Portal:Australian cricket team in England in 1948/Featured account

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Portal:Australian cricket team in England in 1948/Featured account/0
Donald Bradman was the captain, one of three selectors, and overall a dominant figure of the Australian cricket team which toured England in 1948. Generally regarded as the greatest batsman in the history of cricket, the right-handed Bradman played in all five Tests as captain at No. 3. Bradman was more influential than other Australian captains because he was also one of the three selectors who had a hand in choosing the squad. He was also a member of the Australian Board of Control while still playing, a privilege that no other person has held. At the age of 40, Bradman was by far the oldest player on the team; three quarters of his team were at least eight years younger, and some viewed him as a father figure. Coupled with his status as a national hero, cricketing ability and influence as an administrator, this associated the team more closely to him than other teams to their respective captains. Bradman's iconic stature as a cricketer also led to record-breaking public interest and attendances at the matches on tour.

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Lindsay Hassett was the vice-captain and one of three on-tour selectors for Don Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. A right-handed batsman, Hassett played in all five Tests; he was a middle-order batsman in all but the Fourth Test, when he stood in as an opener due to an injury to Sid Barnes. Hassett captained the team in nine tour matches while Bradman was rested. Under Hassett's watch, Australia won seven matches, five of these by an innings, while both draws were rain-affected fixtures in which more than half the playing time was lost. Hassett had two close encounters, both on damp pitches before the First Test. Hassett ended the first-class matches with 1,563 runs at a batting average of 74.22 including seven centuries. Among the Australians, he had the third highest aggregate behind Bradman and Arthur Morris and the second highest average. His highest score was an unbeaten 200 against the Gentlemen of England. Hassett was less successful in the Tests, scoring 310 runs at 44.28 with one century.

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Sid Barnes was a key member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. A right-handed opening batsman, Barnes was part of Bradman's first-choice team and played in four of the five Tests—he missed one match due to injury—partnering the left-handed Arthur Morris. Barnes ended the first-class matches with 1,354 runs at a batting average of 56.41 including three centuries. Barnes found his best form in the Tests, yielding 329 runs at 82.25. He scored half-centuries in both innings of the First Test, before compiling a hard-hitting 141 in the second innings of the Second Test, helping to set up victory in both matches. In the Third Test, Barnes was injured and hospitalised after being hit in the ribs by a Dick Pollard pull shot. After missing the Fourth Test, Barnes returned to score his third half-century for the series as Australia completed a 4–0 win with an innings victory in the Fifth Test. Aside from his run-scoring, Barnes, who was well known for being eccentric, gained fame throughout the season for his fielding at short leg—where he took 19 catches for the season.

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Keith Miller was a key member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team which toured England in 1948. Miller played as a right-arm opening fast bowler and a right-handed middle-order batsman. Along with Ray Lindwall, he formed Australia's first-choice pace duo, a combination regarded as one of the best of all time. Bradman typically used the pair in short and intense bursts against the English batsmen with the new ball. England had agreed to make a new ball available every 55 overs, more often than usual, allowing the pair more frequent use of a shiny ball that swung at high pace. Miller was also a skillful slips fielder, regarded by his captain as the best in the world. Miller took 13 wickets at an average of 26.28 and scored 184 runs in the Tests at an average of 23.15, and played a key role in subduing England's leading batsmen, Len Hutton and Denis Compton, with a barrage of short-pitched bowling.

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Sam Loxton was a member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. A batting all rounder, Loxton played as a right-handed middle-order batsman and a right-arm fast medium bowler who reinforced the frontline pace attack of Ray Lindwall, Keith Miller and Bill Johnston. Starting the tour as a fringe player, Loxton was omitted for the pre-Test fixtures against Worcestershire and the Marylebone Cricket Club, where Australia traditionally fielded their full-strength team. He was overlooked for the first two Tests; reserve opening batsman Bill Brown played out of position in the middle-order. However, Brown struggled in the unfamiliar role, and Loxton scored 159 not out against Gloucestershire to oust the former from his position for the Third Test at Old Trafford. Loxton scored 36 to help Australia avoid the follow on and salvage a draw, before making his most notable contribution in the Fourth Test at Headingley. He took 3/55 in the first innings and scored a counter-attacking 93 on the third day to keep Australia in the game; they went on to win after a world record-breaking run-chase on the final day. Loxton also played in the Fifth Test and ended the series with 144 runs at a batting average of 48.00 and three wickets at a bowling average of 49.33.

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Ray Lindwall was a key member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. Lindwall played as a right-arm opening fast bowler and right-handed batsman in the lower middle-order. Along with Keith Miller, Lindwall formed Australia's first-choice pace duo, regarded as one of the best of all time, and Bradman typically used them in short and sharp bursts against the home batsmen with the new ball. The pair were used to target England's leading batsmen, Len Hutton and Denis Compton during the major matches, and subdued Hutton for much of the summer. England had agreed to make a new ball available after every 55 overs, more often than the usual regulations at the time, thereby allowing the pair more frequent use of a shiny ball that swung at high pace. Bradman gave the duo lighter workloads in the tour matches in order to preserve their energy for the new ball battles against England’s key batsmen in the Tests. Lindwall was a capable lower-order batsman who made two Test centuries during his career, and he featured in several rearguard actions that boosted Australia's scores during the tour.

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Ron Hamence was a member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team of 1948, which toured England. A right-handed middle-order batsman, Hamence was not instrumental in the team's success. Regarded as the last batsman to be chosen for the team, his selection was the subject of controversy because many batsmen who had scored more runs in the preceding Australian season had been overlooked. Hamence and Colin McCool were the only squad members who did not play a Test on tour. Hamence was used in non-Test tour matches so that the leading batsmen could conserve energy for the Tests, as play was scheduled for six days a week. Along with Doug Ring, Hamence and McCool called themselves "ground staff" because of their scant playing duties in the major matches, and they often created and sang ironic songs about their lack of opportunities. Bradman was reluctant to risk the team's unbeaten record and as a result, Hamence did not receive many opportunities to bat high in the order, something that was the subject of criticism. Hamence scored 582 runs at a batting average of 32.33, with a top-score of 99.

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Neil Harvey was a member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. Aged 19, Harvey was the youngest player of the touring party. An attacking left-handed middle-order batsman, he had become the youngest Australian to score a Test century by compiling 153 in the Fifth Test against India in the preceding Australian summer of 1947–48. However, Harvey struggled early on in the tour, having difficulty adapting to English conditions. After being omitted from the first-choice team in the first half of the tour, Harvey's performances improved with his increasing familiarity with local conditions and he was called into the team for the Fourth Test after an injury to Sid Barnes. Harvey scored 112 in a first innings counter-attack to keep Australia in contention after they had suffered a top-order collapse. Harvey hit the winning boundary in the second innings as Australia won the match with a Test world record successful run-chase of 3/404. He retained his place for the Fifth Test, ending the series with 133 runs at a batting average of 66.50. Overall, Harvey ended with 1,129 runs at 53.76 in the first-class matches with four centuries.

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