Portal:Cincinnati

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Cincinnati is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Hamilton County. The municipality is located in southwestern Ohio and is situated on the Ohio River at the Ohio-Kentucky border. With a 2006 population of 332,252, Cincinnati is Ohio's third largest city, behind Columbus and Cleveland, and the 56th largest city in the United States. The much larger metropolitan area which has a population of over 2 million is the largest metropolitan region in Ohio (20th in the United States) Residents of Cincinnati are called Cincinnatians.

Cincinnati is considered to have been the first major American boomtown rapidly expanding in the heart of the country in the early nineteenth century to rival the larger coastal cities in size and wealth. As the first major inland city in the country, it is sometimes thought of as the first purely American city, lacking the heavy European influence that was present on the east coast. However, by the end of the century, Cincinnati's growth had slowed considerably, and the city was surpassed in population by many other inland cities.

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Norwood is the second most populous city in Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. The city is an enclave of the larger city of Cincinnati. The population was 21,675 at the 2000 census. Originally settled as an early suburb of Cincinnati in the wooded countryside north of the city, the area is characterized by stately older homes and tree lined streets. Norwood is currently undergoing an economic revitalization thanks to recent retail and business development.

The area now known as Norwood was settled in the early 1800's as a coach stop along the Montgomery Road turnpike near the present day intersection of Smith Road. The village was originally named Sharpsburg after an early settler named John Sharpe. It was informally referred to as "Northwood" due to its location north of Cincinnati and being heavily wooded countryside. Much of the area was horse farms or fruit and vegetable orchards. The Marietta & Cincinnati; Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern; and Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern railroads were built through the area, leading to increasing settlement in the countryside.

Norwood is known as the "Gem of the Highlands". Traditionally, the nickname "Gem of the Highlands" has been more of a public relations moniker for the city and is not commonly used by residents in casual conversation. Newer nicknames such as "The Wood" and "N-Wood" have emerged and are more commonly used by locals in day-to-day discourse.

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Photo credit: Joe Steinsky
Paul Brown Stadium is the home of the Cincinnati Bengals.

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The Cincinnati Masters is an annual tennis event held in the Cincinnati suburb of Mason, Ohio, USA. The event started on September 18, 1899 and is today the oldest tennis tournament in the United States played in its original city.

The men's event is one of nine ATP Masters Series tournaments on the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) tour. The women's event is the only Sony Ericsson WTA Tour event held in the American Midwest. Currently it is a Tier III event on the WTA Tour. The men's and women's events are currently played in separate weeks during the July-August period. The competition is played on outdoor hardcourts. Because of its sponsorship by the Western & Southern Financial Group, the official names of the men's and women's tournament are the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters and the Western & Southern Financial Group Women's Open.

The tournament is played at the Lindner Family Tennis Center, located at 5460 Courseview Drive in Mason, Ohio. It features three tennis stadiums, and is the only venue outside of the Grand Slams with more than two permanent stadiums. Center Court, first built in 1981 and expanded over the years, has a capacity of 10,500. Grandstand Court (Stadium 2), built in 1995, has a capacity of 5,000. Court #3 (Stadium 3), built in 1997, has a capacity of 2,000. The venue has a total of 10 courts.

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Kings Island is a 364 acre amusement park located in the city of Mason, in Warren County, Ohio. The park is located 24 miles northeast of Cincinnati. The park owns close to 775 acres of land, but only 364 acres (1.5 km²) are currently developed. Kings Island is owned by Cedar Fair Entertainment Co., and was part of the former Paramount Parks chain that Cedar Fair acquired from CBS Corporation on June 30, 2006.

Kings Island first opened its gates in 1972 in what was then Deerfield Township, developed by the Taft Broadcasting Company. Taft Broadcasting took the name from the previous landlord, the defunct King Powder Company, which founded the town of Kings Mills for its workers. The site is between I-71 and the Little Miami River. The park remained in Deerfield Township until it was annexed into the city of Mason in 1997.

The centerpiece of Kings Island has always been its 1/3 scale replica of the Eiffel Tower, located just across the International Street fountain from the main entrance gate. Elevators regularly take patrons up to the lookout tower, which provides a chance to see the entire park and, at park closing, offers the best view of the nightly fireworks display.

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Henry Watkin (March 6, 1824-November 21, 1910), was an expatriate English printer and cooperative socialist in Cincinnati, Ohio during the mid-to-late 19th century.

While a young printer in London, Watkin became interested in the utopian socialist writings of Robert Owen, Charles Fourier, and Comte de Saint-Simon. Although it is still unknown to what degree Watkin participated in any cooperative or communalist movements in England or America before the Civil War, evidence suggests that Watkin was an active member of a community of progressive and radical Cincinnatians during his professional life. In 1870, he helped to found the Cooperative Land and Building Association No.1 of Hamilton County, Ohio. The housing cooperative was organized in 1871 to build and develop a railroad suburb named Bond Hill just a few miles outside of the corporate limits of Cincinnati. Besides his work founding Bond Hill, Watkin is best known as the friend and fatherly mentor of the 19th century Japanophile writer, Lafcadio Hearn.

After the Civil War, records indicate that Watkin was active in Cincinnati's socialist scene. In 1868, he was one of the initial stockholders subscribed in the Mutual Benefit Grocery, a cooperative grocery store in downtown Cincinnati. The grocery was a hub in the network of Cincinnati progressives including members from other prominent socialist families, the Hallers and McLeans, as well as other forward thinking printers, Caleb Clark and Charles Adams, also active in Cincinnati socialist movements.

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Cincinnati oh skyline.jpg You are invited to participate in WikiProject Cincinnati, a task force dedicated to developing and improving articles about the Greater Cincinnati area.

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