Port of Anchorage

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Coordinates: 61°14′25″N 149°53′10″W / 61.24028°N 149.88611°W / 61.24028; -149.88611
Anchorage
Port
Anchorage Alaska aerial view.jpg
Oblique aerial view of the Port of Anchorage, Alaska in 1999
Official name: Port of Anchorage
Named for: 1915 Alaska Railroad construction townsite and P.O.
Country United States
State Alaska
Borough Anchorage
Township T13-14N,R3-4W Seward Meridian
Municipality Anchorage
Borders on Kenai Peninsula, Matanuska-Susitna, Valdez-Cordova
City Anchorage
Location Knik Arm, Cook Inlet, Pacific Ocean
 - elevation 16 ft (5 m) [1]
 - coordinates 61°14′25″N 149°53′10″W / 61.24028°N 149.88611°W / 61.24028; -149.88611 [1]
Founded 1961
Management Anchorage Port Commission
Owner Municipality of Anchorage
Port Director William Sheffield[disambiguation needed]
 - Deputy Port Director Stephen Ribuffo
 - Port Engineer Todd Cowles, P.E.
 - Director,
Finance & Administration
Edward Leon
 - Manager,
Operations/Maintenance
Stuart Greydanus
Timezone AKST (UTC-9)
 - summer (DST) AKDT (UTC-8)
ZIP code 99501
Area code +1 907
USGS GNIS 1424961
Topo map USGS Anchorage, Alaska
Annual Tonnage 2,926,536 (2006)
Annual TEUsA[›] 280848 (2006)
Location of Anchorage in Alaska
Wikimedia Commons: Anchorage, Alaska
Statistics: www.muni.org/port/faq.cfm
Website: www.muni.org/port/  • portofanchorage.org

The Port of Anchorage is a critical link between the U.S. state and Alaska, providing an estimated 90% of the merchandise cargo to 80% of Alaska's populated areas. The Port of Anchorage also provides essential fuel supplies to the Anchorage and southcentral area and serves as the entry point for additional goods and cargo distributed to rural Alaskan communities. It is located just north of Ship Creek, near downtown Anchorage, on the Knik Arm of the Cook Inlet of the Pacific Ocean.

Geography[edit]

The Port of Anchorage is located on the Anchorage side of the Knik Arm of the Cook Inlet on the Pacific Ocean.

Climate[edit]

The Port of Anchorage operates year-round, but the Knik Arm of the Cook Inlet freezes over with pan ice from mid-fall through mid-spring.

Ice[edit]

Between October 17 and November 17, the Knik Arm of the Cook Inlet ices or freezes over for the winter.[2]

Between March 10 and May 15, the ice breaks up for the summer.[2]

History[edit]

The Port of Anchorage began operations in September 1961, and in its first year over 38,000 tons of marine cargo moved across its single berth. It was the only port in South Central Alaska to survive the 1964 Good Friday Earthquake and became the main shipping hub for consumer and essential goods entering southcentral Alaska. The Port has since expanded to a five-berth terminal providing facilities for the movement of containerized freight, iron and steel products, bulk petroleum, and cement. The peak of the port's operations occurred in 2005 when, for the first time, more than 5 million tons of various commodities moved across its docks.[3]

Anchorage is served regularly by two major carriers, Horizon Lines, Inc. and Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE), which bring four to five ships weekly from Tacoma, Washington. Petroleum tankers supply jet fuel for airport operations, barges on-load petroleum products for western and Interior Alaska, and ships from Japan and Korea call frequently, transporting construction materials, pipeline for the north slope, or loading refined petroleum.[3]

A 128.96-acre (52.19 ha) industrial park adjoins the port to the east. Approximately 80.87 acres (32.73 ha) of the park are under long-term lease to various port users. Additionally, there are 31.0 acres (12.5 ha) for the staging and storage of marine cargo in transit. However, a majority of that acreage is presently occupied by the two major general cargo carriers. In order to maintain market dominance, the port will need to accommodate larger ships, be able to unload containers using better and bigger cranes, and ensure continued service to city businesses, citizens, and the state. As the port celebrates its 50th year of service in 2011, the current facility is deteriorated and must be replaced, leaving the port extremely vulnerable to failure following a large seimic event. The port needs to modernize the necessary infrastructure and intermodal transportation links needed to meet future demands.[3]

Future[edit]

To that end, starting in 2003, the Port of Anchorage undertook an initiative to expand and modernize. This will allow the port to double in size and be a world-class Intermodal facility capable of not only better supporting its current tenants but also positioning it to take advantage of growing opportunities being presented by changes occurring in the global shipping industry. When complete, the Port of Anchorage Intermodal Expansion Project will construct a wharf designed to a higher degree of seismic stability with the addition of three "essential facilities" designed to remain operational following a large seismic event.[3]

Connections[edit]

Rail[edit]

Direct connection to Alaska Railroad a Class II railroad serving South Central Alaska and Interior Alaska.

Truck[edit]

Nearby truck access to the Alaska intrastate highway routes:

Facilities[edit]

Maritime Services[edit]

Port facilities include five berths and 0 feet (0 m) of linear dock space. Docks are maintained at a full seaway depth, which is 35 feet (11 m) to 45 feet (14 m).[4]

The docks have excellent direct connections with the Alaska Railroad, and highway connections to Alaska intrastate highway routes.

? terminal operators use port facilities:

Berths[edit]

Dock
Berth
Length
Warehouse
Storage
Facilities
Tenants
1 0 feet (0 m)
2 0 feet (0 m)
3 0 feet (0 m) 0 square feet (0 m2)
4 0 feet (0 m) 0 square feet (0 m2)
5 0 feet (0 m)

Anchorage Terminal[edit]

Cargo[edit]

Annual Tonnage[edit]

Tonnage for Port of Anchorage
Year
U.S.
Rank
Total
Tons
Domestic
Tons
Foreign
Total
Tons
Foreign
Imports
Tons
Foreign
Exports
Tons
Reference
2006 102 2,926,536 2,306,192 620,344 464,774 155,570 [5]
2005 94 3,527,469 2,629,553 897,916 430,396 467,520 [6]
2004 101 3,085,753 2,323,089 762,664 284,347 478,317 [7]
2003 96 3,178,633 2,494,261 684,372 218,233 466,139 [8]
2002 102 2,983,137 2,318,653 664,484 251,203 413,281 [9]
2001 108 2,861,134 2,157,496 703,638 225,281 478,357 [10]
2000 103 3,157,247 2,416,514 740,733 382,240 358,493 [11]

Annual Container Traffic[edit]

U.S. Waterborne Container Traffic for Port of Anchorage, Loaded and Empty TEUs A[›]
Year
Domestic
Inbound
Loaded
TEUs
Domestic
Inbound
Empty
TEUs
Domestic
Outbound
Loaded
TEUs
Domestic
Outbound
Empty
TEUs
Domestic
Total
TEUs
Foreign
Inbound
Loaded
TEUs
Foreign
Outbound
Loaded
TEUs
Foreign
Total
Loaded
TEUs
Grand
Total
Loaded
TEUs
References
2006 227,126 523 47,641 3,216 278,506 0 2,342 2,342 277,109 [12]
2005 231,274 656 59,864 25,379 317,173 299 1,881 2,180 293,318 [13]
2004 440,559 207 161,301 61,441 663,508 1,880 527 2,407 604,267 [14]
2003 223,962 183 58,056 10,423 292,623 383 347 730 282,748 [15]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

^ A: TEU means Twenty-foot equivalent units. Foreign empties are not included.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Port of Anchorage". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2009-05-03. 
  2. ^ a b "Technical Report - Marine Ice Atlas for Cook Inlet, Alaska - Table 3 - Northern Cook Inlet" (PDF). Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Port of Anchorage - History". Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska. 
  4. ^ "Anchorage Harbor Navigation" (PDF). Civil Works Branch, Alaska District, Pacific Ocean Division, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  5. ^ "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2006, Sorted by Port Name". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  6. ^ "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2005, Sorted by Port Name". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  7. ^ "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2004, Sorted by Port Name". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  8. ^ "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2003, Sorted by Port Name". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  9. ^ "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2002, Sorted by Port Name". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  10. ^ "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2001, Sorted by Port Name". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  11. ^ "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2000, Sorted by Port Name". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Waterborne Container Traffic by Port/Waterway in 2006, Loaded and Empty TEUS". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  13. ^ "U.S. Waterborne Container Traffic by Port/Waterway in 2005, Loaded and Empty TEUS". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  14. ^ "U.S. Waterborne Container Traffic by Port/Waterway in 2004, Loaded and Empty TEUS". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 
  15. ^ "U.S. Waterborne Container Traffic by Port/Waterway in 2003, Loaded and Empty TEUS". Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, Navigation Data Center, United States Army Corps of Engineers. 

General References[edit]

External links[edit]