. Cole (term ends December 31, 2014)[4]
 • Administrator Kevin Boyle[5]
 • Clerk Elizabeth Brandsness[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 3.191 sq mi (8.267 km2)
 • Land 2.913 sq mi (7.545 km2)
 • Water 0.278 sq mi (0.721 km2)  8.73%
Area rank 326th of 566 in state
12th of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 217 ft (66 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10][11]
 • Total 11,097
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 11,137
 • Rank 221st of 566 in state
11th of 16 in county[13]
 • Density 3,809.1/sq mi (1,470.7/km2)
 • Density rank 163rd of 566 in state
9th of 16 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07442[14][15]
Area code(s) 862/973[16]
FIPS code 3403160090[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885359[19][2]
Website www.pomptonlakesgov.com

Pompton Lakes is a borough in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 11,097,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 457 (+4.3%) from the 10,640 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 101 (+1.0%) from the 10,539 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Pompton Lakes was formed as a borough on February 26, 1895, from portions of Pompton Township, based on the results of a referendum held three days earlier.[21] Pompton Lakes was the first borough to be formed in Passaic County, as the "boroughitis" that had struck elsewhere hit the county. The newly formed borough did not acquire territory from more than one township, which would have entitled Pompton Lakes to a seat on the Board of chosen freeholders.[22]

An outer-ring suburb of New York City, Pompton Lakes is located approximately 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Midtown Manhattan. From the higher mountains in and around the borough one can see the New York City skyline. Three rivers, the Ramapo, Pequannock and Wanaque, run through the Borough, providing many relaxing year-round activities for Pompton Lakes residents.

Geography[edit]

Pompton Lakes is located at 41°00′11″N 74°17′08″W / 41.003095°N 74.285455°W / 41.003095; -74.285455 (41.003095,-74.285455). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.191 square miles (8.267 km2), of which, 2.913 square miles (7.545 km2) of it is land and 0.278 square miles (0.721 km2) of it (8.73%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 847
1910 1,060 25.1%
1920 2,008 89.4%
1930 3,104 54.6%
1940 3,189 2.7%
1950 4,654 45.9%
1960 9,445 102.9%
1970 11,397 20.7%
1980 10,660 −6.5%
1990 10,539 −1.1%
2000 10,640 1.0%
2010 11,097 4.3%
Est. 2012 11,137 [12] 0.4%
Population sources: 1900-1920[23]
1900-1910[24] 1910-1930[25]
1930-1990[26] 2000[27][28] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 11,097 people, 4,190 households, and 2,933 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,809.1 per square mile (1,470.7 /km2). There were 4,341 housing units at an average density of 1,490.1 per square mile (575.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 87.93% (9,758) White, 1.41% (157) Black or African American, 0.11% (12) Native American, 5.39% (598) Asian, 0.02% (2) Pacific Islander, 3.37% (374) from other races, and 1.77% (196) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.89% (1,209) of the population.[8]

There were 4,190 households, of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.20.[8]

In the borough, 22.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 29.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.2 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.9 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,352 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,890) and the median family income was $97,074 (+/- $10,183). Males had a median income of $61,426 (+/- $7,225) versus $50,203 (+/- $4,456) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,872 (+/- $3,011). About 2.0% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Same-sex couples headed 29 households in 2010, almost double the 15 counted in 2000.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 10,640 people, 3,949 households, and 2,803 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,585.7 people per square mile (1,383.2/km2). There were 4,024 housing units at an average density of 1,356.1 per square mile (523.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.01% White, 1.21% African American, 0.19% Native American, 3.03% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.57% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.74% of the population.[27][28]

There were 3,949 households out of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.0% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.24.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.2% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 33.0% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $65,648, and the median income for a family was $74,701. Males had a median income of $46,776 versus $38,221 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,802. About 1.6% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Veterans Memorial Park.

Pompton Lakes is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Pompton Lakes Borough is Kathleen M. Cole, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015.[31] Members of the Pompton Lakes Borough Council are Council President Richard Steele (2014), William Baig (2013), Lloyd Kent (2014), Terri Reicher (2015), Michael Serra (2015) and Michael Simone, Jr. (2013).[32][33]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Pompton Lakes is located in the 11th Congressional District[34] and is part of New Jersey's 40th state legislative district.[9][35][36] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Pompton Lakes had been in the 26th state legislative district.[37] Prior to the 2010 Census, Pompton Lakes had been part of the 8th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[37]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[41][42]

The 40th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Kevin J. O'Toole (R, Cedar Grove) and in the General Assembly by Scott Rumana (R, Wayne) and David C. Russo (R, Ridgewood).[43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected to staggered three-year terms office on an at-large basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[46] As of 2013, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce James (D, term ends December 31, 2014; Clifton),[47] Freeholder Deputy Director Theodore O. Best Jr. (D, 2014; Paterson),[48] John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne), Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood), Terry Duffy (D, 2013; West Milford),[49] Pat Lepore (D, 2013; Woodland Park)[50] and Hector C. Lora (D, 2015; Passaic).[51][52] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (2014),[53] Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik[54] and Surrogate Bernice Toledo.[55]

Highlands protection[edit]

The Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act regulates development in portions of Oakland and Mahwah that are included in the New Jersey Highlands geographic region.

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,357 registered voters in Pompton Lakes, of which 1,726 (23.5% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,006 (27.3% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 3,623 (49.2% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[56] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 66.3% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 85.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[56][57]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,803 votes here (50.6% vs. 37.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,567 votes (46.3% vs. 58.8%) and other candidates with 53 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 5,541 ballots cast by the borough's 7,587 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.0% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County).[58] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,847 votes here (53.9% vs. 42.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,330 votes (44.1% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 45 votes (0.9% vs. 0.7%), among the 5,283 ballots cast by the borough's 7,217 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).[59]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,848 votes here (52.5% vs. 43.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,389 votes (39.4% vs. 50.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 196 votes (5.6% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 45 votes (1.3% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,523 ballots cast by the borough's 7,298 registered voters, yielding a 48.3% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).[60]

Education[edit]

The Pompton Lakes School District serves students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[61]) are Lenox School[62] (grades K-5; 341 students), Lincoln School[63] (K-5; 335), Lakeside Middle School[64] (6-8; 261) and Pompton Lakes High School[65] (9-12; 540).[66] Students from Riverdale (in Morris County) attend the high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Riverdale School District.[67][68]

St. Mary's School is a Catholic school for pre-K through 8th grade students that operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson.[69]

Community[edit]

The community of Pompton Lakes is largely based around organized events, including high school sports, senior citizen gatherings, and various group activities organized by the Pompton Lakes Recreation Committee. There is a public library, with regularly scheduled reading groups and other programs. The Committee runs summer sports at St. Mary's and other classes at the Civic Center and Elks Lodge. They also run the Teen Center, which has many dances and events. The Elks Lodge hosts numerous events and Bingo Nights.

Pompton Day, the town's major end-of-summer event, takes place every Labor Day weekend along the lake, with many vendors participating among popular events and a firework show ending the day. Other popular town events are the Holiday Stroll, The Memorial Day Parade, and Trick-or-Treating downtown.

Media[edit]

WGHT (formerly WKER), a daytime-only station (airing from 6:00 AM to 8:00 PM) is located in Pompton Lakes. At 1500 on the AM dial, WGHT has become northern New Jersey's #1 Oldies station since WCBS-FM switched to Jack FM in June 2005. The transmitting tower for William Paterson University's - WP 88.7 FM is also located in the borough.

The Pompton Lakes Council runs a Pompton Lakes informational channel named PLTV77. The station airs on Cablevision channel 77.

Films/movies[edit]

The comedy In & Out was partially filmed at the Pompton Lakes High School.[70]

Parks[edit]

The Ramapo Mountain State Forest is in the northernmost part of the borough.[71] There are also eight municipal parks: Hershfield Park, Stiles Park, Gallo-Pacifico Park, Lakeside Park, Veterans Memorial Park, Federal Square, Willow Park, and John Murrin Park.

Sports[edit]

Pompton Lakes and Riverdale share their sports teams. The PLRLL (Pompton Lakes-Riverdale Little League) manages the baseball teams, while the PLRYO (Pompton Lakes-Riverdale Youth Organization) manages football & cheerleading. The PLRSA (Pompton Lakes Riverdale Soccer Association) manages the soccer teams. The Board of Education manages all of the high school sports plus the Lakeside and Hershfield Park Fields. Lakeside Field is used for high school Girls soccer. Carlough Field is used for the Jr. Cardinals football team. The Hershfield Park Fields are used for the Cardinals high school football team and high school track & field. They also consist of three baseball fields, four tennis courts, and a skatepark. Joe Grill Sports Complex, in the southwestern-most point in Pompton Lakes, consists of two baseball field, one large field that is used for baseball and soccer, a softball field, and two t-ball fields. Willow Fields, just south of Joe Grill, consists of a soccer field and a baseball field. Independence Park, which is the only field in Riverdale, consists of two baseball fields, Independence and Freedom Field. Other venues used for athletic activities include Lincoln School, Lennox School, Lakeside School, and Pompton Lakes High School. Some of the sports held in these locations include basketball, wrestling, fencing, and others.

Transportation[edit]

Pompton Lakes station and caboose, both of which were served by the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway, as seen in the winter of 2011

Major roads through Pompton Lakes includes Interstate 287 and Paterson-Hamburg Turnpike.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to and from New York City on the 193, 194 and 197 routes to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, to Newark on the 75 and local service on the 748 line.[72]

Commerce[edit]

The downtown core is located along Wanaque Avenue. There is an ongoing revitalization project in place for the downtown, as commerce has been generally unimpressive, with some of the older buildings needing extensive renovations. The Downtown Revitalization project has generally been successful, as the final stages are now being completed. In the heyday of the Downtown area, which was the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s, there was a wide variety of small boutiques, ethnic food stores, and other small, generally family run businesses. Nowadays, there are a few boutiques and consignment stores. There are also popular Thai, Chinese, and Mexican restaurants and a few classic Italian pizzerias.

The town has a small industrial section located along Cannonball Road. The end of the road is home to the DuPont works site, which was shut down in the early 1990s, but it still owned by DuPont. Several lawsuits have emerged in the last decade with regards to water contamination and ground gas seepage due to decades of dumping on the DuPont site. DuPont has been involved in groundwater and topsoil remediation throughout the area of the town which was affected: a swath of land adjacent to Acid Brook and the part of town known as DuPont village.

Pompton Lakes' largest retail hub is the Pompton Lakes Town Square, which is located on the site of the former Klugetown Shopping Center and is anchored by an A&P supermarket. The former Klugetown Shopping Center was anchored by two barrel-roofed stores on either end of the strip, with a Ben Franklin store at one end and an Acme supermarket at the opposite end. On October 27, 1997, a small electrical fire that started in the roof of the Acme store quickly spread due to the wooden roof trusses the entire strip mall had been constructed with when it first opened. Although Pompton Lakes fire department vehicles were on the scene in 2-3 minutes, the fire had already begun to rage out of control and there was no chance of saving the buildings. The entire Klugetown center burned to the ground as several fire departments from surrounding towns were called in to assist Pompton Lakes' department in fighting the inferno. Ten businesses were destroyed and the property was regarded as a total loss. Although an investigation determined that the fire had started before the employees arrived in the store and was not deliberately set, the chief of the fire department had two Acme employees arrested and charged with arson. Though the county prosecutor declined to prosecute, the two employees sued and won a resulting civil suit against the fire department for false-light and malicious prosecution claims that totaled more than $1 million.[73]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Pompton Lakes include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ William D. Halsey, ed. (1976). "Pompton Lakes". Collier's Encyclopedia 19. Macmillan Educational Corporation. p. 236. 
  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  5. ^ a b Borough Contact Information, Borough of Pompton Lakes. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 121.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Pompton Lakes, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pompton Lakes borough, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 16. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Pompton Lakes borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  11. ^ Staff. "Census 2010: Pompton Lakes", The Record (Bergen County), February 9, 2011. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pompton Lakes, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
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  22. ^ "PASSAIC COUNTY'S FIRST BOROUGH; To be Called Pompton Lakes and to Have an Election Saturday.", The New York Times, January 14, 1895. Accessed July 14, 2008. "The borough fever has broken out in Passaic County, and a petition signed by the lawful number of residents will be presented to Judge Hopper in the Passaic Common Pleas to-morrow."
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  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Pompton Lakes borough, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  30. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed January 14, 2012.
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  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  52. ^ Patberg, Zach. "Democrats take full control of Passaic County freeholder board", The Record (Bergen County), January 4, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Ronda Casson Cotroneo, a family law attorney, wants [to] establish a program that links lawyers and counselors with victims of domestic violence. John Bartlett, also a lawyer, imagines more parks, calling them the county’s 'undiscovered gem.'... Lora, a Passaic city councilman, says better communication with constituents is the key to good government, whether through handshakes or social media."
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  61. ^ School Data for the Pompton Lakes School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 14, 2013.
  62. ^ Lenox School, Pompton Lakes School District. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  63. ^ Lincoln School, Pompton Lakes School District. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  64. ^ Lakeside Middle School, Pompton Lakes School District. Accessed August 7, 2013.
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  67. ^ Pompton Lakes High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 7, 2013. "Set in a quaint lakeside community that is rich in pride and tradition, Pompton Lakes High School serves both the townships of Pompton Lakes and Riverdale."
  68. ^ Superintendent's Welcome, Pompton Lakes School District. Accessed July 3, 2012. "Pompton Lakes enjoys a sending-receiving relationship with the borough of Riverdale; these students attend Pompton Lakes High School."
  69. ^ Passaic County Elementary Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  70. ^ Randall, Laura. "BLACKBOARD: FUND-RAISING; They Want To Be in Movies", The New York Times, April 25, 2004. Accessed September 9, 2009.
  71. ^ Ramapo Mountain State Forest, New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. Accessed August 7, 2013. "The forest, which includes wild lands in the municipalities of Oakland, Pompton Lakes, Ringwood and Wanaque, borders Ringwood State Park and the Ramapo Valley County Reservation, a part of the Bergen County Park System."
  72. ^ Passaic County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  73. ^ Jobes v. Evangelista, FindLaw. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  74. ^ Barry, Jan. "AUTHOR REVISITS SCENE OF NOVEL -- TELLS STUDENTS DREAMS CAN COME TRUE", The Record (Bergen County), December 12, 2000. Accessed August 14, 2007. "Cathy Bauer couldn't wait to graduate from Pompton Lakes High and get out into the world."
  75. ^ CECIL B. DeMILLE. Accessed July 27, 2007. "The world-renowned motion picture producer and director spent a good portion of his youth in Pompton Lakes."
  76. ^ Fox, Ron. "WHERE'S WHAT'S-HIS-NAME", The Record (Bergen County), May 1, 1993. Accessed August 13, 2008. "At Pompton Lakes High School, Charlie Getty was All-State in football and track, and a State bronze medalist in wrestling."
  77. ^ Smith, Dinitia. "Gary Jennings Is Dead at 70; Author of the Best Seller 'Aztec'", The New York Times, February 18, 1999. Accessed July 3, 2012. "Gary Jennings, a prolific writer whose books included the best-selling novel Aztec, about the Aztec war against the Spanish conquistadors, died on Saturday at his home in Pompton Lakes, N.J."
  78. ^ Anderson, Dave. "Sports of The Times; The Monument Where Joe Louis Trained", The New York Times, May 30, 1999. Accessed July 3, 2012. "WHEN Joe Louis was the heavyweight champion, he put this leafy little town on the map. 'When I was in the Pacific during the war,' Russ Pagana, a retired contractor, was saying, 'guys would ask me where I was from. When I'd say, Pompton Lakes, N.J., they'd say, Yeah, that's where Joe Louis trains.' And now the town has put Joe Louis on a monument."
  79. ^ Wojcik, Michael. "Songs of Redemption: Former Pompton Lakes parishioner returns 'home' to perform with new music ministry, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed October 29, 2007. "The holiday concert marked a homecoming of sorts for the 47-year-old Monarque, a local boy who made good in Tinsletown. Born and raised in Pompton Lakes, he considers himself a child of St. Mary's, where he sang in the parish choir, learned religious studies and attended retreats."
  80. ^ Staff. "Writer of Stories About Dogs. Stricken at Pompton Lakes. His Kennel Famous. Did Screen Work. Published 'Lad: A Dog,' First in Canine Series, in 1919.", The New York Times, February 19, 1942. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  81. ^ Staff. "MRS. VAN DE WATER, NOVELIST, IS DEAD; Mother of Author, Sister of Albert Payson Terhune, Was Noted for Popular Fiction", The New York Times, October 18, 1945. Accessed February 8, 2011. "Mrs. Virginia Terhune Van de Water, novelist and short story writer, widow of Frederic Franklyn Van de Water, and mother of Frederic F. Van de Water, author, died yesterday at her home, Kanesata, Pompton Lakes, N.J., after a long illness."
  82. ^ "A Talk with Marion Harland at Her Home in New Jersey.". The New York Times. May 17, 1902. Retrieved 2010-06-18. "The name of Sunnybank, an old homestead in Virginia which is also the title of her eighth novel, appropriately names Marion Harland's present home on Ramapo Lake, in the picturesque Valley of Pompton, in New Jersey" 
  83. ^ Graziano, Dan. "N.J. native Michael Weiner in line to become head of MLBPA", NewJerseyNewsroom.com, June 26, 2009. Accessed May 24, 2011. "Weiner's New Jersey roots run deep. He was born on Dec. 21, 1961 in Paterson, where his mother and father were raised and went to high school. The family moved to Pompton Lakes when Weiner was two years old, and he went to high school there."
  84. ^ Staff. "DE-TOUR HOLE HAS LEFT, MONSTER MAGNET IS MISSING, BUT MARILYN MANSON ROLLS ON", Fort Wayne News Sentinel, April 15, 1999. Accessed February 8, 2011. "Twiggy a 26-year-old native of Pompton Lakes, NJ, real name Jeordie White, says he had a normal childhood for a divorced kid before relocating to Fort Lauderdale."
  85. ^ Dr. Hook's John Wolters, VH1. Accessed February 8, 2011. "John Wolters was the drummer for country-rock act Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show, later known simply as Dr. Hook on their late '70s and early '80s hits. He was born John Christian Wolters on April 28, 1945, in Pompton Lakes, N.J."

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