Portal:Nanotechnology/Selected image

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The selected image updates every two weeks. There should be 26 images in this list. We are currently displaying selected image 11.

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Buckminsterfullerene

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A skeletal chemical structure of buckminsterfullerene, the simplest of the fullerenes
Credit: Ben Mills

A skeletal chemical structure of buckminsterfullerene

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Local oxidation nanolithography

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The first paragraph of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote written on a silicon chip by local oxidation nanolithography. The local oxidation technique would allow one to write the entire book (more than 1,000 pages) on a surface as big as the tip of one human hair.
Credit: Ramsés V. Martínez

The first paragraph of Cervantes' Don Quixote written on a silicon chip by local oxidation nanolithography

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Fullerenes in popular culture

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"Quantum Reality (Large Buckyball Around Trees)" (2007), an art installation by physicist-turned-artist Julian Voss-Andreae. It is a 30' (9 m) diameter buckyball-shaped steel structure intersected by several trees that grow freely through the structure and support it in mid-air, just above arm's reach.
Credit: Julian Voss-Andreae

A 30' (9 m) buckyball structure by Julian Voss-Andreae. View from below. Location: Private property in Portland, Oregon, USA

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Allotropes of carbon

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This illustration depicts eight of the allotropes, or different molecular configurations, that pure carbon can take: (a) diamond, (b) graphite, (c) Lonsdaleite, (d) C60 Buckminsterfullerene), (e) C540, (f) C70, (g) amorphous carbon, (h) single-walled carbon nanotube.
Credit: Michael Ströck

This illustration depicts eight of the allotropes, or different molecular configurations, that pure carbon can take.

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Surface reconstruction

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Image of surface reconstruction on a clean gold (Au(100)) surface, as visualized using scanning tunneling microscopy. The individual atoms composing the material are visible. Surface reconstruction causes the surface atoms to deviate from the bulk crystal structure, and arrange in columns several atoms wide with regularly-spaced pits between them.
Credit: Erwin Rossen

Scanning tunneling microscope image of surface reconstruction on a clean gold (Au(100)) surface

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Rotaxane

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A rotaxane with a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) macrocycle, generated from a crystal structure data reported by Bravo, Raymo, Stoddart, White, and Williams in 1998
Credit: User:M stone

A rotaxane with a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) macrocycle

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Atomic force microscopy

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An atomic force microscope image of a surface of a CD-ROM. The pattern of pits visible ion the image are responsible for storing the data on the CD-ROM.
Credit: User:Freiermensch on Commons

An atomic force microscope image of a surface of a CD-ROM

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Atom probe

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Visualisation of data obtained from an atom probe, each point represents a reconstructed atom position from detected evaporated ions.
Credit: C. B. Ene

Visualisation of data obtained from an atom probe

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Scanning tunneling microscopy

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A comparison between an ideal scanning tunneling microscope tip (left) and a real one (right)
Credit: Krzysztof Blachnicki

Scanning tunneling microscope - ideal tipScanning tunneling microscope - real tip

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Buckminsterfullerene

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Bucky ball with isosurface of ground state electron density, calculated with DFT and the CPMD code.
Credit: Isaac Tamblyn

Bucky ball with isosurface of ground state electron density, calculated with DFT and the CPMD code.

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History of nanotechnology

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The world's first atomic force microscope on display in the Science Museum in London, UK.
Credit: John Dalton

The world's first atomic force microscope on display in the Science Museum in London, UK.

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Carbon nanotube

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An atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscope image of a chiral carbon nanotube
Credit: Taner Yildirim/NIST

An atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscope image of a chiral carbon nanotube

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Nanoscale

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A comparison of the size scales of various biological assemblies and technological devices
Credit: Guillaume Paumier; components from Philip Ronan, NIH, Artur Jan Fijałkowski, Jerome Walker, Michael David Jones, Tyler Heal, Mariana Ruiz, NCBI, User:Liquid_2003 on Commons, Arne Nordmann, and Tango Desktop Project

A comparison of the size scales of various biological assemblies and technological devices

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Scanning tunneling microscopy

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A look into the ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber of a UHV scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Several grippers are mounted to move samples back and forth between the holder for multiple samples and the STM microscope, which is the tubular gold capped structure held by a spring suspension.
Credit: Kristian Molhave

A look into the ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber of a UHV scanning tunneling microscope

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DNA nanotechnology

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Atomic force micrograph of a two-dimensional DX DNA array on a mica surface, of the type used in DNA nanotechnology. Individual DX molecules are visible within the array. The field width is 150 nm.
Credit: User:Antony-22

Atomic force micrograph of a two-dimensional DX DNA array on a mica surface, of the type used in DNA nanotechnology.

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Optical properties of carbon nanotubes

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A photoluminescence map from single-wall carbon nanotubes. (n, m) indexes identify certain semiconducting nanotubes.
Credit: User:NIMSoffice on Commons

A photoluminescence map from single-wall carbon nanotubes

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Nanoparticle

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Transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of a star-shaped nanoparticle. NIST scientists found that gold and silver nanostars improved the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) 10 to 100,000 times that of other commonly used nanoparticles. These uniquely shaped nanoparticles may one day be used in a range of applications from disease diagnostics to contraband identification. Color added for clarity.
Credit: E. Nalbant Esenturk and A. R. Hight Walker/NIST

Transmission electron microscope image of a star-shaped nanoparticle

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Atomic force microscopy

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A Veeco NanoScope IIIa atomic force microscope apparatus
Credit: User:Limojoe on Czech Wikipedia

An atomic force microscope apparatus

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Mechanosynthesis

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A 40-nanometer-wide National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) logo made with cobalt atoms on a copper surface. The ripples in the background are made by electron waves
Credit: Joseph Stroscio and Robert Celotta/NIST

A 40-nanometer-wide NIST logo made with cobalt atoms on a copper surface

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Quantum dot

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Energy transfer diagrammed from nano-thin layers of Sandia-grown quantum wells to the LANL nanocrystals (a.k.a. quantum dots) above the nanolayers.
Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory

Energy transfer diagrammed from nano-thin layers of Sandia-grown quantum wells to the LANL nanocrystals (a.k.a. quantum dots) above the nanolayers.

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Nanoputian

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Chemical structure of a nanoputian, one of a series of organic molecules whose structural formulas resemble human forms. James Tour and coworkers at Rice University designed and synthesized these compounds in 2003 as a part of a chemical education effort for young students. The nanoputian pictured is 2-(2,5-bis(3,3-dimethylbut-1-ynyl)-4-(2-(3,5-di(pent-1-ynyl)phenyl)ethynyl)phenyl)-1,3-dioxolane, or "nanokid".
Credit: User:Calvero on Commons

Atomic force micrograph of a two-dimensional DX DNA array on a mica surface, of the type used in DNA nanotechnology.

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Quantum corral

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Image of an elliptical quantum corral built using the autonomous atom assembler; cobalt atoms were deposited at sub-monolayer coverage on a Cu(111) at 7K in ultra-high vacuum and subsequent scanning tunneling microscope measurements were performed at a 4.3 K sample temperature.
Credit: Joseph A. Stroscio, Robert J. Celotta, Steven R. Blankenship, and Frank M. Hess/NIST

Image of an elliptical quantum corral built using the autonomous atom assembler; Cobalt atoms were deposited at sub-monolayer coverage on a Cu(111) at 7K in ultra-high vacuum and subsequent scanning tunneling microscope measurements were performed at a 4.3 K sample temperature.

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Synthetic molecular motor

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A chemically driven rotary synthetic molecular motor, demonstrated by T. Ross Kelly et al. in 1999
Credit: User:TommyCP on Commons

A chemically driven rotary synthetic molecular motor

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History of nanotechnology

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The first scanning tunneling microscope, invented by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer at IBM Zurich in 1981, currently in the Deutsches Museum
Credit: brewbooks on Flickr

The first scanning tunneling microscope

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DNA nanotechnology

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At left, DNA tile structure consisting of four branched junctions oriented at 90° intervals. These tiles serve as the primary building block for the assembly of the full DNA nanogrid. At right, an atomic force microscope image of a self-assembled DNA nanogrid. Individual DNA tiles self-assemble into a highly ordered periodic two-dimensional DNA nanogrid.
Credit: Thomas H. LaBean and Hao Yan

An atomic force microscope image of a self-assembled DNA nanogrid

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Atomic force microscopy

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A scanning electron microscope image of a used atomic force microscope cantilever (magnification 1000x)
Credit: User:SecretDisc on Commons

View of cantilever in Atomic Force Microscope (magnification 1000x)

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