Portal:Kenya

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kenya portal

The Kenya Portal

Flag of Kenya
Coat of Arms of Kenya
Location of Kenya

The Republic of Kenya, or Jamhuri ya Kenya (Kiswahili) is a country in East Africa. It is divided into 47 Counties, with the most populous county being Nairobi County and the largest (by size) being Turkana County. Lying along the Indian Ocean, at the equator, Kenya is bordered by Ethiopia (north), Somalia (northeast), Tanzania (south), Uganda and Lake Victoria (west), and South Sudan (northwest). The capital city is Nairobi, 2nd largest in Africa (after Cairo). Kenya spans an area about 85% the size of France or Texas. The population has grown rapidly in recent decades to nearly 44 million. Kenya has numerous wildlife reserves, containing thousands of animal species.

The country is named after Mount Kenya, a very significant landmark and the second among the highest mountain peaks of Africa, and both were originally usually pronounced /ˈknjə/ in English although the native pronunciation and the one intended by the original transcription Kenia was [ˈkenia]. During the presidency of Jomo Kenyatta in the 1960s, the current pronunciation /ˈkɛnjə/ became widespread in English because his name was pronounced according to the original native pronunciation. Before 1920, the area now known as Kenya was known as the British East Africa Protectorate and so there was no need to mention mount when referring to the mountain.


Selected panorama

Upper Hill Panorama
Credit: Mandingoesque
Panorama of Upper Hill, an emerging business district within Nairobi.

Selected article

Safari Rally

The Safari Rally is rally race held in East Africa. It was first held from 27 May to 1 June 1953 as the East African Coronation Safari in Kenya, Uganda and Tanganyika, as a celebration of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960 it was renamed the East African Safari Rally and kept that name until 1974, when it became the Safari Rally.

The Safari Rally adopted the special stage format in 1996. From that edition until 2002, it featured over 1000 km of timed stages, with stages well over 60 km long, unlike most rallies which had under 500 km of total timed distance. This meant that the winner's total time was above 12 hours in 1996 and decreased to two seconds shy of 8 hours in 2002.

The event was part of the World Rally Championship calendar for many years until being excluded after 2002 due to lack of funding and organisation in 2003. The Kenyan government is trying to get the rally's WRC status restored. Since 2003 the event has been part of the African Rally Championship organized by the FIA. It is currently known as the KCB Safari Rally after its sponsor, Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB).

Local driver Shekhar Mehta was the most successful in the event with five outright victories (1973, 1979–1982).

(Read more...)

Selected picture

Two men

Two men at a Maasai village in Kenya, wearing traditional Maasai apparel.

Selected culture biography

Samuel Wanjiru

Samuel Kamau Wanjiru (10 November 1986 – 15 May 2011) was a Kenyan athlete who specialised in long distance running. He became a professional at a young age and broke the world record in the half marathon when he was 18 years old. In 2007, he broke the 20 km road running record and improved the half marathon record by over twenty seconds.

He moved to the full marathon and won the event at the 2008 Beijing Olympics in an Olympic record time of 2:06:32; becoming the first Kenyan to win the Olympic gold in the marathon. The following year, he won both the London Marathon and Chicago Marathon, running the fastest marathons ever recorded in the United Kingdom and United States, respectively. He retained his Chicago title in 2010 in a season fraught with injury.

In 2011, he died after falling off a balcony at his home in Nyahururu following a domestic dispute. Police are still uncertain whether his death was a suicide, homicide or accidental.

(Read more...)

Did you know ...

  • ...that as of March 2013, Kenya is officially divided into 47 semi autonomous counties?
  • ...that Kenya has 42 ethnic groups and no single ethnic group in Kenya makes even a quarter of Kenya's total population of 44,354,000 as of 2013?
  • ...that the average Kenyan is multilingual because most Kenyans speak at least three languages, namely Swahili and English, which are used as the official languages, and a native Kenyan language often acquired as mother tongue and which differs between the 42 ethnic groups a Kenyan individual has?
  • ...that English is the medium of instruction for schools in Kenya?
  • ...that Kenya's official name in Swahili is Jamhuri ya Kenya?
  • ...that Kenyans drink more chai (Swahili for tea) but not very much coffee even though the country produces a lot of both? And that Kenyans prefer most of their drinks hot?
  • ...that Lake Turkana in Kenya is the largest desert lake in the world?
  • ...that Nairobi, the capital city, is the only city in the world with a major National Park in it? Kenya also has all five of the big five game i.e. lion, leopard, buffalo, African elephant and rhino.
  • ...that Kenya borders Africa’s largest lake by area, Lake Victoria? It is the largest tropical lake in the world. It is also the world's second-largest freshwater lake with a surface area of 68,800 square kilometres (26,600 sq mi).
  • ...that Mt Kenya is the second-tallest mountain in Africa? It is 5,199 metres (17,057 ft) tall.
  • ...that a third of the flowers in the European Union come from Kenya?
  • ...that telling time in the Swahili language is different from English? For example, when saying 7 am one says Saa Moja which literally means 1 hour because in Swahili it was decided to use sunrise as a guide to tell time.
  • ...that Jason Dunford, an All-Africa Games gold medalist and runner-up for the 2006 Kenyan Sportsman of the Year award, has a younger brother who was selected "most promising sportsman" at the same awards?

Selected societal biography

Tom Mboya

Thomas Joseph Odhiambo Mboya (15 August 1930 – 5 July 1969) was a Kenyan politician during Jomo Kenyatta's government. He was founder of the Nairobi People's Congress Party, a key figure in the formation of the Kenya African National Union (KANU), and the Minister of Economic Planning and Development at the time of his death. Mboya was assassinated on 5 July 1969 in Nairobi..


(Read more...)

Selected location

Dusk L. Naivasha

Nakuru County is a county in Kenya. The capital and largest town is Nakuru, although Naivasha is another major significant urban centre. With a population of 1,603,325 (2009 census), it is the fourth largest county in Kenya after Nairobi, Kakamega and Kiambu in that order in terms of population. Nakuru County has an area of 2,325.8 km².

Nakuru is an agriculturally-oriented area and is home to Lake Nakuru and Lake Naivasha some of the Rift Valley soda lakes. Lake Nakuru is best known for its thousands, sometimes millions of flamingoes nesting along the shores. The surface of the shallow lake is often hardly recognisable due to the continually shifting mass of pink. The number of flamingoes on the lake varies with water and food conditions and the best vantage point is from Baboon cliff. Also of interest, an area of 188 km around the lake fenced off as a sanctuary to protect Rothschild giraffe and black rhinos.

Other sites of interest around Nakuru include Menengai Crater, an extinct volcano 2,490m (8,167 ft) high. The views of the crater itself, as well as the surrounding countryside, are spectacular. (Read more...)

In the news

Categories


Topics in Kenya

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia sister projects provide more on this subject:
Wikibooks  Wikimedia Commons Wikinews  Wikiquote  Wikisource  Wikiversity  Wikivoyage  Wiktionary  Wikidata 
Books Media News Quotations Texts Learning resources Travel guides Definitions Database