Portal:Metro Detroit/Selected article

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Detroit Metropolitan Airport is the region's major international airport. The McNamara Terminal's ExpressTram is used to transport passengers from one end of the terminal to the other.
Transportation in metropolitan Detroit is provided by a comprehensive system of transit services, airports, and an advanced network of freeways which interconnect the city and region. The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) administers the region's network of major roads and freeways. The region offers mass transit with bus services provided jointly by the Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) and the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART) through a cooperative service and fare agreement. Cross border service between the downtown areas of Windsor and Detroit is provided by Transit Windsor via the Tunnel Bus. A monorail system, known as the People Mover, operates daily through a 2.9 mile (4.6 km) loop in the downtown area. The Woodward Avenue Light Rail, beginning 2013, will serve as a link between the Detroit People Mover downtown and SEMCOG Commuter Rail with access to DDOT and SMART buses. Amtrak's current passenger facility is north of downtown in the New Center area. Amtrak provides service to Detroit, operating its Wolverine service between Chicago, Illinois, and Pontiac. Greyhound Bus operates a station on Howard Street near Michigan Avenue. The city's Dock and public terminal receives cruise ships on International Riverfront near the Renaissance Center which complements tourism in metropolitan Detroit.



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Map of I-375 (red) and BS I-375 (green) in Detroit
At only 1.06 miles (1.71 km) in length, Interstate 375 (I-375) in Detroit has the distinction of being the shortest signed Interstate Highway that is up to Interstate Standards. Only the unsigned I-878, I-110, and I-315 are shorter. I-375 is the southernmost leg of the Walter P. Chrysler Freeway. It is a spur off I-75 into downtown Detroit to end at the unsigned Business Spur Interstate 375 (BS I-375), better known as Jefferson Avenue. The freeway starts near the Renaissance Center downtown and turns northward. Between 14,000 and 54,000 vehicles use I-375 on average each day. Construction on the freeway started on January 30, 1959, and it opened on June 26, 1964.



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The Renaissance Center (also known as the GM Renaissance Center and nicknamed the RenCen) is a group of seven interconnected skyscrapers in Downtown Detroit, Michigan, United States. Located on the International Riverfront, the Renaissance Center complex is owned by General Motors as its world headquarters. The central tower, called the Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center, is the tallest all-hotel skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere, and features the largest rooftop restaurant, Coach Insignia. It has been the tallest building in Michigan since 1977.

John Portman was the principal architect for the original design. The first phase constructed a five-building rosette, with a 73-story hotel surrounded by four 39-story office towers, all surrounded by a square-shaped, all-retail podium (a 350,000 sq. ft. shopping center with retail shops, cafes, restaurants, brokerage firms,, banks, four movie theaters, private clubs, and even a department store). This first phase officially opened in March 1977. Portman's design renewed attention to city architecture, constructing the world's tallest hotel at the time.[1] Two additional 21-story office towers opened in 1981. This type of complex has been termed a city within a city.

In 2004, General Motors completed a $500 million renovation of its world headquarters in the Renaissance Center, which it had purchased in 1996. The renovation included the addition of the five-story Wintergarden, which provides access to the International Riverfront. Architects for the renovation included Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Gensler, SmithGroup, and Ghafari Associates. Work continued in and around the complex until 2005. The Renaissance Center totals 5,552,000 square feet (515,800 m2) making it one of the world's largest office complexes.




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The Henry Ford, a National Historic Landmark, (also known as the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village, and more formally as the Edison Institute), in the Metro Detroit suburb of Dearborn, Michigan, USA, is the nation's "largest indoor-outdoor history museum" complex. Named for its founder, the noted automobile industrialist Henry Ford, and based on his desire to preserve items of historical significance and portray the Industrial Revolution, the property houses a vast array of famous homes, machinery, exhibits, and Americana. The collection contains many rare exhibits including John F. Kennedy's presidential limousine, Abraham Lincoln's chair from Ford's Theatre, Thomas Edison's laboratory, the Wright Brothers' bicycle shop, and the Rosa Parks bus.



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The economy of metropolitan Detroit is a key pillar of the economy of the United States. Its ten county area has a population of over 5.3 million, a workforce of 2.6 million, and about 240,000 businesses. Detroit's six county Metropolitan Statistical Area has a population of about 4.5 million, a workforce of about 2.1 million, and a Gross Metropolitan Product of $177.5 billion. Detroit's urban area has a population of 3.9 million. A 2005 PricewaterhouseCoopers study estimated that Detroit's urban area had a Gross Domestic Product of $203 billion.

About 80,500 people work in downtown Detroit, comprising 21 percent of the city's employment. Metro Detroit has propelled Michigan's national ranking in emerging technology fields such as life sciences, information technology, and advanced manufacturing; Michigan ranks fourth nationally in high tech employment with 568,000 high tech workers, which includes 70,000 in the automotive industry. Michigan typically ranks third or fourth in overall Research & development (R&D) expenditures in the United States. Metro Detroit is an important source of engineering job opportunities. Detroit is known as the automobile capital of the world, with the domestic auto industry primarily headquartered in Metro Detroit. New vehicle production, sales, and jobs related to automobile use account for one of every ten jobs in the United States.




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Somerset Collection is a premium upscale shopping mall located in the Metro Detroit suburb and commercial area of Troy, Michigan. Developed, managed and co-owned by The Forbes Company, the center is anchored by department stores Nordstrom, Macy's, Neiman Marcus, and Saks Fifth Avenue. More than 180 additional specialty shops and restaurants are located at Somerset, including Tiffany & Co., Louis Vuitton, Barneys Co-op, Crate and Barrel, P.F. Chang's China Bistro, J. Alexander's, Brio Tuscan Grille, McCormick & Schmick's, The Capital Grille, California Pizza Kitchen, and the Peacock Café food court. Somerset Collection is among the most profitable malls in the United States not owned by a real estate investment trust. Mall developers consider Somerset Collection to be among the nation's top privately held mall properties with 2004 annual sales of about $600 million and sales per square foot at $620 compared to the national average of $341, well above the "Class A" threshold. Of the 100 most profitable malls, 76 are owned by real estate investment trusts.



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Tourism in metropolitan Detroit depends on drawing large crowds to positively impact the local economy. As the world's traditional automotive center, the city hosts the annual North American International Auto Show in January, a multi-day event. Other major multi-day events which reflect the region's culture such as the Motown Winter Blast and the Detroit-Windsor International Freedom Festival can draw super sized-crowds of hundreds of thousands to over three million people. In 2006, the four-day Motown Winter Blast drew a cold weather crowd of about 1.2 million people to Campus Martius Park area downtown. Metro Detroit is one of thirteen U.S. cities with teams from four major sports.

Besides casino gaming, the region's leading attraction is The Henry Ford, America's largest indoor-outdoor museum complex, a museum entertainment complex with an IMAX theater next to the Automotive Hall of Fame in Dearborn. The Detroit Institute of Arts in the cultural center downtown is another leading attraction. The Detroit Festival of the Arts in Midtown draws about 350,000 people. The Detroit Zoo in Royal Oak has the nation's largest polar bear exhibit, the Arctic Ring of Wildlife. The zoo has a train which encircles the park. Together, The Henry Ford, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Zoo attract about 2,500,000 visitors annually.




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The city name comes from the Detroit River (French: le détroit du Lac Érie), meaning the strait of Lake Erie, linking Lake Huron and Lake Erie; in the historical context, the strait included Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair River. Traveling up the Detroit River on the ship Le Griffon (owned by La Salle), Father Louis Hennepin noted the north bank of the river as an ideal location for a settlement. There, in 1701, the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, along with fifty-one additional French-Canadians, founded a settlement called Fort Ponchartrain du Détroit, naming it after the comte de Pontchartrain, Minister of Marine under Louis XIV. France offered free land to attract families to Detroit, which grew to 800 people in 1765, the largest city between Montreal and New Orleans. Francois Marie Picoté, sieur de Belestre (Montreal 1719–1793) was the last French military commander at Fort Detroit (1758–1760), surrendering the fort on November 29, 1760 to British Major Robert Rogers (of Rogers' Rangers fame and sponsor of the Jonathan Carver expedition to St. Anthony Falls). The British gained control of the area in 1760 and were thwarted by an Indian attack three years later during Pontiac's Rebellion. The region's fur trade was an important economic activity. Detroit's city flag reflects this French heritage.



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  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference tallesthotel was invoked but never defined (see the help page).