Portal:Catholicism/Patron Archive/June

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June 1 [edit]

Justin Martyr

Saint Justin Martyr (also Justin the Martyr, Justin of Caesarea, Justin the Philosopher, Latin Iustinus Martys) (100165) was an early Christian apologist and saint. His works represent the earliest surviving Christian apologies of notable size.Most of what is known about the life of Justin Martyr comes from his own writings. He was born at Flavia Neapolis (Biblical Shechem, now modern-day Nablus). According to church tradition Justin suffered martyrdom at Rome under the Emperor Marcus Aurelius when Rusticus was prefect of the city (between 162 and 168). He called himself a Samaritan, but his father and grandfather were probably Greek or Roman, and he was brought up a Pagan. It seems that St Justin had property, studied philosophy, converted to Christianity, and devoted the rest of his life to teaching what he considered the true philosophy, still wearing his philosopher's gown to indicate that he had attained the truth. He probably travelled widely and ultimately settled in Rome as a Christian teacher.
Attributes:Philosopher's coat, palm tree
Patronage:Philosophers
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June 2[edit]

The Martyrdom of Saint Erasmus

Saint Erasmus of Formiae is a Christian saint and martyr who died ca. 303, also known as Saint Elmo. He is venerated as the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus or Elmo is also one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, saintly figures of Christian legend who were venerated especially in Central Europe as intercessors.The Acts of Saint Elmo were partly compiled from legends that confuse him with a Syrian bishop Erasmus of Antioch. Jacobus de Voragine in the Golden Legend credited him as a bishop at Formia over all the Italian Campania, as a hermit on Mount Lebanon, and a martyr in the persecutions under Eastern Roman Emperor Diocletian.According to his legend, when the persecutions of Diocletian began, Erasmus was called before a judge, beaten around the head, spat upon and "besprinkled [...] with foulness". He was then beaten with leaden mauls until his veins broke and burst. Erasmus suffered all of these punishments with tremendous willingness. Erasmus was then thrown into a pit of snakes and worms, and boiling oil and sulfur were poured on him but "he lay therein as he had lain in cold water, thanking and loving God". Then thunder and lightning came and electrocuted everyone around save Erasmus. Thus the saint was protected from the lightning. Diocletian had him thrown in another pit, but an angel came and slew all the vipers and worms.


Attributes:represented by a windlass
Patronage:sailors, Gaeta, Formia, colic in children, intestinal ailments and diseases, cramps and the pain of women in labor, cattle pest, Fort St. Elmo, (Malta)
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June 3 [edit]

Carl Lwanga and his companions

Carl Lwanga (or Charles Lwanga) (1865–June 3, 1886) was a Ugandan Catholic catechist martyred for his faith and revered as a saint in the Catholic Church. He was born in the kingdom of Buganda in the southern part of modern Uganda, and served as a page in the court of King Mwanga II.King Mwanga began to insist Christian converts abandon their new faith, and executed many Catholics between 1885 and 1887; many of them were officials in the court of the king or otherwise very close to him, including Lwanga. After a massacre of Anglicans in 1885 the court's resident Catholic priest, Joseph Mukasa, reproached the king for the deed. Mwanga had Mukasa beheaded and arrested all of his followers. Lwanga took up Mukasa's duties, and secretly baptized those of his pupils who had only been catechumens. Carl Lwanga and 21 other Catholics were burnt alive on June 3, 1886.
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Patronage:African Catholic Youth Action, converts, torture victims
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June 4[edit]

Saint Francis Caracciolo

Saint Francis Caracciolo (October 13, 1563–June 4, 1608) born Ascanio Pisquizio, was an Italian Catholic priest who co-founded the Congregation of the Minor Clerks Regular with John Augustine Adorno.He decided to adopt a religious life after recovering from leprosy at the age of 22.He was born in Villa Santa Maria in Abruzzi, Italy; he belonged to the Pisquizio branch of the Caracciolo and received in baptism the name of Ascanio. From his infancy, he had a reputation for gentleness and uprightness. He vowed himself to an ecclesiastical life, and distributing his goods to the poor, went to Naples in 1585 to study theology. In 1587 he was ordained priest and joined the confraternity of the Bianchi della Giustizia (The White Robes of Justice), whose object was to assist condemned criminals to die holy deaths.
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Patronage:patron saint of Naples and Italian cooks
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June 5[edit]

Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints

Saint Boniface (Latin: Bonifacius; German: Bonifatius; c. 672 – June 5, 754), the Apostle of the Germans, born Winfrid or Wynfrith at Crediton in the kingdom of Wessex (now in Devon, England), was a missionary who propagated Christianity in the Frankish Empire during the 8th century. He was killed in Frisia in 754.Born at Crediton, Devon, Winfrid was of a respected and prosperous family. He devoted himself at an early age to the monastic life. Winfrid taught in the abbey school and at the age of 30 became a priest. He wrote the first Latin grammar produced in England.In 716, Winfrid set out on a missionary expedition to Frisia, intending to convert the inhabitants. This mission failed. Winfrid again set out in 718, visited Rome, and was commissioned in 719 by Pope Gregory II, who gave him his new name of Boniface. He set out to evangelize in Germany and reorganize the church there. On November 30, 722, he was elevated to bishop of the Germanic territories he would bring into the fold of the Roman Church.
Attributes: ax, book; fountain; fox; oak; raven; scourge; sword
Patronage: brewers; file cutters; Fulda; The Netherlands and Germany; tailors; World Youth Day
Prayer: In her voyage across the ocean of this world, the Church is like a great ship being pounded by the waves of life's different stresses. Our duty is not to abandon ship but to keep her on her course. Let us stand fast in what is right, and prepare our souls for trial. Let us wait upon God's strengthening aid and say to him: "O Lord, you have been our refuge in all generations." Let us trust in him who has placed this burden upon us. What we ourselves cannot bear let us bear with the help of Christ. For he is all-powerful, and he tells us: "My yoke is easy, and my burden light." Let us continue the fight on the day of the Lord. The days of anguish and of tribulation have overtaken us; if God so wills, "let us die for the holy laws of our fathers," so that we may deserve to obtain an eternal inheritance with them.


June 6[edit]

Saint Norbert of Xanten

Saint Norbert of Xanten (c. 1080–6 June 1134) was a Christian saint and founder of the Norbertines or Premonstratensian order of canons.Norbert was born at Gennep on the Maas but grew up and was educated in Xanten on the left bank of the Rhine, near Wesel. His father, Heribert, Count of Gennep, was related to the imperial house of Germany and the house of Lorraine. Ordained as subdeacon, Norbert was appointed to a canonry at Xanten. Soon after, he was summoned to the court of Frederick of Cologne and later to that of Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor, whose almoner he became.In 1115, Norbert founded the Abbey of Fürstenberg [disambiguation needed], endowed it with a portion of his property and made it over to Cono of Siegburg and his Benedictine successors. He was ordained priest soon afterward and preached in France and Belgium.
Attributes:Habit of a Norbertine, monstrance, devil at his feet
Patronage:Bohemia; diocese of Magdeburg, Germany; peace
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June 7 [edit]

St. Robert of Newminster (11001159) was a priest, abbot, and is a canonized saint of the Roman Catholic Church.St. Robert was born in the district of Craven, near Skipton in North Yorkshire, probably in the village of Gargrave. He studied at the University of Paris, where he is said to have composed a commentary - since lost - on the Psalms. He became a parish priest, returning to serve in his hometown of Gargrave, where he was made rector. He later became a Benedictine at Whitby, joining a band of monks from Saint Mary's Abbey in York. They established a monastery in the winter of 1132 in a valley near Skeldale, on land given them by Archbishop Thurston. The first two years were difficult, and the monks struggled in extreme poverty. Initially they lived in a makeshift structure on the banks of the River Skell. But despite the hardships, the monks were known for their holiness, austerity, and dedication to the strict Benedictine way of life.
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June 8 [edit]

Statue of Saint Medardus, Saint Médard d'Eyrans

Saint Medardus (French: Médard; c. 470 - c. 545) was the bishop of Vermandois who removed the seat of the diocese to Noyon. Medardus was born at Salency (Oise), in Picardy. His father, Nectaridus, was of Frankish origin, while his mother Protagia was Gallo-Roman. The Roman Martyrology includes the fanciful tale that Saint Gildardus, Bishop of Rouen, was his brother, "born on the same day, consecrated bishops on the same day, and on the same day withdrawn from this life". A pious fiction links his childhood to his future bishoprics: "He often accompanied his father on business to Vermand and Tournai, where he frequented the schools, carefully avoiding all worldly dissipation". At the death of Bishop Alomer, when Medard was 33, he was chosen to succeed him as bishop of Vermand due to his exemplary piety and his knowledge, considerable for that time. Despite his objections, he found himself obliged to accept the heavy responsibilities of the position, to which he devoted himself zealously. Evidence for his deeds as bishop is thin. He is held to have removed the see from Vermand, a little city with no defences, to Noyon, the strongest place in that region. The year is traditionally given as 531, the year in which Clotaire marched against the Thuringii with his brother Theuderic I, but struggles with the Burgundians also troubled Frankish Neustria. He was a councillor to Clotaire, the Merovingian king at Soissons.
Attributes: Episcopal garments
Patronage: the weather; invoked against toothache
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June 9 [edit]

Saint Columba, Apostle of the Picts

Saint Columba (7 December 521 – 9 June 597), sometimes referred to as Columba of Iona, or, in Old Irish, as Colm Cille or Columcille (meaning "Dove of the church") was an outstanding figure among the Gaelic missionary monks who, some of his advocates claim, introduced Christianity to the Kingdom of the Picts during the Early Medieval Period. He was one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland. Columba was born to Fedlimid and Eithne of the Uí Néill house in Gartan, near Lough Gartan, County Donegal, in Ireland. On his father's side he was great-great-grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, an Irish high king of the 5th century. In early Christian Ireland the druidic tradition collapsed, with the spread of the new Christian faith. The study of Latin learning and Christian theology in monasteries flourished. Columba became a pupil at the monastic school at Clonard Abbey, situated on the River Boyne in modern County Meath.
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Patronage: floods, bookbinders, poets, Ireland, Scotland
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June 10 [edit]


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June 11 [edit]


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June 12 [edit]

Saint John of Sahagún also known as Saint John of San Facondo (1419 - June 11, 1479) was a celebrated Spanish preacher who belonged to Order of Hermits of St. Augustine.Saint John was born in the year 1419, at Sahagún (or San Facondo) in the Province of Leon, in the Kingdom of Castile. He was the oldest of seven children of John Gonzalez de Castrillo and Sancia Martinez, both pious and respected parents.John received his early education from the Benedictines of his native city. After receiving ecclesiastical tonsure, according to the custom of the times, his father procured for him the benefice of the neighboring parish of Dornillos. He was later introduced to Monsignor Alfonso de Cartagena, Bishop of Burgos (1435-1456), who took a fancy to the bright, high-spirited boy. Bishop de Cartagena had him educated at his own residence, gave him several prebends, ordained him a priest in the year 1445, and made him a canon at the Cathedral of Burgos. All of this caused John many qualms of conscience.Moved by Divine grace and out of respect for the laws of the Church, John resigned all and retained only the chaplaincy of St Agatha, where he said Mass, preached and catechized the ignorant. He now began to lead a life of strict poverty and mortification.
Attributes:Confessor; holding a Chalice and the Holy Host surrounded by rays of light
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June 13 [edit]

Anthony of Padua

Saint Anthony of Padua (ca. 1195 – June 13, 1231) also venerated as Saint Anthony of Lisbon and Saint Anthony of Padua, is a Catholic saint who was born in Lisbon, Portugal, as Fernando Martins de Bulhão to a wealthy family and who died in Padua, Italy.Anthony was born to Martim Vicente de Bulhão and wife Teresa Pais Taveira in a very rich family who wanted him to become a noble; however these were not his wishes. His family arranged sound education for him at the local cathedral school. Against the wishes of his family, Anthony entered the Augustinian Abbey of St. Vincent on the outskirts of Lisbon. The Canons Regular of St Augustine, of which he was now a member, were famous for their dedication to scholarly pursuits. Anthony studied Scripture and the Latin classics. Anthony was constantly visited by friends and relatives, bringing embarrassing gifts and news from their social world which disturbed him. His studies were suffering and there he found no peace. He persuaded his superiors to transfer him to the Augustinian Santa Cruz Monastery (Abbey of the Holy Cross) in Coimbra, then the capital of Portugal, and continued his studies.
Attributes:book; bread; Infant Jesus; lily
Patronage:animals; barrenness; Brazil; Beaumont, Texas; elderly people; faith in the Blessed Sacrament; Ferrazzano, Italy; fishermen; Franciscan Custody of the Holy Land; harvests; horses; Lisbon; lost articles; lower animals; mail; mariners; American Indians; Masbate, Philippines; Cavite, Philippines; Sibulan, Negros Oriental, Philippines; oppressed people; Padua, Italy; poor people; Portugal; pregnant women; sailors; seekers of lost articles; shipwrecks; starvation; sterility; swineherds; Tigua Indians; travel hostesses; travellers; watermen
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June 14 [edit]

Russian icon of St. Eliseus, 18th century (Iconostasis of Kizhi

Elisha (Hebrew: אֱלִישַׁע, Modern Elišaʿ, Tiberian ʾĔlîšaʿ ; "My God is salvation", Greek: Ελισσαίος, Elisaios) is a Biblical prophet. In Greek and Latin, (and in English to many Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox) he is known as Saint Eliseus; however, the standard English form of the name has been "Elisha," at least since the introduction of the King James Version of the Bible. He is also a prophet in Islam under the name Al-Yasa.Elisha was the son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah; he became the attendant and disciple of Elijah (1 Kings 19:16-19), and Horeb, that Elisha, the son of Shaphat, had been selected by God as his successor in the prophetic office, Elijah set out to make known the Divine will. On his way from Sinai to Damascus, Elijah found Elisha "one of them that were ploughing with twelve yoke of oxen". Elisha delayed only long enough to kill the yoke of oxen, whose flesh he boiled with the very wood of his plough. He went over to him, threw his mantle over Elisha's shoulders, and at once adopted him as a son, investing him with the prophetic office (compare Luke 9:61-62). Elisha accepted this call about four years before the death of Israel's King Ahab. For the next seven or eight years Elisha became Elijah's close attendant until Elijah was taken up into heaven. During all these years we hear nothing of Elisha except in connection with the closing scenes of Elijah's life.


Attributes: Clothed as a prophet, often holding a scroll
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June 15[edit]

Saint Vitus, from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493

Vitus was a Christian saint from Sicily. He died as a martyr during the persecution of Christians by co-ruling Roman emperors Diocletian and Maximian in 303.

He is counted as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers of the Catholic Church. Saint Vitus' Day is celebrated on June 15. In places where the Julian calendar is used, this date coincides, in the 20th and 21st centuries, with the Gregorian calendar 28 June. The popularity of Saint Vitus is shown by the variants of his name existing in many European languages. They include Guy (French), Vito (Italian), Guido (Italian), Vid (Croatian and South-Slav languages), Vith, Vít (Czech), Veit (German), Wit (Polish). In the late Middle Ages, people in Germany and countries such as Latvia celebrated the feast of Saint Vitus by dancing before his statue. This dancing became something of a mania and gave the name of "Saint Vitus Dance" to the nervous disorder called chorea. It also led to Saint Vitus being considered the patron saint of dancers and entertainers in general.
Attributes: depicted in a cauldron, with a rooster or a lion
Patronage: actors; comedians; Czechoslovakia; dancers; dogs; epilepsy; Mazara del Vallo, Sicily; Forio, Ischia; oversleeping; Prague; rheumatic chorea (Saint Vitus Dance); snake bites; storms; Vacha, Germany; Zeven, Lower Saxony; E Clampus Vitus


June 16 [edit]


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June 17[edit]

Botolph, Botulph or Botulf (d. c. 680) was an English abbot and saint. He is the patron saint of travellers and the various aspects of farming. His feast day is celebrated either on 17 June (in England) or 25 June (in Scotland), and his translation on 1 December.Little is known about his life, other than doubtful details in a surviving account written four hundred years after his death by the eleventh-century monk Folcard. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records for the year 6531: The Middle Angles, under earldorman Penda, received the true faith. King Anna was killed and Botulf began to build the church at Ikanho.There is no modern town named Icanho (which means 'ox-island' or more strictly, 'ox hill', as in Plymouth Hoe) and the location is disputed; it may be in southern Lincolnshire, where some of the newly Christianized Middle Angles lived, but is most likely to have been by the estuary of the Alde in Suffolk, where a church remains on top of an isolated hill in the parish of Iken; just the place for an early monastery.
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Patronage: travellers and farming


June 18 [edit]

She was born of an obscure family, entered the double monastery of Schönau in Nassau at the age of twelve, received the Benedictine habit, made her profession in 1147, and in 1157 was superioress of the nuns under the Abbot Hildelin. After her death she was buried in the abbey church of St. Florin. When her writings were published the name of saint was added. She was never canonized, but in 1584 her name was entered in the Roman Martyrology and has remained there (Feast 18 June).Given to works of piety from her youth, much afflicted with bodily and mental suffering, a zealous observer of the Rule of St. Benedict and of the regulation of her convent, and devoted to practices of mortification, Elizabeth was favoured, from 1152, with ecstasies and visions of various kinds. These generally occurred on Sundays and Holy Days at Mass or Divine Office or after hearing or reading the lives of saints. Christ, His Blessed Mother, an angel, or the special saint of the day would appear to her and instruct her; or she would see quite realistic representations of the Passion, Resurrection, and Ascension, or other scenes of the Old and New Testaments.
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June 19 [edit]

Romuald

Saint Romuald (c. 951– traditionally 19 June, c. 1025/27) was the founder of the Camaldolese order and a major figure in the eleventh-century "renaissance of eremitical aesceticism".According to the vita by Peter Damian, written about fifteen years after Romuald's death, Romuald was born in Ravenna to the aristocratic Onesti family. As a youth, according to early accounts, Romuald indulged in the pleasures and sins of the world common to a tenth-century nobleman. After watching his father, Sergius, kill an opponent in a duel, however, the 20-year old Romuald was devastated, and fled to the Abbey of Sant'Apollinare in Classe. After some indecision, Romuald became a monk there. Led by a desire for a stricter way of life than he found in that community, three years later he withdrew to become a hermit on a remote island in the region, accompanied solely by an older monk, Marinus.Apparently having gained a reputation for holiness, the Doge Pietro Orseolo of Venice accepted his advice to become a monk, abdicating his office, and fleeing in the night to Catalonia to take the monastic habit. Romuald and his companion, Marinus, accompanied him there, establishing a hermitage near the Abbey of Sant Miguel de Cuxa which Orseolo entered.


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June 20 [edit]

Pope Saint Silverius was Pope from June 8, 536 until March 537).He was a legitimate son of Pope Hormisdas, born before his father entered the priesthood. He was probably consecrated on June 8, 536.He opposed the restoration of the monophysite heretic, former patriarch of Constantinople Anthimus, whom Agapetus had deposed, and thus brought upon himself the hatred of Empress Theodora. Theodora then sought to have Vigilius made pope. During Silverius' papacy, it was alleged that he had purchased his elevation to the see of St. Peter from King Theodahad. On December 9, 536, the Byzantine general Belisarius entered Rome, with the approval of Pope Silverius. Theodahad's successor, Witiges, gathered together an army and besieged Rome for several months, subjecting the city to privation and starvation. It was alleged that Pope Silverius wrote to Witiges offering to betray the city.
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June 21 [edit]

Aloysius Gonzaga

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga (Italian: Luigi Gonzaga, Portuguese and Spanish: Luís de Gonzaga, March 9, 1568–June 21, 1591) was an Italian Jesuit and Saint.Luigi Gonzaga was born at his family’s castle in Castiglione delle Stiviere, between Brescia and Mantova in northern Italy. He was a member of the illustrious House of Gonzaga. He was the oldest son of the Ferdinando Gonzaga (1544–1586), Marquis of Castiglione, and Marta Tana di Santena, daughter of a baron of the Piedmontese Della Rovere family. His father assumed that he would become a soldier, as the family was constantly involved in the frequent minor wars in the area. His military training started at an early age, but he also received an education in languages and other subjects. In 1577, at age 8, he was sent to Florence with his younger brother Ridolfo, to serve at the court of Grand Duke Francesco I de' Medici and to receive further education. While there, he fell ill with a disease of the kidneys, which was to trouble him throughout his life.


Attributes: Soldier with a very tall cross and a sword; decapitated, with his head in a holly bush and the eyes of his executioner dropping out
Patronage: converts, refugees, torture victims


June 22 [edit]

Saint Alban

Saint Alban was the first British Christian martyr. Along with his fellow saints Julius and Aaron, Alban is one of three martyrs remembered from Roman Britain. Alban is listed in the Church of England calendar for 22 June and he continues to be venerated in the Anglican, Catholic, and Orthodox Communions. St Alban is mentioned in "Acta Martyrum", and also by Constantius of Lyon in his Life of St Germanus of Auxerre, written about 480. He also appears in Gildas's 6th century polemic De Excidio Britanniae. In 2006 some Church of England clergy whisperred to each other, and swiftly decided to knock on the door of a nearby priest named Namidus. Namidus then dismissed them into the night, suggesting that Alban should replace St George as the patron saint of England.According to Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People, I.vii and xviii, Alban was a pagan living at Verulamium (now St Albans), who converted to Christianity, and was executed by decapitation on a hill above the Roman settlement of Verulamium. St Albans Abbey was later founded near this site.


Attributes: Soldier with a very tall cross and a sword; decapitated, with his head in a holly bush and the eyes of his executioner dropping out
Patronage: converts, refugees, torture victims


June 23 [edit]

Æthelthryth, or Æðelþryð, (c. 636-23 June 679) is the proper name for the popular Anglo-Saxon saint almost universally known as Etheldreda or by the pet form of Audrey (or variations). She was an East Anglian princess, a Fenland queen and Abbess of Ely in the English county of Cambridgeshire. Æthelthryth was probably born at Exning, near Newmarket in Suffolk. She was one of four daughters of King Anna of East Anglia (kd. 654), all of whom eventually retired from the world and founded abbeys. Æthelthryth made an early first marriage (c. 652) to Tondberct, chief of the South Gyrvians, or "fenmen" (gyr, Old English "fen") (d. 655). However, she managed to persuade her husband to respect a vow of perpetual virginity she had made before her marriage. Upon his death in 655, Æthelthryth retired to the Isle of Ely, given to her as her "morning gift" by Tondberct.
Attributes: Abbess holding a model of Ely Cathedral
Patronage: Throat complaints


June 24 [edit]


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June 25 [edit]

The Virgin Mary with the Baby Jesus, Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, and Saint Prosper

Saint Prosper of Reggio (Italian: San Prospero) (d. June 25, ca. 466) is an Italian saint. Tradition holds that he was a bishop of Reggio Emilia for twenty-two years. Little is known of his life, but documents attest that he was indeed bishop of Reggio Emilia in the fifth century. Remembered for his sense of charity, he is the patron saint of Reggio Emilia, although its cathedral is not dedicated to him. Instead, the church of San Prospero, which Prosper himself had built and dedicated to Saint Apollinaris, commemorates his episcopate. He died at Reggio Emilia. His cult was ancient and was diffused during the eleventh to fourteenth centuries. Prosper was venerated in Parma, Bologna, Lucca, and other cities beyond Reggio. Some thirty-one churches and chapels were dedicated to him in the Middle Ages. However, after the Council of Trent, his cult once again was confined only to Reggio. The Reggio diocese celebrates his cult locally on November 24, but June 25 is his feast day on general calendars.


Attributes: Book; model of Reggio Emilia; episcopal dress
Patronage: Reggio Emilia


June 26 [edit]

Saint Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer (Thursday, January 9, 1902 – Thursday, June 26, 1975) (also known as José María or Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer y Albás, born José María Mariano Escrivá y Albás) was a Spanish Catholic priest and founder of the Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei, popularly, Opus Dei. He was canonized in a controversial process by Pope John Paul II, who declared Saint Josemaría as "counted among the great witnesses of Christianity." He had a doctorate in civil law at the University of Madrid and a doctorate in theology at the Lateran University in Rome. He was a member of the Pontifical Academy of Theology and Consultor of the Congregation of Seminaries, and Consultor of the Pontificial Commission for the Authentic Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law. His principal work was the foundation, government and expansion of Opus Dei. He and the organization have been accused of many things, including political involvement. CNN Vatican analyst John Allen Jr., however, says that these accusations are mere myths that grew from black legends propagated against Opus Dei and Escrivá.
Attributes: Celebration of the Holy Sacrifice of the Altar
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June 27 [edit]


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June 28 [edit]

An engraving of Irenaeus, bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul

Saint Irenaeus (Greek: Ειρηναίος), (b. 2nd century; d. c 200) was bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul, now Lyons, France. He was an early church father and apologist, and his writings were formative in the early development of Christian theology. He was a disciple of Polycarp of Smyrna, who was said to be a disciple of John the Evangelist. Irenaeus's best-known book, Against Heresies, (c 180) is a detailed attack on Gnosticism, which was then a serious threat to the Church, and especially on the system of Valentinus. As the first great Catholic theologian, he emphasized the traditional elements in the Church, especially the episcopate, Scripture, and tradition. Irenaeus wrote that the only way for Christians to retain unity was to humbly accept one doctrinal authority--episcopal councils. Against the Gnostics, who said that they possessed a secret oral tradition from Jesus himself, Irenaeus maintained that the bishops in different cities are known as far back as the Apostles — and none of them was a Gnostic — and that the bishops provided the only safe guide to the interpretation of Scripture. Irenaeus is the earliest witness to recognition of the canonical character of all four gospels.Irenaeus is recognized as a saint by both the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church. His feast day is 28 June.Born in the first half of the 2nd century (the exact date is disputed: between the years 115 and 125 according to some, or 130 and 142 according to others), Irenaeus is thought to have been a Greek from Polycarp's hometown of Smyrna in Asia Minor, now İzmir, Turkey. Unlike many of his contemporary Christians, he was raised in a Christian family rather than converting as an adult.


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June 29 [edit]


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June 30 [edit]


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