Muuga Harbour

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Muuga Harbour
Muuga.jpg
Aerial view of the Muuga Harbour
Location
Country Estonia
Location Viimsi and Jõelähtme parishes and Maardu
Coordinates 59°29′30″N 24°57′30″E / 59.49167°N 24.95833°E / 59.49167; 24.95833Coordinates: 59°29′30″N 24°57′30″E / 59.49167°N 24.95833°E / 59.49167; 24.95833
Details
Opened 1986
Operated by Port of Tallinn
Type of harbor cargo port
Size of harbor 7.52 square kilometres (752 ha)
Land area 5.242 square kilometres (524.2 ha)
Available berths 29
Statistics
Annual container volume 251,738 TEU's (2013) [1]
Website
http://www.portoftallinn.com/muuga-harbour

Muuga Harbour (Estonian: Muuga sadam) is the largest cargo port in Estonia, located on the southern coast of the Gulf of Finland, 13 km northeast of the capital Tallinn, in Maardu. The harbour is administrated by Port of Tallinn, the biggest port authority in Estonia. Muuga Harbour is one of the few ice-free ports in northernmost Europe and among the deepest (up to 18 m) and most modern ports in the Baltic Sea region. The cargo volume handled accounts for around 80% of the total cargo volume of Port of Tallinn and approximately 90% of the transit cargo volume passing through Estonia. Nearly 3/4 of cargo loaded in Muuga Harbour includes crude oil and oil products, but the harbour also serves dry bulk (mostly fertilizers, grain and coal) and other types of cargo.

The usual cargo traffic in the seaport is about 20–30 million tons.

The harbour covers an area of 5.24 km2 land and 7.5 km2 aquatory. Besides Maardu the seaport also occupies lands from the villages of Muuga and Uusküla.

There are 29 quays with the whole length of 6.4 km (4.0 mi). The maximum depth is 18.0 m (0.0112 mi). The largest possible size of a ship is 300 ✕ 48 meters.

There are 6 liquid bulk terminals, container, grain, coal, steel and a dry bulk terminals located in the port.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Container turnover of Transiidikeskus grew by 12% in 2013". The Baltic Course. 16 January 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014. 

External links[edit]