Portal:Louisville

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The Louisville Portal

Louis XVI statue JCC.jpg

Louisville (Listeni/ˈlvɪl/, local Listeni/ˈl.əvəl/ or Listeni/ˈlʌvəl/) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Kentucky, and the county seat of Jefferson County. Since 2003, the city's borders have been coterminous with those of the county because of a city-county merger. The city's population at the 2010 census was 741,096. An important internal shipping port in the 19th century, Louisville today is best known as the location of the Kentucky Derby, the first of three annual thoroughbred horse races making up the Triple Crown.

Louisville is situated on the Ohio River in north-central Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. Because it includes counties in Southern Indiana, the Louisville metropolitan area is often referred to as Kentuckiana. The river forms the border between Kentucky and Indiana. A resident of Louisville is referred to as a Louisvillian. Although situated in a Southern state, Louisville is influenced by both Southern and Midwestern culture. It is sometimes referred to as either the northernmost Southern city or the southernmost Northern city in the United States.

The settlement that became the city of Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark and is named after King Louis XVI of France.

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The United States Marine Hospital of Louisville, in the Portland neighborhood was built in 1845, and is considered the best remaining antebellum hospital in the United States. Of the seven hospitals built in the mid-19th century by the Marine Hospital Service “for the benefit of sick seamen, boatmen, and other navigators on the western rivers and lakes.” It is the only one still standing, even after surviving two tornadoes. The building has been extensively restored to match its appearance in 1899.

In 2003, the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP) placed the building on its America's Most Endangered Places list, which helped spark public interest in restoring it. The hospital has now been returned to its 1899 appearance, the earliest reference of the building's appearance that can be found. In 2003, the hospital received a $375,000 Save America's Treasures grant from the NTHP to repair its roof and exterior. On November 11, 2005, rebuilding of the structure began. The smokestack, constructed in 1933, was demolished to help return the structure to its 1899 appearance. The octagonal cupola, which patients used to better view the passing river traffic during its heyday, was also rebuilt.

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Fourteen Mile Creek mouth.jpg
Photo credit: C. Bedford Crenshaw
The mouth of Fourteen Mile Creek, in Charlestown,Indiana flowing into the Ohio River.

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Clarksville, Indiana is a town in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. The population was 21,400 at the 2000 United States Census. Clarksville is named for American Revolutionary War General George Rogers Clark who lived for a time on a point of land on the Ohio River. Founded in 1783, the town is believed to be the first true American settlement in the Northwest Territory.

The town failed to flourish in the 1800s, due to the many floods. It was a popular dueling spot for Kentuckians who wanted to dodge Kentucky's anti-dueling laws. The most famous of these was the 1809 duel between Henry Clay and Humphrey Marshall.

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On this day in Louisville history...

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The Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts, located in Louisville, is the premier performing arts center in Kentucky. Home to many of the state's major arts organizations, The Kentucky Center brings the finest in music, dance, theater and more to Kentucky! The Center is the home for Louisville’s nationally-renowned arts scene, to The Louisville Orchestra, Kentucky Opera, Louisville Ballet, Stage One and PNC Bank Broadway Across America – Louisville, as well as a host of community theaters and its own Kentucky Center Presents performances.

The three theaters of the Center, along with its sister facility the elegant W. L. Lyons Brown Theatre, are Kentucky’s showcases for the performing arts. From Broadway to ballet, from blues to bluegrass, from Big Bands to Beethoven, the Center's stages overflow with magnificent entertainment almost every night of the year.

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Colonel Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980), whose full name was Harland David Sanders, was the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC). His image is omnipresent in the chain's advertising and packaging.

At the age of 40, Sanders cooked chicken dishes for people who stopped at his service station in Corbin, Kentucky. Since he did not have a restaurant, he served customers in his living quarters in the service station. Eventually, his local popularity grew, and Sanders moved to a motel and restaurant that seated 142 people and worked as the chef. Over the next nine years, he perfected his method of cooking chicken. Furthermore, he made use of a pressure fryer that allowed the chicken to be cooked much faster than by pan-frying. He was given the honorary title "Kentucky Colonel" in 1935 by Governor Ruby Laffoon. Sanders chose to call himself "Colonel" and to dress in a stereotypical "southern gentleman" costume as a way of self-promotion. Sanders sold his franchise in 1964, although he remained their corporate spokesman until his death.

Quotes

  • “It all keeps me busy, I love Louisville. I'll always be in Louisville.”Paul Hornung
  • “It's important to support this because of what happened right here. It's like living in Louisville and someone never having been to the Derby. I don't think a lot of people realize what goes on here.”Mark Wells
  • “As the state's biggest city, Louisville sets the precedent.” – Mike Kuntz

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