Portal:Buenos Aires

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Buenos Aires

Flag of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
Coat of Arms of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
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Buenos Aires is the capital and largest city of Argentina, and the second-largest metropolitan area in South America, after Greater São Paulo. It is located on the western shore of the estuary of the Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of the South American continent. Greater Buenos Aires conurbation, which also includes several Buenos Aires Province districts, constitutes the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around thirteen million. It is located on the western shore of the estuary of the Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of the South American continent. Greater Buenos Aires conurbation, which also includes several Buenos Aires Province districts, constitutes the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around thirteen million. People from Buenos Aires are referred to as porteños (people of the port). Buenos Aires is a top tourist destination, and is known for its European style architecture and rich cultural life, with the highest concentration of theatres in the world.
Obelisco de Buenos Aires.jpg More about… the City of Buenos Aires
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Pirámide de Mayo
The Pirámide de Mayo (Spanish pronunciation: [piˈɾamiðe ðe ˈmaʝo], May Pyramid), located at the hub of the Plaza de Mayo, is the oldest national monument in the City of Buenos Aires. Its construction was ordered in 1811 by the Primera Junta to celebrate the first anniversary of the May Revolution. It was renovated in 1856, under the direction of Prilidiano Pueyrredón. In 1912, after having undergone many modifications, it was moved 63 metres (68.9 yards) to the east, with the idea that a much larger monument would eventually be constructed around it.

The monument is crowned by an allegory of Liberty, the work of the French sculptor Joseph Dubourdieu. From the ground to the peak of the statue's Phrygian cap, the Pyramid measures 18.76 metres (61.5 feet).

In 1906, with a few years until the centenary of the May Revolution, plans were put forward for the relocation to the center of the Plaza de Mayo. This was not realized until 1912. After the marble statues had been removed, the Pyramid was enclosed with wood for protection. Two rails were laid, four metres apart, supported by masonry pillars that could support a weight of 225 metric tons. Under the Pyramid was a cement platform resting on solid wheels. Between the 12th and 20 November, the Pyramid was pulled 63.17 metres with a winch. A metal time capsule containing information about the relocation was buried under the Pyramid's new foundation.

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The Obelisk in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires
Credit: Kyle Lease

Located in the Plaza de la República, in the intersection of avenues Corrientes and 9 de Julio, the Obelisk of Buenos Aires is a national historic monument and icon of Buenos Aires. It was built to commemorate the fourth centenary of the first foundation of the city. Where the Obelisco stands, the Argentine flag was officially hoisted for the first time in the city, 1812.

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1859 1p "In Ps" tete-beche pair of stamps issues by the State of Buenos Aires

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Emblem
San Telmo ("Saint Pedro González Telmo") is the oldest barrio (neighborhood) of Buenos Aires, Argentina. It is a well-preserved area of the Argentine metropolis and is characterized by its colonial buildings. Cafes, tango parlors and antique shops line the cobblestone streets, which are often filled with artists and dancers.

San Telmo's attractions include old churches (e.g. San Pedro Telmo), museums, antique stores and a semi-permanent antique fair (Feria de Antigüedades) in the main public square, Plaza Dorrego. Tango-related activities for both locals and tourists are in the area.

San Telmo's bohemian air began attracting local artists after upwardly mobile immigrants left the area. Growing cultural activity resulted in the opening of the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art by critic Rafael Squirru in 1956, as well as in the 1960 advent of the "Republic of San Telmo," an artisan guild which organized art walks and other events. As most of San Telmo's 19th century architecture and cobblestone streets remain, it has also become an important tourist attraction.

Administrative divisions:

  1. Puerto Madero, San Nicolás, Retiro, Monserrat, San Telmo, and Constitución
  2. Recoleta
  3. Balvanera and San Cristóbal
  4. La Boca, Barracas, Parque Patricios, and Nueva Pompeya
  5. Almagro and Boedo
  6. Caballito
  7. Flores and Parque Chacabuco
  8. Villa Soldati, Villa Lugano, and Villa Riachuelo
  9. Parque Avellaneda, Mataderos, and Liniers
  10. Villa Luro, Vélez Sársfield, Floresta, Monte Castro, Villa Real, and Versalles
  11. Villa Devoto, Villa del Parque, Villa Santa Rita, and Villa General Mitre
  12. Villa Pueyrredón, Villa Urquiza, Coghlan, and Saavedra
  13. Núñez, Belgrano, and Colegiales
  14. Palermo
  15. Villa Ortúzar, Chacarita, Villa Crespo, La Paternal, Agronomía and Parque Chas
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