Portal:New England

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The New England portal

New england ref 2001.jpg
Welcome to the New England portal. New England is a region in the northeastern corner of the United States consisting of the six states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. New England is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, Canada, and the State of New York.

In one of the earliest English settlements in North America, pilgrims from England first settled in New England in 1620 to form Plymouth Colony. Ten years later, the Puritans settled north of Plymouth Colony in Boston, thus forming Massachusetts Bay Colony. In the late 18th century, the New England Colonies initiated the resistance to the British Parliament's efforts to impose new taxes without the consent of the colonists. This confrontation led to open warfare in 1775, the expulsion of the British from New England in spring 1776, and the Declaration of Independence in July 1776.

Some of the first movements of American literature, philosophy, and education originated in New England. The region played a prominent role in the movement to abolish slavery, and was the first region of the United States to be transformed by the Industrial Revolution. Today, New England is a major world center of education, technology, insurance, and medicine. Boston is its cultural, financial, educational, medical and transportation center.

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Tuck Hall, the School's main administrative building
The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration (or the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, as it is now called) is the graduate business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Founded in 1900, Tuck is the oldest graduate school of business in the world, and was the first institution to offer master's degrees in the field of business administration. Tuck is one of six Ivy League business schools and it consistently ranks in the top five in many business school rankings.

Tuck grants only one degree, the Master of Business Administration (MBA), alongside shorter programs for executives and recent college graduates, although there are opportunities for dual degrees with other institutions. The school places a heavy emphasis on its tight-knit and residential character, and has a student population that hovers near 500 students and a full-time faculty of 46. Tuck claims over 8,400 living alumni in a variety of fields, with the highest rate of alumni donation of any business school.

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Portrait of George Washington Dixon, c. 1836
George Washington Dixon was an American singer, stage actor, and newspaper editor. He rose to prominence as a blackface performer (possibly the first American to do so) after performing "Coal Black Rose", "Zip Coon", and similar songs. He later turned to a career in journalism, during which he earned the enmity of members of the upper class for his frequent allegations against them. By 1835, Dixon considered journalism to be his primary vocation. His first major paper was Dixon's Daily Review, which he published from Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1835. He followed this in 1836 with Dixon's Saturday Night Express, published in Boston.
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Flag of Rhode Island

Rhode Island
Incorporated 1776
Co-ordinates 41.7°N 71.5°W

Rhode Island, officially the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, is the smallest in area, the 8th least populous, but the 2nd most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states.

Rhode Island was the first of the 13 original colonies to declare independence from British rule, declaring itself independent on May 4, 1776, two months before any other colony. The State was also the last of the thirteen original colonies to ratify the United States Constitution.

Rhode Island's official nickname is "The Ocean State," a reference to the State's geography, since Rhode Island has several large bays and inlets that amount to about fourteen (14) percent of its total area. Its land area is 1,045 square miles (2706 km2), but its total area is significantly larger.

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1812 political cartoon that led to the term Gerrymandering
Credit: Elkanah Tisdale (1812)

1812 political cartoon that led to the term Gerrymandering; originally appearing in the Boston Centinel

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