Porga of Croatia

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Porga
Duke of Croatia
Reign c. 660–c. 680
Father Unnamed Croatian prince

Porga, Porgas or Borko (ca. 660–680) was one of the first dukes or princes (Croatian: knez) of Littoral Croatia.

History[edit]

De Administrando Imperio[edit]

The De Administrando Imperio mentions that Emperor Heraclius (r. 610–641) settled the White Croats in Croatia after they had expelled the Avars, during the rule of Porga's father.[1] He then continues that Heraclius sent priests from Rome, and appointed an archbishop, a bishop, elders and deacons of these, and baptized the Croats, which were then under the rule of Porgas.[1]

Modern historiography[edit]

Croatian historian Ivo Omrčanin believed that Porga would have ruled in ca. 660–ca. 680, while his father would have ruled ca. 635–ca. 660.[2]

H. H. Howorth in The Spread of the Slaves (1878) believed Porga to be the son of one of the five brothers who had left White Croatia.[3] Howorth noted that the name was uncommon, and mentioned Schafarik who compared the name to Purgas, which was the name of a Mordwin chief mentioned in 1229, making it possible that the Croats were subjects to alien princes, perhaps Avars.[3] However, as Franjo Rački points out, "Porga" could also have been just an alien transcription of a rather common Slavic name, Borko.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Constantine Porphyrogenitus (1967), p. 149
  2. ^ Ivo Omrčanin (1972). Diplomatic and political history of Croatia. Dorrance. pp. 247–. 
  3. ^ a b Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, JSTOR (Organization) (1878). Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 7. p. 331. Their prince at this time was named Porga, the son of one of the five brothers already named. Porga is a curious and uncommon name, apparently not Slavic ; and Schafarik compares it with Purgas, the name of a Mordwin chief mentioned in the year 1229 (op. cit., ii, 280, note), a fact which makes it probable that the Croats were at this time subject to alien princes, perhaps of Avar descent. 
  4. ^ Franjo Rački, Documenta historiae Croaticae periodum antiaquam illustrantia, p. 291

Sources[edit]

Preceded by
Duke of Littoral Croatia
ca. 660–680
Succeeded by
Budimir