Portal:Anime and Manga

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Anime and manga portal

Introduction

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Anime (アニメ?) refers to the animation style originated in Japan. It is characterized by distinctive characters and backgrounds (hand-drawn or computer-generated) that visually and thematically set it apart from other forms of animation. Storylines may include a variety of fictional or historical characters, events, and settings. Anime is aimed at a broad range of audiences and consequently, a given series may have aspects of a range of genres. Anime is most frequently broadcast on television or sold on DVDs and other media, either after their broadcast run or directly as original video animation (OVA). Console and computer games sometimes also feature segments or scenes that can be considered anime.

Manga (漫画?) is Japanese for "comics" or "whimsical images". Manga developed from a mixture of ukiyo-e and Western styles of drawing, and took its current form shortly after World War II. Manga, apart from covers, is usually published in black and white but it is common to find introductions to chapters to be in color, and is read from top to bottom and then right to left, similar to the layout of a Japanese plain text. Financially, manga represented in 2005 a market of ¥24 billion in Japan and one of $180 million in the United States.[1] Manga was the fastest growing segment of books in the United States in 2005.

Anime and manga share many characteristics, including: exaggerating (in terms of scale) of physical features, to which the reader presumably should pay most attention (best known being "large eyes"), "dramatically shaped speech bubbles, speed lines and onomatopoeic, exclamatory typography..."[2] Some manga, a small amount of the total output, is adapted into anime, often with the collaboration of the original author. Computer games can also give rise to anime. In such cases, the stories are often compressed and modified to fit the format and appeal to a wider market.[3] Popular anime franchises sometimes include full-length feature films, and some have been adapted into live-action films and television programs.

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Sailor Moon (officially translated as Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon in English) is a Japanese media franchise created by mangaka Naoko Takeuchi. Sailor Moon has redefined the magical-girl genre, as previously, magical girls did not use their powers to fight evil but after this series, this has become one of the standard archetypes of the genre. The popularity of the manga resulted in spinoffs into other types of media, including an anime adaptation, musical theater productions, video games, and a tokusatsu series. Although most concepts in these different media overlap, often notable differences occur, and thus continuity between the different media formats is limited.

The story of the various metaseries in Sailor Moon revolves around the reincarnated defenders of a kingdom that once spanned the solar system, and around the evil forces that they battle. The major characters—the Sailor Senshi (literally "Sailor Soldiers"; frequently called "Sailor Scouts" in many Western versions), teenage girls—can transform into heroines named for the moon and planets (Sailor Moon, Sailor Mercury, Sailor Mars, etc.). The use of "Sailor" comes from a style of girls' school uniform popular in Japan, the sērā fuku ("sailor outfit"), on which Takeuchi modeled the Sailor Senshi's uniforms. The elements of fantasy in the series are heavily symbolic and often based on mythology.

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Pikachu (ピカチュウ) is one of the species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. As do all Pokémon, Pikachu fight other Pokémon in battles central to the anime, manga, and games of the series. Pikachu is among the most recognizable Pokémon, largely because a Pikachu is a central character in the Pokémon anime series. Pikachu is widely considered the most popular Pokémon, is regarded as the official mascot of the Pokémon franchise, and has become an icon of Japanese culture in recent years.

Within the world of the Pokémon franchise, Pikachu are often found in houses, forests,Pokédex: It lives in forests, plains, and occasionally near mountains, islands, and electrical sources (such as power plants), on most continents throughout the fictional world. As an Electric-type Pokémon, Pikachu can store electricity in its cheeks and release it in lightning-based attacks.

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The chapters of the manga series Tokyo Mew Mew were written by Reiko Yoshida and illustrated by Mia Ikumi. The first chapter premiered in the September 2000 issue of Nakayoshi, where it was serialized monthly until its conclusion in the February 2003 issue. The series focuses on five girls infused with the DNA of rare animals that gives them special powers and allows them to transform into "Mew Mews". Led by Ichigo Momomiya, the girls protect the earth from aliens who wish to "reclaim" it. A sequel, Tokyo Mew Mew a la Mode written and illustrated solely by Mia Ikumi, was serialized in Nakayoshi from April 2003 to February 2004. The sequel introduces a new Mew Mew, Berry Shirayuki, who becomes the temporary leader of the Mew Mews while they face a new threat in the form of the Saint Rose Crusaders.

The 27 unnamed chapters were collected and published in seven tankōbon volumes by Kodansha starting on February 1, 2001; the last volume was released on April 4, 2003. The 11 chapters of Tokyo Mew Mew a la Mode were published in two tankōbon volumes on November 6, 2003 and April 6, 2004. Tokyo Mew Mew was adapted into a 52-episode anime series by Studio Pierrot that aired in Japan on TV Aichi and TV Tokyo from April 6, 2002 to March 29, 2003. The manga series is licensed for regional language releases by Pika Édition in France, Japonica Polonica Fantastica in Poland, in Finnish by Sangatsu Manga, and Carlsen Comics in Germany, Denmark, and Sweden.

Selected picture

CLAMP
Credit: John (Phoenix) Brown

The member of the manga artist group CLAMP. Their works includes mangas like Cardcaptor Sakura, Tsubasa: Reservoir Chronicle and Chobits.

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Did you know

  • ... that Firo Prochainezo, a character of the Baccano! light novel and anime series, wears glasses in an attempt to look smarter?

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General

Anime and manga fandom • Anime convention • Anime industry • Cosplay • Dōjinshi • History of anime • History of manga

Demographic groups

Children • Josei • Seinen • Shōnen • Shōjo

Genres

Ecchi • Harem • Magical girl • Mecha • Yaoi • Yuri • Hentai

Lists

Anime companies • Anime conventions • Anime & manga video games • Best-selling manga • Licensed manga • Longest-running anime and manga • Manga magazines

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Manga

Manga on Wikinews     Manga on Wikiquote     Manga on Wikibooks     Manga on Wikisource     Manga on Wiktionary     Manga on Wikimedia Commons
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