Portal:Mythology/Featured creature

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Featured creature/1[edit]

Scene from Nosferatu

Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings who subsist by feeding on the life essence (generally in the form of blood) of living creatures, regardless of whether they are undead or a living person. Although vampiric entities have been recorded in many cultures and according to speculation by literary historian Brian Frost that the "belief in vampires and bloodsucking demons is as old as man himself", and may go back to "prehistoric times", the term vampire was not popularized until the early 18th century, after an influx of vampire superstition into Western Europe from areas where vampire legends were frequent.

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Featured creature/2[edit]

Thunderclouds

An ala or hala (plural: ale or hali) is a mythological creature recorded in the folklore of Bulgarians, Macedonians, and Serbs. Ale are considered demons of bad weather whose main purpose is to lead hail-producing thunderclouds in the direction of fields, vineyards, or orchards to destroy the crops, or loot and take them away. Extremely voracious, ale particularly like to eat children, though their gluttony is not limited to Earth. It is believed they can try to devour the Sun or the Moon causing eclipses; her success would mean the end of the world.

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Featured creature/3[edit]

Tyr and Fenrir

In Norse mythology, Fenrir (Old Norse "fen-dweller"), Fenrisúlfr (Old Norse "Fenris wolf"), Hróðvitnir (Old Norse "fame-wolf"), or Vánagandr (Old Norse "the monster of the river Ván") is a monstrous wolf. Fenrir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both the Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, Fenrir is the father of the wolves Sköll and Hati Hróðvitnisson, is a son of Loki, and is foretold to kill the god Odin during the events of Ragnarök, but will in turn be killed by Odin's son Víðarr.

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Featured creature/4[edit]

Shiva as Sharabha

Sharabha (Sanskrit: शरभ, Kannada: ಶರಭ, Śarabha) is a part-lion and part-bird beast in Hindu mythology, who, according to Sanskrit literature, is eight-legged and more powerful than a lion or an elephant, possessing the ability to clear a valley in one jump. In later literature, Sharabha is described as an eight-legged deer. Shaivite scriptures relate that god Shiva assumed the avatar (incarnation) of Sharabha in order to tame Narasimha, the fierce man-lion avatar of Vishnu. This manifestation is popularly known as Sharabeshwara ("Lord Sarabha") or Sharabeshwara-murti. The tale usually ends with the defeat of Narasimha and Vishnu becoming a devotee of Shiva.

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Featured creature/5[edit]

Ratatoskr

In Norse mythology, Ratatoskr (Old Norse, generally considered "drill-tooth" or "bore-tooth") is a squirrel who runs up and down the world tree Yggdrasil to carry messages between the unnamed eagle, perched atop Yggdrasil, and the wyrm Níðhöggr, who dwells beneath one of the three roots of the tree. Ratatoskr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Scholars have proposed theories about the implications of the squirrel. According to Vigfússon, Ratatoskr means "tusk the traveller" or "the climber tusk."


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Featured creature/6[edit]

Huginn and Muninn

In Norse mythology, Huginn and Muninn are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, and bring the god Odin information. Huginn and Muninn are attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; in the Third Grammatical Treatise, compiled in the 13th century by Óláfr Þórðarson; and in the poetry of skalds. The names of the ravens are sometimes modernly anglicized as Hugin and Munin. In the Poetic Edda, a disguised Odin expresses that he fears that they may not return from their daily flights.


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Featured creature/7[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/7
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Featured creature/8[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/8
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Featured creature/9[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/9
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Featured creature/10[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/10
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Featured creature/11[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/11
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Featured creature/12[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/12
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Featured creature/13[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/13
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Featured creature/14[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/14
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Featured creature/15[edit]

Portal:Mythology/Featured creature/15
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Nominations[edit]

Legendary creatures featured here should be assessed at class B or above on the article talkpage. Please place candidates in the section below ("New nominations") for future selected creatures, using the following template:

=== [[Your creature here]] ===

Include a summary or the first paragraph of the article here.

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Include your reasons for nominating the creature here. ~~~~

<br clear="all">

New nominations[edit]