Bontnewydd Palaeolithic site

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Map of Bontnewydd Palaeolithic site
Map of Bontnewydd Palaeolithic site
Bontnewydd
Denbighshire

The Bontnewydd Palaeolithic site (also known in its unmutated form as Pontnewydd Welsh language: 'New bridge') is an archaeological site near St Asaph, Denbighshire, Wales which has yielded one of the earliest known remains of Neanderthals in Britain. It is located a few yards east of the River Elwy, near the hamlet of Bontnewydd, near Cefn Meiriadog, Denbighshire.

Palaeolithic site[edit]

Ogof Bontnewydd Cave Sir Ddinbych 11.JPG

Bontnewydd was excavated from 1978 by a team from the University of Wales, led by Dr Stephen Aldhouse Green. Teeth and part of a jawbone excavated in the cave in 1981 were dated to 230,000 years ago. The bone is from a Neanderthal boy approximately eleven years old.[1]

Based on the morphology and age of the teeth, particularly the evidence of taurodontism (enlarged pulp cavities and short roots), the teeth are believed to belong to a group of Neanderthals who hunted game in the vale of Elwy in an interglacial period.[2]

Neanderthal from the period

The site is the most north-western site in Eurasia for remains of early hominids and is considered of international importance.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Gathering the Jewels". Early Neanderthal jaw fragment, c. 230,000 years old. Culturenet Cymru. 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-25. [dead link]
  2. ^ Museum of Wales 2007

References[edit]

Coordinates: 53°13′38″N 3°28′35″W / 53.2271°N 3.4763°W / 53.2271; -3.4763