Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture

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Usage[edit]

The layout design for these subpages is at Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/Layout.

  1. Add a new Selected picture to the next available subpage.
  2. Update "max=" to new total for its {{Random portal component}} on the main page.

Selected pictures list[edit]

Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/1

A page from Galileo's published discovery of the moons, which appeared in Sidereus Nuncius in March 1610.
Credit: University of Michigan

It was on this page that Galileo first noted an observation of the moons of Jupiter. This observation upset the notion that all celestial bodies must revolve around the Earth. Galileo published a full description in Sidereus Nuncius in March 1610.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/2

Plato's allegory of the cave
Credit: Mats Halldin

Plato's Allegory of the Cave is perhaps the best known of his many allegories, metaphors, and parables. The allegory is told and interpreted at the beginning of Book 7 of Republic (514A–520A).

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/3

Schrödinger's cat
Credit: Anarkman

A common representation of the uncertainty principle is Schrödinger's cat, a seemingly paradoxical thought experiment devised by Erwin Schrödinger that attempts to illustrate the incompleteness of an early interpretation of quantum mechanics when going from subatomic to macroscopic systems.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/4

The School of Athens is one of the most famous paintings by the Italian renaissance artist Raphael.
Credit: Raffaello Sanzio

The School of Athens shows the greatest philosophers, scientists and mathematicians of classical antiquity. Plato and Aristotle, the Greek philosophers that were considered most important, are standing in the center of the composition at the top of the steps.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/5

The center third of "Education" (1890), a stained glass window by Louis Comfort Tiffany and Tiffany Studios.
Credit: Louis Comfort Tiffany

The center third of Education (1890), a stained glass window by Louis Comfort Tiffany, depicts Science (personified by Devotion, Labor, Truth, Research and Intuition) and Religion (personified by Purity, Faith, Hope, Reverence and Inspiration) in harmony, presided over by Love.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/6

Harmonia Macrocosmica
Credit: Andreas Cellarius

In astronomy, heliocentrism is the belief that the Sun is at the center of the Universe and/or the Solar System. The word is derived from the Greek (Helios = "Sun" and kentron = "Center"). Historically, heliocentrism is opposed to geocentrism and currently to modern geocentrism, which places the earth at the center.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/7

Chart showing signs of the zodiac and the solar system with world at centre.
Credit: Johannes van Loon

In astronomy, the geocentric model of the universe is the theory that the Earth is at the center while the Sun, Moon, stars, and naked eye planets go around it. This model was embraced by Aristotle, Ptolemy and most Greek philosophers.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/8

A typical satire of Darwin, the caricature in Hornet magazine portraying him with an ape body and the bushy beard he grew in 1866.
Credit: Hornet magazine

The reaction to Darwin's theory came quickly after the publication of Darwin's theory, following twenty years of development of Darwin's theory of evolution. Darwin's work was published in On the Origin of Species.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/9

Brain in a vat
Credit: Was a bee

In philosophy, the brain in a vat is any of a variety of thought experiments intended to examine our ideas of knowledge, reality, truth, mind, and meaning. The simplest use of brain-in-a-vat scenarios is as an argument for philosophical skepticism.

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Portal:Philosophy of science/Selected picture/10

The duck-rabbit optical illusion.
Credit: J. Jastrow

An epistemological paradigm shift was called a scientific revolution by epistemologist and historian of science Thomas Kuhn in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. It occurs when scientists encounter anomalies which cannot be explained by the universally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made.

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Nominations[edit]

Feel free to add related featured pictures to the above list. Other pictures may be nominated here.