Portal:New Zealand

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

THE NEW ZEALAND PORTAL

Flag of New Zealand
Coat of Arms of New Zealand
Location on the world map

New Zealand (Aotearoa in te reo Māori) is a country of two large islands and many much smaller islands in the south-western Pacific Ocean. Among South Pacific nations, New Zealand has the largest and most industrialised economy and is second only to Papua New Guinea in population. New Zealand is notable for its isolation, being separated from Australia on the northwest by the Tasman Sea, some 2,000 km wide. The closest neighbours to the north are New Caledonia, Fiji and Tonga.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II of New Zealand is the Queen of New Zealand and is represented in the country by the non-partisan Governor-General. De facto political power is held by Prime Minister John Key who, as Head of the Government, requires the confidence of the democratically elected New Zealand House of Representatives. The Realm of New Zealand includes the self-governing Cook Islands and Niue, as well as Tokelau and New Zealand's claims in Antarctica.

Selected article

Aoraki Mount Cook.JPG
Aoraki/Mount Cook is the highest mountain in New Zealand, and 37th most prominent peak in the world, reaching a height of 3,754 metres (12,316 ft). It lies in the Southern Alps, the mountain range which runs the length of the South Island. A popular tourist destination, it is also a favourite challenge for mountain climbers. Aoraki/Mount Cook consists of three summits lying slightly south and east of the main divide, the Low Peak, Middle Peak and High Peak, with the Tasman Glacier to the east and the Hooker Glacier to the west.

Aoraki means "Cloud Piercer" in the Ngāi Tahu dialect of the Māori language. Historically, the Māori name has been spelt Aorangi in the "canonical" Māori form. While the mountain was known to Māori centuries before, the first European known to see Aoraki/Mount Cook was Abel Tasman, on December 13, 1642 during his first Pacific voyage. The English name of Mount Cook was given to the mountain in 1851 by Captain John Lort Stokes to honour Captain James Cook who first surveyed and circumnavigated the islands of New Zealand in 1770. Captain Cook did not sight the mountain during his exploration. Following the settlement between Ngāi Tahu and the Crown in 1998, the name of the mountain was officially changed from Mount Cook to Aoraki/Mount Cook to incorporate its historic Māori name, Aoraki. Under the settlement the Crown agreed to return title to Aoraki/Mount Cook to Ngāi Tahu, who then formally gifted it back to the nation.

The first ascent was on 25 December 1894, when New Zealanders Tom Fyfe, James (Jack) Clarke and George Graham successfully reached the summit via the Hooker Valley and the north ridge. Ed Hillary made his first ascent in January 1947. In February 1948 with Ruth Adams, Harry Ayres and Mick Sullivan, Hillary made the first ascent of the South Ridge to the Low Peak.

Selected picture

University of Otago clock tower

The University of Otago in Dunedin is New Zealand's oldest university. It is the South Island's largest employer and claims to have the world's 2nd longest continuously running annual student revue (the Capping Show) and New Zealand's oldest ballet company (the Selwyn Ballet).

Founded in 1869, the university opened in July 1871. Its motto is "Sapere aude" ("Dare to be wise"). (The University of New Zealand subsequently adopted the same motto.) The University of Otago Students' Association answers this with its own motto, "Audeamus" ("let us dare").

Did you know...

Tom Neale's autobiography

...that New Zealander Tom Neale lived for a total of sixteen years on the otherwise uninhabited atoll of Suwarrow?

...that the world's only two towns called Matamata - in New Zealand and Tunisia - were both sites of filming for major blockbuster movies?

...that whenever trade unionist Bill Andersen and conservative Prime Minister Rob Muldoon flew on the same domestic flight, unionist staff arranged for them to sit next to each other?

...that Te Whanga Lagoon, on Chatham Island, is large enough that it could contain all the other islands in the Chatham Islands chain?


Featured articles

The following articles are examples of the best articles and lists in Wikipedia:

New Zealand topics

History Timeline | Treaty of Waitangi | Land Wars | Naval vessels | Fortifications | Antarctic history
Geography Cities | Islands | Mountains | Regions | Rivers | Ecoregions | National Parks | Marine reserves | Lakes | Caves | Disasters
Government Constitution | List of Governments | Foreign relations | Military | Electoral system | Referendums | Honours | List of Statutes of New Zealand | Law of New Zealand
Politics Political parties (Labour, National, New Zealand First, Greens, Māori Party, ACT, United Future) | Elections
Economy Companies | Communications | Transport | Reserve Bank | Stock Exchange
Culture Māori culture | New Zealand English | Cinema | Cuisine | Education | Literature | Music | Holidays | Media | Sport | Wine
Society Demographics | Māori | Pākehā | Gays and lesbians
Biodiversity Animals | Plants | Extinct animals
Other List of New Zealand-related topics

Other NZ-connected WikiMedia

Wikinews
New Zealand News
Wikibooks
New Zealand Books
Wikipedia
Māori Encyclopedia
Commons
New Zealand Images
Wikisource
New Zealand Texts

purge cache