Portal:Bible

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Bible Portal

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The Bible is the name of the Jewish and Christian Holy Book. The term carries various meanings, depending on the religious context in which it is used. For Jews, the term "Bible" refers to the Tanakh (Heb., תָּנָ״ךְ), an acronym formed from the Hebrew names of the three divisions of the Jewish Scriptures: Law (Torah), Prophets (Nevi'im), and Writings (Ketuvim). To Christians, the term incorporates both the Tanakh, or "Old Testament," and the New Testament. Not all Christians have the same number of books in the Bible, i.e Roman Catholics have 73 books to the Bible, while Protestants have 66. The 7 extra books are usually referred to by the Roman Catholic Church as "Deuterocanonicals" since they were added in a second phase to the original Bible Canon.

Opinions vary as to the historical truth contained within the pages of the Bible. Conservative Christians tend to view the Bible as it is described by Paul in 2 Timothy 3:16, namely that "all Scripture is given by God's inspiration" (Gr., θεόπνευστος, literally "God-breathed"). Thus, in their evaluation, the original text of the Bible was literally given by the inspiration of God. Although they do not accept Paul's writing, Orthodox Jews assent to the view that the Tanakh (especially the Torah) was given by God's inspiration. Among religious liberals, this is subject to criticism. While most liberal theologians view the Bible as a book of inspired history, others view it as a record from ancient history that reflects the specific perspectives of those who recorded a religious story. The continuum of beliefs regarding the Bible's texts covers the entire range of human experience, from full faith and trust to disbelief and criticism.

The text has been translated into more than 2,100 languages, and with more than five billion copies sold since 1815, it is the best-selling book of all-time.

Selected article

The New England Psalter was an early reading textbook for children which was first published in the late 17th century. It was preceded by the hornbook and the primer as early reading texts and by a variety of psalters which were used in religious services. The contents of the New England Psalter included: the Psalms, some of the stories of the Old and New Testament, rules for reading, lessons in spelling, instructions for printing letters, reading verse and the use of capitals. It is significant that during this period of time the laws of England forbade the printing of Bibles outside of Britain. It was considered legal to print the Psalms in America. Once children had completed the lessons in the New England Psalter they proceeded to the Bible, the catechism and the spelling book.

Did you know...

...that The Sheep and the Goats or "The Judgment of the Nations" was a discourse of Jesus recorded in the New Testament.

...that the Northern Kingdom of Israel is sometimes referred to as Ephraim, which was the dominant tribe, and that the Southern Kingdom of Judah included Jerusalem.

...that the number of gold talents that King Solomon collected in a single year was 666. 1 Kings 10:14, 2 Chronicles 9:13

...that the word Christian only appears three times in the Bible, while the musical term selah appears 74 times in the Bible (NASB)

...that Methuselah died in the year of the Flood. Genesis 5

...that Ezekiel saw a creature like a wheel and full of eyes. Ezekiel 1

...that the word hilasterion, which is translated as mercy seat in Hebrews (9:5), is also used to describe Jesus. Romans 3:25

...that Christians believe the Second Coming of Jesus is predicted in biblical messianic prophecies.

...that Finding Faith in Christ is a Bible film produced by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Quotations

1 Take heed that ye do not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise ye have no reward of your Father which is in heaven.

2 Therefore when thou doest thine alms, do not sound a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.

3 But when thou doest alms, let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth:

4 That thine alms may be in secret: and thy Father which seeth in secret himself shall reward thee openly.

5 And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.

6 But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.

7 But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking.

8 Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him.

9 After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.

10 Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Read More

From Matthew 6, the Sermon on the Mount. LDS edition of the Bible

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